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Items: 1 to 20 of 100

1.

Intact amino acid uptake by northern hardwood and conifer trees.

Gallet-Budynek A, Brzostek E, Rodgers VL, Talbot JM, Hyzy S, Finzi AC.

Oecologia. 2009 May;160(1):129-38. doi: 10.1007/s00442-009-1284-2. Epub 2009 Feb 24.

PMID:
19238450
2.

Plant and soil natural abundance delta (15)N: indicators of relative rates of nitrogen cycling in temperate forest ecosystems.

Templer PH, Arthur MA, Lovett GM, Weathers KC.

Oecologia. 2007 Aug;153(2):399-406. Epub 2007 May 4.

PMID:
17479293
3.

Differential effects of sugar maple, red oak, and hemlock tannins on carbon and nitrogen cycling in temperate forest soils.

Talbot JM, Finzi AC.

Oecologia. 2008 Mar;155(3):583-92. doi: 10.1007/s00442-007-0940-7. Epub 2008 Jan 19.

PMID:
18210159
4.

Amino acid uptake by temperate tree species characteristic of low- and high-fertility habitats.

Scott EE, Rothstein DE.

Oecologia. 2011 Oct;167(2):547-57. doi: 10.1007/s00442-011-2009-x. Epub 2011 May 8.

PMID:
21553264
5.
6.

Fine roots are the dominant source of recalcitrant plant litter in sugar maple-dominated northern hardwood forests.

Xia M, Talhelm AF, Pregitzer KS.

New Phytol. 2015 Nov;208(3):715-26. doi: 10.1111/nph.13494. Epub 2015 Jun 12.

7.

Biomass and morphology of fine roots in temperate broad-leaved forests differing in tree species diversity: is there evidence of below-ground overyielding?

Meinen C, Hertel D, Leuschner C.

Oecologia. 2009 Aug;161(1):99-111. doi: 10.1007/s00442-009-1352-7. Epub 2009 May 5.

8.

Organic and inorganic nitrogen uptake by 21 dominant tree species in temperate and tropical forests.

Liu M, Li C, Xu X, Wanek W, Jiang N, Wang H, Yang X.

Tree Physiol. 2017 Nov 1;37(11):1515-1526. doi: 10.1093/treephys/tpx046.

PMID:
28482109
9.

Oak loss increases foliar nitrogen, δ(15)N and growth rates of Betula lenta in a northern temperate deciduous forest.

Falxa-Raymond N, Patterson AE, Schuster WS, Griffin KL.

Tree Physiol. 2012 Sep;32(9):1092-101. doi: 10.1093/treephys/tps068. Epub 2012 Jul 31.

PMID:
22851552
10.

Competition for nitrogen between European beech and sycamore maple shifts in favour of beech with decreasing light availability.

Simon J, Li X, Rennenberg H.

Tree Physiol. 2014 Jan;34(1):49-60. doi: 10.1093/treephys/tpt112. Epub 2014 Jan 2.

PMID:
24391164
11.

Dynamics of nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon at the Hubbard brook experimental forest.

Dittman JA, Driscoll CT, Groffman PM, Fahey TJ.

Ecology. 2007 May;88(5):1153-66.

PMID:
17536402
12.

Uptake of nitrate, ammonium and glycine by plants of Tasmanian wet eucalypt forests.

Warren CR, Adams PR.

Tree Physiol. 2007 Mar;27(3):413-9.

PMID:
17241983
13.

Post-uptake metabolism affects quantification of amino acid uptake.

Warren CR.

New Phytol. 2012 Jan;193(2):522-31. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2011.03933.x. Epub 2011 Oct 18.

14.
15.
16.

Competition for nitrogen sources between European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) seedlings.

Simon J, Waldhecker P, Brüggemann N, Rennenberg H.

Plant Biol (Stuttg). 2010 May 1;12(3):453-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1438-8677.2009.00225.x.

PMID:
20522181
17.

Decomposition and nitrogen dynamics of (15)N-labeled leaf, root, and twig litter in temperate coniferous forests.

van Huysen TL, Harmon ME, Perakis SS, Chen H.

Oecologia. 2013 Dec;173(4):1563-73. doi: 10.1007/s00442-013-2706-8. Epub 2013 Jul 25.

PMID:
23884664
18.

Impacts of fine root turnover on forest NPP and soil C sequestration potential.

Matamala R, Gonzàlez-Meler MA, Jastrow JD, Norby RJ, Schlesinger WH.

Science. 2003 Nov 21;302(5649):1385-7.

19.

Plant-available organic and mineral nitrogen shift in dominance with forest stand age.

LeDuc SD, Rothstein DE.

Ecology. 2010 Mar;91(3):708-20.

PMID:
20426330
20.

Belowground fate of (15)N injected into sweetgum trees (Liquidambar styraciflua) at the ORNL FACE Experiment.

Garten CT Jr, Brice DJ.

Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom. 2009 Oct;23(19):3094-100. doi: 10.1002/rcm.4227.

PMID:
19705377

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