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Items: 1 to 20 of 140

1.

Participation in dementia research: rates and correlates of capacity to give informed consent.

Warner J, McCarney R, Griffin M, Hill K, Fisher P.

J Med Ethics. 2008 Mar;34(3):167-70. doi: 10.1136/jme.2006.019786.

PMID:
18316457
2.
4.

What do our patients understand about their trial participation? Assessing patients' understanding of their informed consent consultation about randomised clinical trials.

Behrendt C, Gölz T, Roesler C, Bertz H, Wünsch A.

J Med Ethics. 2011 Feb;37(2):74-80. doi: 10.1136/jme.2010.035485. Epub 2010 Nov 23.

PMID:
21098797
5.

Preservation of the capacity to appoint a proxy decision maker: implications for dementia research.

Kim SY, Karlawish JH, Kim HM, Wall IF, Bozoki AC, Appelbaum PS.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;68(2):214-20. doi: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2010.191.

6.

Ginkgo biloba for mild to moderate dementia in a community setting: a pragmatic, randomised, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

McCarney R, Fisher P, Iliffe S, van Haselen R, Griffin M, van der Meulen J, Warner J.

Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Dec;23(12):1222-30. doi: 10.1002/gps.2055.

PMID:
18537221
7.

Capacity of persons with mental retardation to consent to participate in randomized clinical trials.

Fisher CB, Cea CD, Davidson PW, Fried AL.

Am J Psychiatry. 2006 Oct;163(10):1813-20.

PMID:
17012694
8.

The efficacy of ginkgo for elderly people with dementia and age-associated memory impairment: new results of a randomized clinical trial.

van Dongen MC, van Rossum E, Kessels AG, Sielhorst HJ, Knipschild PG.

J Am Geriatr Soc. 2000 Oct;48(10):1183-94.

PMID:
11037003
9.

Effects of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761 on neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia: findings from a randomised controlled trial.

Scripnikov A, Khomenko A, Napryeyenko O; GINDEM-NP Study Group.

Wien Med Wochenschr. 2007;157(13-14):295-300.

PMID:
17704975
10.

Safeguarding research participants who lack decision-making capacity.

Griffith R.

Br J Nurs. 2016 Jul 14;25(13):766-7. doi: 10.12968/bjon.2016.25.13.766.

PMID:
27409789
11.

I don't like that, it's tricking people too much...: acute informed consent to participation in a trial of thrombolysis for stroke.

Mangset M, Førde R, Nessa J, Berge E, Wyller TB.

J Med Ethics. 2008 Oct;34(10):751-6. doi: 10.1136/jme.2007.023168.

PMID:
18827109
12.

Conflicting results on ginkgo research.

Le Bars P.

Forsch Komplementarmed Klass Naturheilkd. 2002 Feb;9(1):19-20. No abstract available.

PMID:
11968151
13.

Informed consent for research involving people with dementia: a grey area.

Cubit K.

Contemp Nurse. 2010 Feb-Mar;34(2):230-6. doi: 10.5172/conu.2010.34.2.230.

PMID:
20509807
15.

Can adults with cognitive impairment consent to take part in research?

Donnelly J.

J Wound Care. 2004 Jul;13(7):257-62. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
15977765
16.

[External validity of clinical trials for treatment of dementia with ginkgo biloba extracts].

Bornhöft G, Maxion-Bergemann S, Matthiessen PF.

Z Gerontol Geriatr. 2008 Aug;41(4):298-312. doi: 10.1007/s00391-008-0521-3. Epub 2008 Mar 11. Review. German. Erratum in: Z Gerontol Geriatr. 2008 Aug;41(4):313.

PMID:
18327688
17.

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of two doses of Ginkgo biloba extract in dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

Schneider LS, DeKosky ST, Farlow MR, Tariot PN, Hoerr R, Kieser M.

Curr Alzheimer Res. 2005 Dec;2(5):541-51.

PMID:
16375657
18.

Ginkgo biloba for cognitive impairment and dementia.

Birks J, Grimley Evans J.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009 Jan 21;(1):CD003120. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD003120.pub3. Review.

PMID:
19160216
19.
20.

Research with Alzheimer's disease subjects: informed consent and proxy decision making.

High DM.

J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Sep;40(9):950-7. Review.

PMID:
1512393

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