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Items: 1 to 20 of 106

1.

Nosocomial contamination of laryngoscope handles: challenging current guidelines.

Call TR, Auerbach FJ, Riddell SW, Kiska DL, Thongrod SC, Tham SW, Nussmeier NA.

Anesth Analg. 2009 Aug;109(2):479-83. doi: 10.1213/ane.0b013e3181ac1080.

2.

Contamination of laryngoscope handles.

Williams D, Dingley J, Jones C, Berry N.

J Hosp Infect. 2010 Feb;74(2):123-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2009.09.015. Epub 2010 Jan 22.

PMID:
20096953
3.

Laryngoscope handles: a potential for infection.

Simmons SA.

AANA J. 2000 Jun;68(3):233-6.

PMID:
11132011
4.

Incidence of visible and occult blood on laryngoscope blades and handles.

Phillips RA, Monaghan WP.

AANA J. 1997 Jun;65(3):241-6.

PMID:
9233093
5.

POSAiDA: presence of Staphylococcus aureus/MRSA and Enterococcus/VRE in Danish ambulances. A cross-sectional study.

Vikke HS, Giebner M.

BMC Res Notes. 2016 Mar 30;9:194. doi: 10.1186/s13104-016-1982-x.

6.

Chlorhexidine to maintain cleanliness of laryngoscope handles: an audit and laboratory study.

Howell V, Thoppil A, Young H, Sharma S, Blunt M, Young P.

Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2013 May;30(5):216-21. doi: 10.1097/EJA.0b013e3283607827.

PMID:
23511956
7.

Computer keyboards and faucet handles as reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens in the intensive care unit.

Bures S, Fishbain JT, Uyehara CF, Parker JM, Berg BW.

Am J Infect Control. 2000 Dec;28(6):465-71.

PMID:
11114617
8.

Laryngoscope blades and handles as sources of cross-infection: an integrative review.

Negri de Sousa AC, Levy CE, Freitas MI.

J Hosp Infect. 2013 Apr;83(4):269-75. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2012.10.015. Epub 2013 Jan 16. Review.

PMID:
23332194
9.
10.

Reassessment of the risk of healthcare-acquired infection during rigid laryngoscopy.

Muscarella LF.

J Hosp Infect. 2008 Feb;68(2):101-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2007.11.004. Epub 2008 Jan 15. Review.

PMID:
18226421
11.

Decontamination of laryngoscope blades: is our practice adequate?

Telang R, Patil V, Ranganathan P, Kelkar R.

J Postgrad Med. 2010 Oct-Dec;56(4):257-61. doi: 10.4103/0022-3859.70930.

12.

Bacterial Contamination and Disinfection Status of Laryngoscopes Stored in Emergency Crash Carts.

Choi JH, Cho YS, Lee JW, Shin HB, Lee IK.

J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):158-164. doi: 10.3961/jpmph.17.013.

13.

Comparison of efficacy and cost-effectiveness of 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde and 2% glutaraldehyde for disinfection of laryngoscopes: A prospective pilot study.

Karnik PP, Dave NM, Nataraj G, Gupta R, Garasia M.

Indian J Anaesth. 2017 Jun;61(6):490-493. doi: 10.4103/ija.IJA_22_17.

14.

Bacterial incidence and antibiotic sensitivity pattern in moderate and severe infections in hospitalised patients.

Ghosh A, Karmakar PS, Pal J, Chakraborty N, Debnath NB, Mukherjee JD.

J Indian Med Assoc. 2009 Jan;107(1):21-2, 24-5.

PMID:
19588683
16.

Microbiological sampling of the forgotten components of a flexible fiberoptic laryngoscope: what lessons can we learn?

Bhatt JM, Peterson EM, Verma SP.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014 Feb;150(2):235-6. doi: 10.1177/0194599813513424. Epub 2013 Dec 13.

PMID:
24334960
17.
18.

Bacterial contamination of re-usable laryngoscope blades during the course of daily anaesthetic practice.

Lowman W, Venter L, Scribante J.

S Afr Med J. 2013 Feb 19;103(6):386-9. doi: 10.7196/samj.6385.

PMID:
23725957
20.

Contamination of room door handles by methicillin-sensitive/methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

Oie S, Hosokawa I, Kamiya A.

J Hosp Infect. 2002 Jun;51(2):140-3.

PMID:
12090803

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