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Items: 1 to 20 of 104

1.

Modulation of apoptosis by early human papillomavirus proteins in cervical cancer.

Lagunas-Martínez A, Madrid-Marina V, Gariglio P.

Biochim Biophys Acta. 2010 Jan;1805(1):6-16. doi: 10.1016/j.bbcan.2009.03.005. Epub 2009 Apr 15. Review.

PMID:
19374936
3.

Tanshinone IIA inhibits viral oncogene expression leading to apoptosis and inhibition of cervical cancer.

Munagala R, Aqil F, Jeyabalan J, Gupta RC.

Cancer Lett. 2015 Jan 28;356(2 Pt B):536-46. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2014.09.037. Epub 2014 Oct 7.

PMID:
25304375
4.
5.

Both Rb and E7 are regulated by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in HPV-containing cervical tumor cells.

Wang J, Sampath A, Raychaudhuri P, Bagchi S.

Oncogene. 2001 Aug 2;20(34):4740-9.

6.

Human papillomavirus 16 E6/E7 transcript and E2 gene status in patients with cervical neoplasia.

Sathish N, Abraham P, Peedicayil A, Sridharan G, John S, Chandy G.

Mol Diagn. 2004;8(1):57-64.

PMID:
15230643
7.

Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein Expression Is Controlled by the Cellular Splicing Factor SRSF2 (SC35).

McFarlane M, MacDonald AI, Stevenson A, Graham SV.

J Virol. 2015 May;89(10):5276-87. doi: 10.1128/JVI.03434-14. Epub 2015 Feb 25.

8.

Antisense targeting human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 genes contributes to apoptosis and senescence in SiHa cervical carcinoma cells.

Sima N, Wang S, Wang W, Kong D, Xu Q, Tian X, Luo A, Zhou J, Xu G, Meng L, Lu Y, Ma D.

Gynecol Oncol. 2007 Aug;106(2):299-304. Epub 2007 Jun 21.

PMID:
17586029
9.

The presence of human papillomavirus-16/-18 E6, p53, and Bcl-2 protein in cervicovaginal smears from patients with invasive cervical cancer.

Pillai MR, Halabi S, McKalip A, Jayaprakash PG, Rajalekshmi TN, Nair MK, Herman B.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 May;5(5):329-35.

10.

DNA aneuploidy and integration of human papillomavirus type 16 e6/e7 oncogenes in intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri.

Melsheimer P, Vinokurova S, Wentzensen N, Bastert G, von Knebel Doeberitz M.

Clin Cancer Res. 2004 May 1;10(9):3059-63.

11.

[Molecular basis of cervical carcinogenesis by high-risk human papillomaviruses].

Yugawa T, Kiyono T.

Uirusu. 2008 Dec;58(2):141-54. Review. Japanese.

12.
13.

Molecular mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis by high-risk human papillomaviruses: novel functions of E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

Yugawa T, Kiyono T.

Rev Med Virol. 2009 Mar;19(2):97-113. doi: 10.1002/rmv.605. Review.

PMID:
19156753
14.

The role of human papillomaviruses in oncogenesis.

Mighty KK, Laimins LA.

Recent Results Cancer Res. 2014;193:135-48. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-38965-8_8. Review.

PMID:
24008297
15.

Potential drugs against cervical cancer: zinc-ejecting inhibitors of the human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncoprotein.

Beerheide W, Bernard HU, Tan YJ, Ganesan A, Rice WG, Ting AE.

J Natl Cancer Inst. 1999 Jul 21;91(14):1211-20.

PMID:
10413422
16.

Induction of the p53-target gene GADD45 in HPV-positive cancer cells.

Butz K, Whitaker N, Denk C, Ullmann A, Geisen C, Hoppe-Seyler F.

Oncogene. 1999 Apr 8;18(14):2381-6.

17.

Anticancer drugs aimed at E6 and E7 activity in HPV-positive cervical cancer.

Tan S, de Vries EG, van der Zee AG, de Jong S.

Curr Cancer Drug Targets. 2012 Feb;12(2):170-84. Review.

PMID:
22165971
18.

MicroRNAs in cervical cancer: evidences for a miRNA profile deregulated by HPV and its impact on radio-resistance.

Pedroza-Torres A, López-Urrutia E, García-Castillo V, Jacobo-Herrera N, Herrera LA, Peralta-Zaragoza O, López-Camarillo C, De Leon DC, Fernández-Retana J, Cerna-Cortés JF, Pérez-Plasencia C.

Molecules. 2014 May 16;19(5):6263-81. doi: 10.3390/molecules19056263. Review.

19.

Cellular targets of the oncoproteins encoded by the cancer associated human papillomaviruses.

Howley PM, Münger K, Romanczuk H, Scheffner M, Huibregtse JM.

Princess Takamatsu Symp. 1991;22:239-48. Review.

PMID:
1668886
20.

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