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Items: 1 to 20 of 108

1.

Suppression of Th2 cytokines reduces tick-transmitted Borrelia burgdorferi load in mice.

Zeidner NS, Schneider BS, Rutherford JS, Dolan MC.

J Parasitol. 2008 Jun;94(3):767-9. doi: 10.1645/GE-1416.1.

PMID:
18605798
2.

Tick saliva affects both proliferation and distribution of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes in mouse organs and increases transmission of spirochetes to ticks.

Horká H, Cerná-Kýcková K, Skallová A, Kopecký J.

Int J Med Microbiol. 2009 Jun;299(5):373-80. doi: 10.1016/j.ijmm.2008.10.009. Epub 2009 Jan 15.

PMID:
19147403
3.

Tick saliva represses innate immunity and cutaneous inflammation in a murine model of Lyme disease.

Kern A, Collin E, Barthel C, Michel C, Jaulhac B, Boulanger N.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2011 Oct;11(10):1343-50. doi: 10.1089/vbz.2010.0197. Epub 2011 May 25.

PMID:
21612525
5.

Feeding by the tick, Ixodes scapularis, causes CD4(+) T cells responding to cognate antigen to develop the capacity to express IL-4.

Müller-Doblies UU, Maxwell SS, Boppana VD, Mihalyo MA, McSorley SJ, Vella AT, Adler AJ, Wikel SK.

Parasite Immunol. 2007 Oct;29(10):485-99.

7.

Arthropod- and host-specific Borrelia burgdorferi bbk32 expression and the inhibition of spirochete transmission.

Fikrig E, Feng W, Barthold SW, Telford SR 3rd, Flavell RA.

J Immunol. 2000 May 15;164(10):5344-51.

8.

Lyme borreliosis vaccination: the facts, the challenge, the future.

Schuijt TJ, Hovius JW, van der Poll T, van Dam AP, Fikrig E.

Trends Parasitol. 2011 Jan;27(1):40-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pt.2010.06.006. Epub 2010 Jun 30. Review.

PMID:
20594913
9.

Interaction of primary mast cells with Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu stricto): role in transmission and dissemination in C57BL/6 mice.

Bernard Q, Wang Z, Di Nardo A, Boulanger N.

Parasit Vectors. 2017 Jun 27;10(1):313. doi: 10.1186/s13071-017-2243-0.

10.

Prevention of Borrelia burgdorferi transmission in guinea pigs by tick immunity.

Nazario S, Das S, de Silva AM, Deponte K, Marcantonio N, Anderson JF, Fish D, Fikrig E, Kantor FS.

Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1998 Jun;58(6):780-5.

PMID:
9660463
11.

Pathophysiology of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, in ixodid ticks.

Burgdorfer W, Hayes SF, Corwin D.

Rev Infect Dis. 1989 Sep-Oct;11 Suppl 6:S1442-50. Review.

PMID:
2682956
12.
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16.

Comparison of disseminated and nondisseminated strains of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto in mice naturally infected by tick bite.

Dolan MC, Piesman J, Schneider BS, Schriefer M, Brandt K, Zeidner NS.

Infect Immun. 2004 Sep;72(9):5262-6.

17.

Tick-host-pathogen interactions in Lyme borreliosis.

Hovius JW, van Dam AP, Fikrig E.

Trends Parasitol. 2007 Sep;23(9):434-8. Epub 2007 Jul 25. Review.

PMID:
17656156
18.

MyD88 deficiency enhances acquisition and transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi by Ixodes scapularis ticks.

Bockenstedt LK, Liu N, Schwartz I, Fish D.

Infect Immun. 2006 Apr;74(4):2154-60.

19.

Susceptibility of the black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis, to the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi.

Burgdorfer W, Gage KL.

Zentralbl Bakteriol Mikrobiol Hyg A. 1986 Dec;263(1-2):15-20.

PMID:
3577477
20.

Antigens from Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks elicit potent cell-mediated immune responses in resistant but not in susceptible animals.

Ferreira BR, Szabó MJ, Cavassani KA, Bechara GH, Silva JS.

Vet Parasitol. 2003 Jul 10;115(1):35-48.

PMID:
12860066

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