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Items: 1 to 20 of 184

1.

Phenotypic plasticity of native vs. invasive purple loosestrife: a two-state multivariate approach.

Chun YJ, Collyer ML, Moloney KA, Nason JD.

Ecology. 2007 Jun;88(6):1499-512.

PMID:
17601142
2.

Comparison of quantitative and molecular genetic variation of native vs. invasive populations of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L., Lythraceae).

Chun YJ, Nason JD, Moloney KA.

Mol Ecol. 2009 Jul;18(14):3020-35. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04254.x. Epub 2009 Jun 22.

PMID:
19548895
3.
5.

Different gardens, different results: native and introduced populations exhibit contrasting phenotypes across common gardens.

Williams JL, Auge H, Maron JL.

Oecologia. 2008 Aug;157(2):239-48. doi: 10.1007/s00442-008-1075-1. Epub 2008 Jun 12.

PMID:
18548283
6.

Population divergence along lines of genetic variance and covariance in the invasive plant Lythrum salicaria in eastern North America.

Colautti RI, Barrett SC.

Evolution. 2011 Sep;65(9):2514-29. doi: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01313.x. Epub 2011 May 3.

PMID:
21884053
7.
8.

Effects of lead contamination on the growth of lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife).

Uveges JL, Corbett AL, Mal TK.

Environ Pollut. 2002;120(2):319-23.

PMID:
12395845
9.

Jack of all trades, master of some? On the role of phenotypic plasticity in plant invasions.

Richards CL, Bossdorf O, Muth NZ, Gurevitch J, Pigliucci M.

Ecol Lett. 2006 Aug;9(8):981-93.

PMID:
16913942
10.

Response to enemies in the invasive plant Lythrum salicaria is genetically determined.

Joshi S, Tielbörger K.

Ann Bot. 2012 Nov;110(7):1403-10. doi: 10.1093/aob/mcs076. Epub 2012 Apr 6.

11.

Evidence of hybridization between Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) and L. alatum (winged loosestrife) in North America.

Houghton-Thompson J, Prince HH, Smith JJ, Hancock JF.

Ann Bot. 2005 Oct;96(5):877-85. Epub 2005 Aug 4.

12.

Phenotypic and genetic differentiation between native and introduced plant populations.

Bossdorf O, Auge H, Lafuma L, Rogers WE, Siemann E, Prati D.

Oecologia. 2005 Jun;144(1):1-11. Epub 2005 May 11. Review.

PMID:
15891837
13.
15.

Why only tetraploid Solidago gigantea (Asteraceae) became invasive: a common garden comparison of ploidy levels.

Schlaepfer DR, Edwards PJ, Billeter R.

Oecologia. 2010 Jul;163(3):661-73. doi: 10.1007/s00442-010-1595-3. Epub 2010 Mar 18.

PMID:
20238128
16.

A change in climate causes rapid evolution of multiple life-history traits and their interactions in an annual plant.

Franks SJ, Weis AE.

J Evol Biol. 2008 Sep;21(5):1321-34. doi: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2008.01566.x. Epub 2008 Jun 28.

17.

Phenotypic plasticity of reproductive effort in a colonial ascidian, Botryllus schlosseri.

Newlon AW 3rd, Yund PO, Stewart-Savage J.

J Exp Zool A Comp Exp Biol. 2003 Jun 1;297(2):180-8.

PMID:
12945754
18.

Negative per capita effects of two invasive plants, Lythrum salicaria and Phalaris arundinacea, on the moth diversity of wetland communities.

Schooler SS, McEvoy PB, Hammond P, Coombs EM.

Bull Entomol Res. 2009 Jun;99(3):229-43. doi: 10.1017/S0007485308006251. Epub 2008 Oct 24.

PMID:
18947450
19.

Genetic variation and local adaptation at a cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) invasion edge in western Nevada.

Leger EA, Espeland EK, Merrill KR, Meyer SE.

Mol Ecol. 2009 Nov;18(21):4366-79. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04357.x. Epub 2009 Sep 21.

PMID:
19769691
20.

Matrix habitat and plant damage influence colonization of purple loosestrife patches by specialist leaf-beetles.

Dávalos A, Blossey B.

Environ Entomol. 2011 Oct;40(5):1074-80. doi: 10.1603/EN11085.

PMID:
22251719

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