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Items: 1 to 20 of 101

1.

Electronic recording, self-report, and bias in measuring cigarette consumption.

Pierce JP.

Health Psychol. 2009 Sep;28(5):527-8. doi: 10.1037/a0016188. No abstract available.

PMID:
19751077
3.

Relations of cotinine and carbon monoxide to self-reported smoking in a cohort of smokers and ex-smokers followed over 5 years.

Murray RP, Connett JE, Istvan JA, Nides MA, Rempel-Rossum S.

Nicotine Tob Res. 2002 Aug;4(3):287-94.

PMID:
12215237
4.

Exhaled carbon monoxide and urinary cotinine as measures of smoking in pregnancy.

Secker-Walker RH, Vacek PM, Flynn BS, Mead PB.

Addict Behav. 1997 Sep-Oct;22(5):671-84.

PMID:
9347069
5.

Effect of motivational interviewing on smoking cessation in pregnant women.

Karatay G, Kublay G, Emiroğlu ON.

J Adv Nurs. 2010 Jun;66(6):1328-37. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2010.05267.x. Epub 2010 Apr 1.

PMID:
20384640
8.

Detecting smoking following smoking cessation treatment.

Gariti P, Alterman AI, Ehrman R, Mulvaney FD, O'Brien CP.

Drug Alcohol Depend. 2002 Jan 1;65(2):191-6.

PMID:
11772480
9.

Measuring tobacco use in a prison population.

Kauffman RM, Ferketich AK, Murray DM, Bellair PE, Wewers ME.

Nicotine Tob Res. 2010 Jun;12(6):582-8. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntq048. Epub 2010 Apr 15.

10.

Observer reports of smoking status: a replication.

Hughes JR.

J Subst Abuse. 1992;4(4):403-6.

PMID:
1294282
11.

Breath carbon monoxide and semiquantitative saliva cotinine as biomarkers for smoking.

Marrone GF, Paulpillai M, Evans RJ, Singleton EG, Heishman SJ.

Hum Psychopharmacol. 2010 Jan;25(1):80-3. doi: 10.1002/hup.1078.

12.

Thinking and/or doing as strategies for resisting smoking.

O'Connell KA, Hosein VL, Schwartz JE.

Res Nurs Health. 2006 Dec;29(6):533-42.

PMID:
17131277
13.

Sequential combination of self-report, breath carbon monoxide, and saliva cotinine to assess smoking status.

Javors MA, Hatch JP, Lamb RJ.

Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 Jan 15;113(2-3):242-4. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.07.020. Epub 2010 Sep 6.

14.

Accuracy of self-reported smoking cessation during pregnancy.

Tong VT, Althabe F, Alemán A, Johnson CC, Dietz PM, Berrueta M, Morello P, Colomar M, Buekens P, Sosnoff CS; Prenatal Tobacco Cessation Intervention Collaborative:, Farr SL, Mazzoni A, Ciganda A, Becú A, Bittar Gonzalez MG, Llambi L, Gibbons L, Smith RA, Belizán JM.

Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2015 Jan;94(1):106-11. doi: 10.1111/aogs.12532. Epub 2014 Nov 13.

15.

[Validity of smoking measurements during pregnancy: specificity, sensitivity and cut-off points].

Aranda Regules JM, Mateos Vilchez P, González Villalba A, Sanchez F, Luna del Castillo Jde D.

Rev Esp Salud Publica. 2008 Sep-Oct;82(5):535-45. Spanish.

16.
17.

Validity of self-reported smoking habits.

Steffensen FH, Lauritzen T, Sørensen HT.

Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Sep;13(3):236-7. No abstract available.

PMID:
7481178
18.

Collecting saliva by mail for genetic and cotinine analyses in participants recruited through the Internet.

Etter JF, Neidhart E, Bertrand S, Malafosse A, Bertrand D.

Eur J Epidemiol. 2005;20(10):833-8.

PMID:
16283473
19.

Parental smoking cessation and children's smoking--problems of interpretation remain: commentary on Bricker et al.

Jarvis MJ.

Addiction. 2003 May;98(5):597-8, discussion 598-9. No abstract available.

PMID:
12751975
20.

Biochemical validation of self reported quit rates among Buddhist monks in Cambodia.

Yel D, Hallen GK, Sinclair RG, Mom K, Srey CT.

Tob Control. 2005 Oct;14(5):359. No abstract available.

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