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Items: 1 to 20 of 133

1.

What use are male hosts? The dynamics of maternally inherited bacteria showing sexual transmission or male killing.

Engelstädter J, Hurst GD.

Am Nat. 2009 May;173(5):E159-70. doi: 10.1086/597375.

PMID:
19272014
2.

Can maternally transmitted endosymbionts facilitate the evolution of haplodiploidy?

Engelstädter J, Hurst GD.

J Evol Biol. 2006 Jan;19(1):194-202.

3.

Adonia variegata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) bears maternally inherited flavobacteria that kill males only.

Hurst GD, Bandi C, Sacchi L, Cochrane AG, Bertrand D, Karaca I, Majerus ME.

Parasitology. 1999 Feb;118 ( Pt 2):125-34.

PMID:
10028525
4.

Sexually transmitted diseases of insects: distribution, evolution, ecology and host behaviour.

Knell RJ, Webberley KM.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2004 Aug;79(3):557-81. Review.

PMID:
15366763
6.

Inherited microorganisms, sex-specific virulence and reproductive parasitism.

Bandi C, Dunn AM, Hurst GD, Rigaud T.

Trends Parasitol. 2001 Feb;17(2):88-94. Review.

PMID:
11228015
7.
8.

The evolution of haplodiploidy by male-killing endosymbionts: importance of population structure and endosymbiont mutualisms.

Kuijper B, Pen I.

J Evol Biol. 2010 Jan;23(1):40-52. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2009.01854.x. Epub 2009 Nov 9.

9.

Intergenomic arms races: detection of a nuclear rescue gene of male-killing in a ladybird.

Majerus TM, Majerus ME.

PLoS Pathog. 2010 Jul 8;6(7):e1000987. doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1000987.

10.

The effect of sibmating on the infection dynamics of male-killing bacteria.

Dannowski J, Flor M, Telschow A, Hammerstein P.

Evolution. 2009 Oct;63(10):2525-34. doi: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00749.x. Epub 2009 Jun 10.

PMID:
19519634
11.

[Wolbachia endosymbionts and their effects on the fitness of the arthropod hosts].

Chu D, Zhang YJ, Bi YP, Fu HB.

Wei Sheng Wu Xue Bao. 2005 Oct;45(5):817-20. Review. Chinese.

PMID:
16342786
12.
13.

Male-killing endosymbionts: influence of environmental conditions on persistence of host metapopulation.

Bonte D, Hovestadt T, Poethke HJ.

BMC Evol Biol. 2008 Sep 2;8:243. doi: 10.1186/1471-2148-8-243.

14.

Diversification of transmission modes and the evolution of mutualism.

Ferdy JB, Godelle B.

Am Nat. 2005 Nov;166(5):613-27. Epub 2005 Sep 9.

PMID:
16224726
15.

The dynamics of sexual conflict over mating rate with endosymbiont infection that affects reproductive phenotypes.

Hayashi TI, Marshall JL, Gavrilets S.

J Evol Biol. 2007 Nov;20(6):2154-64. Epub 2007 Sep 20.

16.

The evolution of endosymbiont density in doubly infected host species.

Engelstädter J, Hammerstein P, Hurst GD.

J Evol Biol. 2007 Mar;20(2):685-95.

17.

The potential role of the X chromosome in the emergence of male-killing from mutualistic endosymbionts.

Unckless RL.

J Theor Biol. 2011 Dec 21;291:99-104. doi: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.09.007. Epub 2011 Sep 21.

PMID:
21959316
18.

A gene's-eye view of symbiont transmission.

Smith J.

Am Nat. 2007 Oct;170(4):542-50. Epub 2007 Aug 15.

PMID:
17891733
19.

Bad guys turned nice? A critical assessment of Wolbachia mutualisms in arthropod hosts.

Zug R, Hammerstein P.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2015 Feb;90(1):89-111. doi: 10.1111/brv.12098. Epub 2014 Mar 11. Review.

20.

The impact of endosymbionts on the evolution of host sex-determination mechanisms.

Cordaux R, Bouchon D, Grève P.

Trends Genet. 2011 Aug;27(8):332-41. doi: 10.1016/j.tig.2011.05.002. Epub 2011 Jun 12. Review.

PMID:
21663992

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