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Items: 1 to 20 of 124

1.

Nutrigenomics of taste - impact on food preferences and food production.

El-Sohemy A, Stewart L, Khataan N, Fontaine-Bisson B, Kwong P, Ozsungur S, Cornelis MC.

Forum Nutr. 2007;60:176-82. Review.

PMID:
17684414
2.

Genetic and environmental determinants of bitter perception and sweet preferences.

Mennella JA, Pepino MY, Reed DR.

Pediatrics. 2005 Feb;115(2):e216-22.

3.

Impact of genetic and environmental determinants of taste with food preferences in older adults.

Navarro-Allende A, Khataan N, El-Sohemy A.

J Nutr Elder. 2008;27(3-4):267-76. Review.

PMID:
19042575
4.

PROP taster status and self-perceived food adventurousness influence food preferences.

Ullrich NV, Touger-Decker R, O'sullivan-Maillet J, Tepper BJ.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2004 Apr;104(4):543-9.

PMID:
15054337
5.

Genetic variation in taste sensitivity to 6-n-propylthiouracil and its relationship to taste perception and food selection.

Tepper BJ, White EA, Koelliker Y, Lanzara C, d'Adamo P, Gasparini P.

Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2009 Jul;1170:126-39. doi: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.03916.x. Review.

PMID:
19686122
6.

Genetic variation in bitter taste receptor gene TAS2R38, PROP taster status and their association with body mass index and food preferences in Indian population.

Deshaware S, Singhal R.

Gene. 2017 Sep 5;627:363-368. doi: 10.1016/j.gene.2017.06.047. Epub 2017 Jun 23.

PMID:
28652185
7.

The influence of genetic taste markers on food acceptance.

Drewnowski A, Rock CL.

Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Sep;62(3):506-11. Review.

PMID:
7661111
8.

Variation in the Ability to Taste Bitter Thiourea Compounds: Implications for Food Acceptance, Dietary Intake, and Obesity Risk in Children.

Keller KL, Adise S.

Annu Rev Nutr. 2016 Jul 17;36:157-82. doi: 10.1146/annurev-nutr-071715-050916. Epub 2016 Apr 6. Review.

PMID:
27070900
9.

Nutritional implications of genetic taste variation: the role of PROP sensitivity and other taste phenotypes.

Tepper BJ.

Annu Rev Nutr. 2008;28:367-88. doi: 10.1146/annurev.nutr.28.061807.155458. Review.

PMID:
18407743
10.

PTC/PROP tasting: anatomy, psychophysics, and sex effects.

Bartoshuk LM, Duffy VB, Miller IJ.

Physiol Behav. 1994 Dec;56(6):1165-71. Review. Erratum in: Physiol Behav 1995 Jul;58(1):203.

PMID:
7878086
11.
12.

The molecular basis of individual differences in phenylthiocarbamide and propylthiouracil bitterness perception.

Bufe B, Breslin PA, Kuhn C, Reed DR, Tharp CD, Slack JP, Kim UK, Drayna D, Meyerhof W.

Curr Biol. 2005 Feb 22;15(4):322-7.

13.

Taste sensitivities to PROP and PTC vary independently in mice.

Nelson TM, Munger SD, Boughter JD Jr.

Chem Senses. 2003 Oct;28(8):695-704.

PMID:
14627538
14.
16.
17.

Bitter taste study in a sardinian genetic isolate supports the association of phenylthiocarbamide sensitivity to the TAS2R38 bitter receptor gene.

Prodi DA, Drayna D, Forabosco P, Palmas MA, Maestrale GB, Piras D, Pirastu M, Angius A.

Chem Senses. 2004 Oct;29(8):697-702.

PMID:
15466815
18.

Children's food preferences and genetic sensitivity to the bitter taste of 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP).

Anliker JA, Bartoshuk L, Ferris AM, Hooks LD.

Am J Clin Nutr. 1991 Aug;54(2):316-20.

PMID:
1858695
19.

A rapid screening method for the identification of a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the carbonic anhydrase VI gene in studies of sensitivity to the bitter taste of 6-n-propylthiouracil.

Barbarossa IT, Atzori E, Zonza A, Padiglia A.

Genet Test Mol Biomarkers. 2011 Oct;15(10):721-4. doi: 10.1089/gtmb.2011.0040. Epub 2011 Jun 1.

PMID:
21631296

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