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Items: 1 to 20 of 125

1.

Roles of oxidative stress in signaling and inflammation induced by particulate matter.

Mazzoli-Rocha F, Fernandes S, Einicker-Lamas M, Zin WA.

Cell Biol Toxicol. 2010 Oct;26(5):481-98. doi: 10.1007/s10565-010-9158-2. Review.

PMID:
20340042
2.

Oxidative stress and calcium signaling in the adverse effects of environmental particles (PM10).

Donaldson K, Stone V, Borm PJ, Jimenez LA, Gilmour PS, Schins RP, Knaapen AM, Rahman I, Faux SP, Brown DM, MacNee W.

Free Radic Biol Med. 2003 Jun 1;34(11):1369-82. Review.

PMID:
12757847
3.

Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage by particulate air pollution.

Risom L, Møller P, Loft S.

Mutat Res. 2005 Dec 30;592(1-2):119-37. Review.

PMID:
16085126
4.

Air pollution, ultrafine and nanoparticle toxicology: cellular and molecular interactions.

Stone V, Johnston H, Clift MJ.

IEEE Trans Nanobioscience. 2007 Dec;6(4):331-40. Review.

PMID:
18217626
5.

The role of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in mediating particulate matter injury.

Xia T, Kovochich M, Nel A.

Clin Occup Environ Med. 2006;5(4):817-36. Review.

PMID:
17110294
6.

Short-term effects of particulate matter: an inflammatory mechanism?

Scapellato ML, Lotti M.

Crit Rev Toxicol. 2007;37(6):461-87. Review.

PMID:
17661213
7.

The role of free radicals in the toxic and inflammatory effects of four different ultrafine particle types.

Dick CA, Brown DM, Donaldson K, Stone V.

Inhal Toxicol. 2003 Jan;15(1):39-52.

PMID:
12476359
8.

Airborne particulate matter and human health: toxicological assessment and importance of size and composition of particles for oxidative damage and carcinogenic mechanisms.

Valavanidis A, Fiotakis K, Vlachogianni T.

J Environ Sci Health C Environ Carcinog Ecotoxicol Rev. 2008 Oct-Dec;26(4):339-62. doi: 10.1080/10590500802494538. Review.

PMID:
19034792
9.

Size-dependent proinflammatory effects of ultrafine polystyrene particles: a role for surface area and oxidative stress in the enhanced activity of ultrafines.

Brown DM, Wilson MR, MacNee W, Stone V, Donaldson K.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2001 Sep 15;175(3):191-9.

PMID:
11559017
10.

PM(10) impairs the antioxidant defense system and exacerbates oxidative stress driven cell death.

Chirino YI, Sánchez-Pérez Y, Osornio-Vargas AR, Morales-Bárcenas R, Gutiérrez-Ruíz MC, Segura-García Y, Rosas I, Pedraza-Chaverri J, García-Cuellar CM.

Toxicol Lett. 2010 Apr 1;193(3):209-16. doi: 10.1016/j.toxlet.2010.01.009.

PMID:
20096756
12.
13.

The spontaneously hypertensive rat as a model of human cardiovascular disease: evidence of exacerbated cardiopulmonary injury and oxidative stress from inhaled emission particulate matter.

Kodavanti UP, Schladweiler MC, Ledbetter AD, Watkinson WP, Campen MJ, Winsett DW, Richards JR, Crissman KM, Hatch GE, Costa DL.

Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 2000 May 1;164(3):250-63.

PMID:
10799335
14.

Composition of air pollution particles and oxidative stress in cells, tissues, and living systems.

Ghio AJ, Carraway MS, Madden MC.

J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2012;15(1):1-21. doi: 10.1080/10937404.2012.632359. Review.

PMID:
22202227
15.

Reactive oxygen species in pulmonary inflammation by ambient particulates.

Tao F, Gonzalez-Flecha B, Kobzik L.

Free Radic Biol Med. 2003 Aug 15;35(4):327-40. Review.

PMID:
12899936
16.

Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and cancer: respirable particulate matter, fibrous dusts and ozone as major causes of lung carcinogenesis through reactive oxygen species mechanisms.

Valavanidis A, Vlachogianni T, Fiotakis K, Loridas S.

Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Aug 27;10(9):3886-907. doi: 10.3390/ijerph10093886. Review.

17.

Free radicals, metals and antioxidants in oxidative stress-induced cancer.

Valko M, Rhodes CJ, Moncol J, Izakovic M, Mazur M.

Chem Biol Interact. 2006 Mar 10;160(1):1-40. Review.

PMID:
16430879
18.

Particle characteristics responsible for effects on human lung epithelial cells.

Aust AE, Ball JC, Hu AA, Lighty JS, Smith KR, Straccia AM, Veranth JM, Young WC.

Res Rep Health Eff Inst. 2002 Dec;(110):1-65; discussion 67-76. Review.

PMID:
12578113
19.

Low doses of urban air particles from Buenos Aires promote oxidative stress and apoptosis in mice lungs.

Martin S, Fernandez-Alanis E, Delfosse V, Evelson P, Yakisich JS, Saldiva PH, Tasat DR.

Inhal Toxicol. 2010 Nov;22(13):1064-71. doi: 10.3109/08958378.2010.523030.

PMID:
21047167
20.

Quinoid redox cycling as a mechanism for sustained free radical generation by inhaled airborne particulate matter.

Squadrito GL, Cueto R, Dellinger B, Pryor WA.

Free Radic Biol Med. 2001 Nov 1;31(9):1132-8. Review.

PMID:
11677046
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