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Items: 1 to 20 of 527

1.

Papillomavirus E6 and E7 proteins and their cellular targets.

Wise-Draper TM, Wells SI.

Front Biosci. 2008 Jan 1;13:1003-17. Review.

PMID:
17981607
2.

Molecular mechanism of carcinogenesis by human papillomavirus-16.

Ishiji T.

J Dermatol. 2000 Feb;27(2):73-86. Review.

PMID:
10721654
3.

Interaction of viral oncoproteins with cellular target molecules: infection with high-risk vs low-risk human papillomaviruses.

Pim D, Banks L.

APMIS. 2010 Jun;118(6-7):471-93. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0463.2010.02618.x. Review.

PMID:
20553529
4.

Cellular targets of the oncoproteins encoded by the cancer associated human papillomaviruses.

Howley PM, Münger K, Romanczuk H, Scheffner M, Huibregtse JM.

Princess Takamatsu Symp. 1991;22:239-48. Review.

PMID:
1668886
5.

Interactions of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins with tumour suppressor gene products.

Münger K, Scheffner M, Huibregtse JM, Howley PM.

Cancer Surv. 1992;12:197-217. Review.

PMID:
1322242
6.

Reversible repression of papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical carcinoma cells: consequences for the phenotype and E6-p53 and E7-pRB interactions.

von Knebel Doeberitz M, Rittmüller C, Aengeneyndt F, Jansen-Dürr P, Spitkovsky D.

J Virol. 1994 May;68(5):2811-21.

7.

Protein intrinsic disorder and human papillomaviruses: increased amount of disorder in E6 and E7 oncoproteins from high risk HPVs.

Uversky VN, Roman A, Oldfield CJ, Dunker AK.

J Proteome Res. 2006 Aug;5(8):1829-42.

PMID:
16889404
8.

[Molecular basis of cervical carcinogenesis by high-risk human papillomaviruses].

Yugawa T, Kiyono T.

Uirusu. 2008 Dec;58(2):141-54. Review. Japanese.

9.

Molecular mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis by high-risk human papillomaviruses: novel functions of E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

Yugawa T, Kiyono T.

Rev Med Virol. 2009 Mar;19(2):97-113. doi: 10.1002/rmv.605. Review.

PMID:
19156753
10.

Human papillomavirus immortalization and transformation functions.

Münger K, Howley PM.

Virus Res. 2002 Nov;89(2):213-28. Review.

PMID:
12445661
11.
12.

Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins as risk factors for tumorigenesis.

Ganguly N, Parihar SP.

J Biosci. 2009 Mar;34(1):113-23. Review.

13.

Effects of HPV-16 E5, E6 and E7 proteins on survival, adhesion, migration and invasion of trophoblastic cells.

Boulenouar S, Weyn C, Van Noppen M, Moussa Ali M, Favre M, Delvenne PO, Bex F, Noël A, Englert Y, Fontaine V.

Carcinogenesis. 2010 Mar;31(3):473-80. doi: 10.1093/carcin/bgp281. Epub 2009 Nov 16.

15.

Control of interferon signaling in human papillomavirus infection.

Koromilas AE, Li S, Matlashewski G.

Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 2001 Jun-Sep;12(2-3):157-70. Review.

PMID:
11325599
16.

Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 proteins inhibit differentiation-dependent expression of transforming growth factor-beta2 in cervical keratinocytes.

Nees M, Geoghegan JM, Munson P, Prabhu V, Liu Y, Androphy E, Woodworth CD.

Cancer Res. 2000 Aug 1;60(15):4289-98.

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19.

The oncogenic role of human papillomavirus proteins.

Barbosa MS.

Crit Rev Oncog. 1996;7(1-2):1-18. Review.

PMID:
9109494
20.

The biological properties of E6 and E7 oncoproteins from human papillomaviruses.

Ghittoni R, Accardi R, Hasan U, Gheit T, Sylla B, Tommasino M.

Virus Genes. 2010 Feb;40(1):1-13. doi: 10.1007/s11262-009-0412-8. Epub 2009 Oct 17. Review.

PMID:
19838783

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