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Items: 1 to 20 of 255

1.

University students' perceptions of the alcohol campaign: "Is Getting Pissed Getting Pathetic? (Just Ask Your Friends)".

Ricciardelli LA, McCabe MP.

Addict Behav. 2008 Feb;33(2):366-72. Epub 2007 Sep 29.

PMID:
18029103
2.

Marketing a hard-to-swallow message: recommendations for the design of media campaigns to increase awareness about the risks of binge drinking.

Jack SM, Bouck LM, Beynon CE, Ciliska DK, Mitchell MJ.

Can J Public Health. 2005 May-Jun;96(3):189-93.

PMID:
15913082
4.
5.

Are social norms campaigns really magic bullets? assessing the effects of students' misperceptions on drinking behavior.

Campo S, Brossard D, Frazer MS, Marchell T, Lewis D, Talbot J.

Health Commun. 2003;15(4):481-97.

PMID:
14527868
6.

The relationship of parental reinforcement of media messages to college students' alcohol-related behaviors.

Weintraub Austin E, Chen YJ.

J Health Commun. 2003 Mar-Apr;8(2):157-69.

PMID:
12746039
7.

A qualitative study of college student responses to conflicting messages in advertising: anti-binge drinking public service announcements versus wine promotion health messages.

Ahn HY, Wu L, Kelly S, Haley E.

Int J Public Health. 2011 Jun;56(3):271-9. doi: 10.1007/s00038-010-0217-5. Epub 2010 Dec 1.

PMID:
21120577
8.
9.

College students' estimation and accuracy of other students' drinking and believability of advertisements featured in a social norms campaign.

Park HS, Smith SW, Klein KA, Martell D.

J Health Commun. 2011 May;16(5):504-18. doi: 10.1080/10810730.2010.546481.

PMID:
21298586
10.

Done 4: analysis of a failed social norms marketing campaign.

Russell CA, Clapp JD, Dejong W.

Health Commun. 2005;17(1):57-65.

PMID:
15590342
11.

A close look at why one social norms campaign did not reduce student drinking.

Thombs DL, Dotterer S, Olds RS, Sharp KE, Raub CG.

J Am Coll Health. 2004 Sep-Oct;53(2):61-8.

PMID:
15495882
12.

Segmenting and targeting American university students to promote responsible alcohol use: a case for applying social marketing principles.

Deshpande S, Rundle-Thiele S.

Health Mark Q. 2011 Oct;28(4):287-303. doi: 10.1080/07359683.2011.623094.

PMID:
22054026
13.

Reducing DUI among US college students: results of an environmental prevention trial.

Clapp JD, Johnson M, Voas RB, Lange JE, Shillington A, Russell C.

Addiction. 2005 Mar;100(3):327-34.

PMID:
15733246
14.

A multisite randomized trial of social norms marketing campaigns to reduce college student drinking.

DeJong W, Schneider SK, Towvim LG, Murphy MJ, Doerr EE, Simonsen NR, Mason KE, Scribner RA.

J Stud Alcohol. 2006 Nov;67(6):868-79.

PMID:
17061004
15.

Biases in the perceptions of the consequences of alcohol use among college students.

Baer JS, Carney MM.

J Stud Alcohol. 1993 Jan;54(1):54-60.

PMID:
8355500
16.

Differential effects of exposure to social norms campaigns: a cause for concern.

Campo S, Cameron KA.

Health Commun. 2006;19(3):209-19.

PMID:
16719724
17.

The role of mass media campaigns in reducing high-risk drinking among college students.

DeJong W.

J Stud Alcohol Suppl. 2002 Mar;(14):182-92. Review.

PMID:
12022724
18.

Initial outcomes of the VERB campaign: tweens' awareness and understanding of campaign messages.

Huhman M, Bauman A, Bowles HR.

Am J Prev Med. 2008 Jun;34(6 Suppl):S241-8. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2008.03.006.

PMID:
18471604
19.

Evaluation of a social norms marketing campaign to reduce high-risk drinking at The University of Mississippi.

Gomberg L, Schneider SK, DeJong W.

Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2001 May;27(2):375-89.

PMID:
11417945
20.

A paid radio advertising campaign to promote parent-child communication about alcohol.

Surkan PJ, Dejong W, Herr-Zaya KM, Rodriguez-Howard M, Fay K.

J Health Commun. 2003 Sep-Oct;8(5):489-95.

PMID:
14530150

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