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Items: 1 to 20 of 94

1.

Efficacy of skin wash on dermal absorption: an in vitro study on four model compounds of varying solubility.

Nielsen JB.

Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2010 Aug;83(6):683-90. doi: 10.1007/s00420-010-0546-y. Epub 2010 May 26.

PMID:
20502910
2.

Defense against dermal exposures is only skin deep: significantly increased penetration through slightly damaged skin.

Nielsen JB, Nielsen F, Sørensen JA.

Arch Dermatol Res. 2007 Nov;299(9):423-31. Epub 2007 Sep 20.

PMID:
17882442
3.

Effects of soap-water wash on human epidermal penetration.

Zhu H, Jung EC, Phuong C, Hui X, Maibach H.

J Appl Toxicol. 2016 Aug;36(8):997-1002. doi: 10.1002/jat.3258. Epub 2015 Nov 15. Erratum in: J Appl Toxicol. 2016 Nov;36(11):1526.

PMID:
26568168
4.

The usual suspects-influence of physicochemical properties on lag time, skin deposition, and percutaneous penetration of nine model compounds.

Bo Nielsen J, Ahm Sørensen J, Nielsen F.

J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2009;72(5):315-23. doi: 10.1080/15287390802529872.

PMID:
19184747
5.

In vitro percutaneous penetration of five pesticides--effects of molecular weight and solubility characteristics.

Nielsen JB, Nielsen F, Sørensen JA.

Ann Occup Hyg. 2004 Nov;48(8):697-705. Epub 2004 Oct 27.

PMID:
15509631
6.

In vitro dermal absorption rate testing of certain chemicals of interest to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration: summary and evaluation of USEPA's mandated testing.

Fasano WJ, McDougal JN.

Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2008 Jul;51(2):181-94. doi: 10.1016/j.yrtph.2008.04.005. Epub 2008 May 22.

PMID:
18501488
7.

In vitro predictions of skin absorption of caffeine, testosterone, and benzoic acid: a multi-centre comparison study.

van de Sandt JJ, van Burgsteden JA, Cage S, Carmichael PL, Dick I, Kenyon S, Korinth G, Larese F, Limasset JC, Maas WJ, Montomoli L, Nielsen JB, Payan JP, Robinson E, Sartorelli P, Schaller KH, Wilkinson SC, Williams FM.

Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2004 Jun;39(3):271-81.

PMID:
15135208
8.

Percutaneous penetration through slightly damaged skin.

Nielsen JB.

Arch Dermatol Res. 2005 Jun;296(12):560-7. Epub 2005 Apr 15.

PMID:
15834614
9.
10.

Dermal in vitro penetration of methiocarb, paclobutrazol, and pirimicarb.

Nielsen JB, Nielsen F.

Occup Environ Med. 2000 Nov;57(11):734-7.

12.

Development of an in vitro model for determining the fate of chemicals applied to skin.

Hawkins GS Jr, Reifenrath WG.

Fundam Appl Toxicol. 1984 Apr;4(2 Pt 2):S133-44.

PMID:
6724204
13.

Assessment of dermal exposure to chemicals.

van Hemmen JJ, Brouwer DH.

Sci Total Environ. 1995 Jun 16;168(2):131-41.

PMID:
7481731
14.
15.
16.

Isolated human and animal stratum corneum as a partial model for the 15 steps of percutaneous absorption: emphasizing decontamination, part II.

Hui X, Lamel S, Qiao P, Maibach HI.

J Appl Toxicol. 2013 Mar;33(3):173-82. doi: 10.1002/jat.2826. Epub 2012 Oct 30. Review.

PMID:
23112095
17.

Fate of chemicals in skin after dermal application: does the in vitro skin reservoir affect the estimate of systemic absorption?

Yourick JJ, Koenig ML, Yourick DL, Bronaugh RL.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2004 Mar 15;195(3):309-20.

PMID:
15020193
18.

Percutaneous penetration and metabolism of 2-butoxyethanol.

Lockley DJ, Howes D, Williams FM.

Arch Toxicol. 2004 Nov;78(11):617-28. Epub 2004 Sep 29.

PMID:
15455191
19.

Skin decontamination: Importance of the wash-in effect.

Moody RP, Maibach HI.

Food Chem Toxicol. 2006 Nov;44(11):1783-8. Epub 2006 Jun 9. Review.

PMID:
16872731

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