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Items: 1 to 20 of 93

1.

Making it to the synapse: measles virus spread in and among neurons.

Young VA, Rall GF.

Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. 2009;330:3-30. Review.

2.

A mouse model of persistent brain infection with recombinant Measles virus.

Schubert S, Möller-Ehrlich K, Singethan K, Wiese S, Duprex WP, Rima BK, Niewiesk S, Schneider-Schaulies J.

J Gen Virol. 2006 Jul;87(Pt 7):2011-9.

PMID:
16760404
3.

Pathological consequences of systemic measles virus infection.

Ludlow M, McQuaid S, Milner D, de Swart RL, Duprex WP.

J Pathol. 2015 Jan;235(2):253-65. doi: 10.1002/path.4457. Review.

PMID:
25294240
4.

Measles virus mutants possessing the fusion protein with enhanced fusion activity spread effectively in neuronal cells, but not in other cells, without causing strong cytopathology.

Watanabe S, Ohno S, Shirogane Y, Suzuki SO, Koga R, Yanagi Y.

J Virol. 2015 Mar;89(5):2710-7. doi: 10.1128/JVI.03346-14. Epub 2014 Dec 17.

5.

Pathogenic aspects of measles virus infections.

Schneider-Schaulies S, ter Meulen V.

Arch Virol Suppl. 1999;15:139-58. Review.

PMID:
10470275
6.

Measles virus 1998-2002: progress and controversy.

Rall GF.

Annu Rev Microbiol. 2003;57:343-67. Review.

PMID:
14527283
7.

Pathogenetic aspects of measles virus infections.

Schneider-Schaulies J, Dunster LM, Schneider-Schaulies S, ter Meulen V.

Vet Microbiol. 1995 May;44(2-4):113-25. Review.

PMID:
8588304
8.

Measles virus infection and replication in undifferentiated and differentiated human neuronal cells in culture.

McQuaid S, Campbell S, Wallace IJ, Kirk J, Cosby SL.

J Virol. 1998 Jun;72(6):5245-50.

9.
10.

Bst2/Tetherin Is Induced in Neurons by Type I Interferon and Viral Infection but Is Dispensable for Protection against Neurotropic Viral Challenge.

Holmgren AM, Miller KD, Cavanaugh SE, Rall GF.

J Virol. 2015 Nov;89(21):11011-8. doi: 10.1128/JVI.01745-15. Epub 2015 Aug 26.

11.

Neurokinin-1 enables measles virus trans-synaptic spread in neurons.

Makhortova NR, Askovich P, Patterson CE, Gechman LA, Gerard NP, Rall GF.

Virology. 2007 May 25;362(1):235-44. Epub 2007 Apr 16.

12.

V and C proteins of measles virus function as virulence factors in vivo.

Patterson JB, Thomas D, Lewicki H, Billeter MA, Oldstone MB.

Virology. 2000 Feb 1;267(1):80-9.

13.

Model Systems: transgenic mouse models for measles pathogenesis.

Manchester M, Rall GF.

Trends Microbiol. 2001 Jan;9(1):19-23. Review.

PMID:
11166238
14.
15.

Blue moon neurovirology: the merits of studying rare CNS diseases of viral origin.

O'Donnell LA, Rall GF.

J Neuroimmune Pharmacol. 2010 Sep;5(3):443-55. doi: 10.1007/s11481-010-9200-4. Epub 2010 Apr 24. Review.

PMID:
20419352
16.

Persistent measles virus infection of mouse neural cells lacking known human entry receptors.

Abdullah H, Earle JA, Gardiner TA, Tangy F, Cosby SL.

Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol. 2009 Oct;35(5):473-86. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2990.2009.01023.x.

PMID:
19490430
17.

The H gene of rodent brain-adapted measles virus confers neurovirulence to the Edmonston vaccine strain.

Duprex WP, Duffy I, McQuaid S, Hamill L, Cosby SL, Billeter MA, Schneider-Schaulies J, ter Meulen V, Rima BK.

J Virol. 1999 Aug;73(8):6916-22.

18.

Disease model: dissecting the pathogenesis of the measles virus.

Patterson JB, Manchester M, Oldstone MB.

Trends Mol Med. 2001 Feb;7(2):85-8. Review. Erratum in: Trends Mol Med 2001 May;7(5):231.

PMID:
11286761
19.

A transgenic mouse model for measles virus infection of the brain.

Rall GF, Manchester M, Daniels LR, Callahan EM, Belman AR, Oldstone MB.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1997 Apr 29;94(9):4659-63.

20.

Measles infection of the central nervous system.

Schneider-Schaulies J, Meulen Vt, Schneider-Schaulies S.

J Neurovirol. 2003 Apr;9(2):247-52. Review.

PMID:
12707855
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