Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 88

1.

Formation of very large conductance channels by Bacillus cereus Nhe in Vero and GH(4) cells identifies NheA + B as the inherent pore-forming structure.

Haug TM, Sand SL, Sand O, Phung D, Granum PE, Hardy SP.

J Membr Biol. 2010 Sep;237(1):1-11. doi: 10.1007/s00232-010-9298-6. Epub 2010 Sep 7.

2.

Complex formation between NheB and NheC is necessary to induce cytotoxic activity by the three-component Bacillus cereus Nhe enterotoxin.

Heilkenbrinker U, Dietrich R, Didier A, Zhu K, Lindbäck T, Granum PE, Märtlbauer E.

PLoS One. 2013 Apr 30;8(4):e63104. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0063104. Print 2013.

3.

Cytotoxicity of the Bacillus cereus Nhe enterotoxin requires specific binding order of its three exoprotein components.

Lindbäck T, Hardy SP, Dietrich R, Sødring M, Didier A, Moravek M, Fagerlund A, Bock S, Nielsen C, Casteel M, Granum PE, Märtlbauer E.

Infect Immun. 2010 Sep;78(9):3813-21. doi: 10.1128/IAI.00247-10. Epub 2010 Jul 12.

4.

Formation of small transmembrane pores: An intermediate stage on the way to Bacillus cereus non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) full pores in the absence of NheA.

Zhu K, Didier A, Dietrich R, Heilkenbrinker U, Waltenberger E, Jessberger N, Märtlbauer E, Benz R.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2016 Jan 15;469(3):613-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.11.126. Epub 2015 Dec 2.

PMID:
26654951
5.

Characterization of the Bacillus cereus Nhe enterotoxin.

Lindbäck T, Fagerlund A, Rødland MS, Granum PE.

Microbiology. 2004 Dec;150(Pt 12):3959-67.

PMID:
15583149
6.

Bacillus cereus Nhe is a pore-forming toxin with structural and functional properties similar to the ClyA (HlyE, SheA) family of haemolysins, able to induce osmotic lysis in epithelia.

Fagerlund A, Lindbäck T, Storset AK, Granum PE, Hardy SP.

Microbiology. 2008 Mar;154(Pt 3):693-704. doi: 10.1099/mic.0.2007/014134-0. Erratum in: Microbiology. 2008 May;154(Pt 5):1554.

PMID:
18310016
7.

Monoclonal antibodies neutralize Bacillus cereus Nhe enterotoxin by inhibiting ordered binding of its three exoprotein components.

Didier A, Dietrich R, Gruber S, Bock S, Moravek M, Nakamura T, Lindbäck T, Granum PE, Märtlbauer E.

Infect Immun. 2012 Feb;80(2):832-8. doi: 10.1128/IAI.05681-11. Epub 2011 Nov 21.

8.

The NheA component of the non-hemolytic enterotoxin of Bacillus cereus is produced by Bacillus anthracis but is not required for virulence.

Mendelson I, Tobery S, Scorpio A, Bozue J, Shafferman A, Friedlander AM.

Microb Pathog. 2004 Sep;37(3):149-54.

PMID:
15351038
9.

Bacillus cereus enterotoxins act as major virulence factors and exhibit distinct cytotoxicity to different human cell lines.

Jeßberger N, Dietrich R, Bock S, Didier A, Märtlbauer E.

Toxicon. 2014 Jan;77:49-57. doi: 10.1016/j.toxicon.2013.10.028. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

PMID:
24211313
10.

Production and characterization of antibodies against each of the three subunits of the Bacillus cereus nonhemolytic enterotoxin complex.

Dietrich R, Moravek M, Bürk C, Granum PE, Märtlbauer E.

Appl Environ Microbiol. 2005 Dec;71(12):8214-20.

11.

Inhibition of cytotoxicity by the Nhe cytotoxin of Bacillus cereus through the interaction of dodecyl maltoside with the NheB component.

Phung D, Granum PE, Dietrich R, Märtlbauer E, Hardy SP.

FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2012 May;330(2):98-104. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-6968.2012.02538.x. Epub 2012 Mar 22.

12.

Determination of the toxic potential of Bacillus cereus isolates by quantitative enterotoxin analyses.

Moravek M, Dietrich R, Buerk C, Broussolle V, Guinebretière MH, Granum PE, Nguyen-The C, Märtlbauer E.

FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2006 Apr;257(2):293-8.

13.

Toxin production in a rare and genetically remote cluster of strains of the Bacillus cereus group.

Fagerlund A, Brillard J, Fürst R, Guinebretière MH, Granum PE.

BMC Microbiol. 2007 May 21;7:43.

14.

Detection of toxigenic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis spores in U.S. rice.

Ankolekar C, Rahmati T, Labbé RG.

Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Jan 15;128(3):460-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.10.006. Epub 2008 Oct 17.

PMID:
19027973
15.

Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the NheA component of the Nhe toxin from Bacillus cereus.

Phung D, Ganash M, Sedelnikova SE, Lindbäck T, Granum PE, Artymiuk PJ.

Acta Crystallogr Sect F Struct Biol Cryst Commun. 2012 Sep 1;68(Pt 9):1073-6. doi: 10.1107/S1744309112030813. Epub 2012 Aug 31.

16.

Incidence and characterization of diarrheal enterotoxins of fecal Bacillus cereus isolates associated with diarrhea.

Al-Khatib MS, Khyami-Horani H, Badran E, Shehabi AA.

Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2007 Dec;59(4):383-7. Epub 2007 Sep 18.

PMID:
17878069
17.

Role of large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated potassium channels in adenosine A(1) receptor-mediated pharmacological preconditioning in H9c2 cells.

Fretwell L, Dickenson JM.

Eur J Pharmacol. 2009 Sep 15;618(1-3):37-44. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2009.07.008. Epub 2009 Jul 18.

PMID:
19619521
18.

Enterotoxins and emetic toxins production by Bacillus cereus and other species of Bacillus isolated from Soumbala and Bikalga, African alkaline fermented food condiments.

Ouoba LI, Thorsen L, Varnam AH.

Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Jun 10;124(3):224-30. doi: 10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.03.026. Epub 2008 Mar 30.

PMID:
18474404
19.

Comparison of multiplex PCR, enzyme immunoassay and cell culture methods for the detection of enterotoxinogenic Bacillus cereus.

Wehrle E, Moravek M, Dietrich R, Bürk C, Didier A, Märtlbauer E.

J Microbiol Methods. 2009 Sep;78(3):265-70. doi: 10.1016/j.mimet.2009.06.013. Epub 2009 Jun 22.

PMID:
19555727

Supplemental Content

Support Center