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Items: 1 to 20 of 196

1.
2.
3.

Math = male, me = female, therefore math not = me.

Nosek BA, Banaji MR, Greenwald AG.

J Pers Soc Psychol. 2002 Jul;83(1):44-59.

PMID:
12088131
4.

Multiple social identities and stereotype threat: imbalance, accessibility, and working memory.

Rydell RJ, McConnell AR, Beilock SL.

J Pers Soc Psychol. 2009 May;96(5):949-66. doi: 10.1037/a0014846.

PMID:
19379029
5.

Why do women opt out? Sense of belonging and women's representation in mathematics.

Good C, Rattan A, Dweck CS.

J Pers Soc Psychol. 2012 Apr;102(4):700-17. doi: 10.1037/a0026659. Epub 2012 Jan 30.

PMID:
22288527
6.

Math-gender stereotypes in elementary school children.

Cvencek D, Meltzoff AN, Greenwald AG.

Child Dev. 2011 May-Jun;82(3):766-79. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01529.x. Epub 2011 Mar 9.

PMID:
21410915
7.

Reducing the gender achievement gap in college science: a classroom study of values affirmation.

Miyake A, Kost-Smith LE, Finkelstein ND, Pollock SJ, Cohen GL, Ito TA.

Science. 2010 Nov 26;330(6008):1234-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1195996.

8.

STEMing the tide: using ingroup experts to inoculate women's self-concept in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

Stout JG, Dasgupta N, Hunsinger M, McManus MA.

J Pers Soc Psychol. 2011 Feb;100(2):255-70. doi: 10.1037/a0021385.

PMID:
21142376
9.

The effect of gender stereotype activation on entrepreneurial intentions.

Gupta VK, Turban DB, Bhawe NM.

J Appl Psychol. 2008 Sep;93(5):1053-61. doi: 10.1037/0021-9010.93.5.1053.

PMID:
18808225
10.

Cross-national patterns of gender differences in mathematics: a meta-analysis.

Else-Quest NM, Hyde JS, Linn MC.

Psychol Bull. 2010 Jan;136(1):103-27. doi: 10.1037/a0018053. Erratum in: Psychol Bull. 2010 Mar;136(2):301.

PMID:
20063928
11.

Capitalizing on multiple social identities to prevent stereotype threat: the moderating role of self-esteem.

Rydell RJ, Boucher KL.

Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2010 Feb;36(2):239-50. doi: 10.1177/0146167209355062. Epub 2009 Dec 23.

PMID:
20032273
13.
14.

Exposure to scientific theories affects women's math performance.

Dar-Nimrod I, Heine SJ.

Science. 2006 Oct 20;314(5798):435.

15.

Relationships between Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) cognitive abilities and math achievement within a sample of college students with learning disabilities.

Proctor B.

J Learn Disabil. 2012 May-Jun;45(3):278-87. doi: 10.1177/0022219410392049. Epub 2011 May 12.

PMID:
21571701
16.

Girls' math performance under stereotype threat: the moderating role of mothers' gender stereotypes.

Tomasetto C, Alparone FR, Cadinu M.

Dev Psychol. 2011 Jul;47(4):943-9. doi: 10.1037/a0024047.

PMID:
21744956
17.

Knowing is half the battle: teaching stereotype threat as a means of improving women's math performance.

Johns M, Schmader T, Martens A.

Psychol Sci. 2005 Mar;16(3):175-9.

PMID:
15733195
18.

Interacting with sexist men triggers social identity threat among female engineers.

Logel C, Walton GM, Spencer SJ, Iserman EC, von Hippel W, Bell AE.

J Pers Soc Psychol. 2009 Jun;96(6):1089-103. doi: 10.1037/a0015703. Erratum in: J Pers Soc Psychol. 2009 Oct;97(4):578.

PMID:
19469589
19.

Stereotype threat and arousal: effects on women's math performance.

O'Brien LT, Crandall CS.

Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2003 Jun;29(6):782-9.

PMID:
15189633
20.

Cognitive consistency and math-gender stereotypes in Singaporean children.

Cvencek D, Meltzoff AN, Kapur M.

J Exp Child Psychol. 2014 Jan;117:73-91. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2013.07.018. Epub 2013 Oct 18.

PMID:
24141205

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