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Items: 1 to 20 of 112

1.

Speed limits on swimming of fishes and cetaceans.

Iosilevskii G, Weihs D.

J R Soc Interface. 2008 Mar 6;5(20):329-38.

2.

On the role of form and kinematics on the hydrodynamics of self-propelled body/caudal fin swimming.

Borazjani I, Sotiropoulos F.

J Exp Biol. 2010 Jan 1;213(1):89-107. doi: 10.1242/jeb.030932.

3.

The fish tail motion forms an attached leading edge vortex.

Borazjani I, Daghooghi M.

Proc Biol Sci. 2013 Feb 13;280(1756):20122071. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.2071. Print 2013 Apr 7.

4.

Hydrodynamics of a Flexible Soft-Rayed Caudal Fin.

Iosilevskii G.

PLoS One. 2016 Oct 3;11(10):e0163517. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0163517. eCollection 2016.

5.

Strouhal numbers and optimization of swimming by odontocete cetaceans.

Rohr JJ, Fish FE.

J Exp Biol. 2004 Apr;207(Pt 10):1633-42.

6.

Fish locomotion: recent advances and new directions.

Lauder GV.

Ann Rev Mar Sci. 2015;7:521-45. doi: 10.1146/annurev-marine-010814-015614. Epub 2014 Sep 19. Review.

PMID:
25251278
7.

Body fineness ratio as a predictor of maximum prolonged-swimming speed in coral reef fishes.

Walker JA, Alfaro ME, Noble MM, Fulton CJ.

PLoS One. 2013 Oct 18;8(10):e75422. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0075422. eCollection 2013.

8.
9.

Caudal differential pressure as a predictor of swimming speed of cod (Gadus morhua).

Webber DM, Boutilier RG, Kerr SR, Smale MJ.

J Exp Biol. 2001 Oct;204(Pt 20):3561-70.

10.

Passive mechanical models of fish caudal fins: effects of shape and stiffness on self-propulsion.

Feilich KL, Lauder GV.

Bioinspir Biomim. 2015 Apr 16;10(3):036002. doi: 10.1088/1748-3190/10/3/036002.

PMID:
25879846
11.

Speed-dependent intrinsic caudal fin muscle recruitment during steady swimming in bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus.

Flammang BE, Lauder GV.

J Exp Biol. 2008 Feb;211(Pt 4):587-98. doi: 10.1242/jeb.012096.

12.

Passive robotic models of propulsion by the bodies and caudal fins of fish.

Lauder GV, Flammang B, Alben S.

Integr Comp Biol. 2012 Nov;52(5):576-87. doi: 10.1093/icb/ics096. Epub 2012 Jun 26.

PMID:
22740513
13.

Stroke frequency, but not swimming speed, is related to body size in free-ranging seabirds, pinnipeds and cetaceans.

Sato K, Watanuki Y, Takahashi A, Miller PJ, Tanaka H, Kawabe R, Ponganis PJ, Handrich Y, Akamatsu T, Watanabe Y, Mitani Yo, Costa DP, Bost CA, Aoki K, Amano M, Trathan P, Shapiro A, Naito Y.

Proc Biol Sci. 2007 Feb 22;274(1609):471-7.

14.

Not So Fast: Swimming Behavior of Sailfish during Predator-Prey Interactions using High-Speed Video and Accelerometry.

Marras S, Noda T, Steffensen JF, Svendsen MB, Krause J, Wilson AD, Kurvers RH, Herbert-Read J, Boswell KM, Domenici P.

Integr Comp Biol. 2015 Oct;55(4):719-27. doi: 10.1093/icb/icv017. Epub 2015 Apr 21. Review.

PMID:
25898843
16.
17.

The effects of caudal fin loss and regeneration on the swimming performance of three cyprinid fish species with different swimming capacities.

Fu C, Cao ZD, Fu SJ.

J Exp Biol. 2013 Aug 15;216(Pt 16):3164-74. doi: 10.1242/jeb.084244. Epub 2013 May 9.

18.
19.

The fish tail as a derivation from axial musculoskeletal anatomy: an integrative analysis of functional morphology.

Flammang BE.

Zoology (Jena). 2014 Feb;117(1):86-92. doi: 10.1016/j.zool.2013.10.001. Epub 2013 Oct 29. Review.

PMID:
24290784
20.

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