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Items: 1 to 20 of 272

1.

Anesthetics discriminate between tonic and phasic gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on hippocampal CA1 neurons.

Bieda MC, Su H, Maciver MB.

Anesth Analg. 2009 Feb;108(2):484-90. doi: 10.1213/ane.0b013e3181904571.

2.

Anesthetic agent-specific effects on synaptic inhibition.

MacIver MB.

Anesth Analg. 2014 Sep;119(3):558-69. doi: 10.1213/ANE.0000000000000321.

3.
4.

Major role for tonic GABAA conductances in anesthetic suppression of intrinsic neuronal excitability.

Bieda MC, MacIver MB.

J Neurophysiol. 2004 Sep;92(3):1658-67. Epub 2004 May 12.

5.
6.

GABA(A) receptor blockade antagonizes the immobilizing action of propofol but not ketamine or isoflurane in a dose-related manner.

Sonner JM, Zhang Y, Stabernack C, Abaigar W, Xing Y, Laster MJ.

Anesth Analg. 2003 Mar;96(3):706-12, table of contents.

PMID:
12598250
7.

Abused inhalants enhance GABA-mediated synaptic inhibition.

MacIver MB.

Neuropsychopharmacology. 2009 Sep;34(10):2296-304. doi: 10.1038/npp.2009.57. Epub 2009 Jun 3.

8.

Effects of small concentrations of volatile anesthetics on action potential firing of neocortical neurons in vitro.

Antkowiak B, Helfrich-Förster C.

Anesthesiology. 1998 Jun;88(6):1592-605.

PMID:
9637654
9.
10.

Volatile anesthetics depress glutamate transmission via presynaptic actions.

Maclver MB, Mikulec AA, Amagasu SM, Monroe FA.

Anesthesiology. 1996 Oct;85(4):823-34.

PMID:
8873553
11.

Presynaptic actions of propofol enhance inhibitory synaptic transmission in isolated solitary tract nucleus neurons.

Jin YH, Zhang Z, Mendelowitz D, Andresen MC.

Brain Res. 2009 Aug 25;1286:75-83. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2009.06.058. Epub 2009 Jun 25.

12.

Multiple types of GABAA receptors mediate inhibition in brain stem parasympathetic cardiac neurons in the nucleus ambiguus.

Bouairi E, Kamendi H, Wang X, Gorini C, Mendelowitz D.

J Neurophysiol. 2006 Dec;96(6):3266-72. Epub 2006 Aug 16.

13.

Anesthetic-induced burst suppression EEG activity requires glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission.

Lukatch HS, Kiddoo CE, Maciver MB.

Cereb Cortex. 2005 Sep;15(9):1322-31. Epub 2005 Jan 12.

PMID:
15647528
14.

Volatile anesthetic effects on isolated GABA synapses and extrasynaptic receptors.

Ogawa SK, Tanaka E, Shin MC, Kotani N, Akaike N.

Neuropharmacology. 2011 Mar;60(4):701-10. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2010.11.016. Epub 2010 Nov 25.

PMID:
21111749
15.

Depression of spinal network activity by thiopental: shift from phasic to tonic GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibition.

Grasshoff C, Netzhammer N, Schweizer J, Antkowiak B, Hentschke H.

Neuropharmacology. 2008 Oct;55(5):793-802. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2008.06.026. Epub 2008 Jun 21.

PMID:
18619475
16.
17.

Neuroprotection by propofol in acute mechanical injury: role of GABAergic inhibition.

Hollrigel GS, Toth K, Soltesz I.

J Neurophysiol. 1996 Oct;76(4):2412-22.

PMID:
8899614
18.
19.

Synaptic mechanisms of thiopental-induced alterations in synchronized cortical activity.

Lukatch HS, MacIver MB.

Anesthesiology. 1996 Jun;84(6):1425-34.

PMID:
8669684
20.

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