Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 158

1.

Cruciferous vegetables and human cancer risk: epidemiologic evidence and mechanistic basis.

Higdon JV, Delage B, Williams DE, Dashwood RH.

Pharmacol Res. 2007 Mar;55(3):224-36. Epub 2007 Jan 25. Review.

2.

Cruciferous vegetables: cancer protective mechanisms of glucosinolate hydrolysis products and selenium.

Keck AS, Finley JW.

Integr Cancer Ther. 2004 Mar;3(1):5-12. Review.

PMID:
15035868
3.

Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens.

Steinkellner H, Rabot S, Freywald C, Nobis E, Scharf G, Chabicovsky M, Knasmüller S, Kassie F.

Mutat Res. 2001 Sep 1;480-481:285-97. Review.

PMID:
11506821
4.

Cruciferous vegetables and colo-rectal cancer.

Lynn A, Collins A, Fuller Z, Hillman K, Ratcliffe B.

Proc Nutr Soc. 2006 Feb;65(1):135-44. Review.

PMID:
16441953
5.

Research on cruciferous vegetables, indole-3-carbinol, and cancer prevention: A tribute to Lee W. Wattenberg.

Fujioka N, Fritz V, Upadhyaya P, Kassie F, Hecht SS.

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2016 Jun;60(6):1228-38. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201500889. Epub 2016 May 23. Review.

PMID:
26840393
6.
7.

A review of the clinical efficacy and safety of cruciferous vegetable phytochemicals.

Minich DM, Bland JS.

Nutr Rev. 2007 Jun;65(6 Pt 1):259-67. Review.

PMID:
17605302
9.

Human metabolism and excretion of cancer chemoprotective glucosinolates and isothiocyanates of cruciferous vegetables.

Shapiro TA, Fahey JW, Wade KL, Stephenson KK, Talalay P.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1998 Dec;7(12):1091-100.

10.

Multiple therapeutic and preventive effects of 3,3'-diindolylmethane on cancers including prostate cancer and high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

Zhang WW, Feng Z, Narod SA.

J Biomed Res. 2014 Sep;28(5):339-48. doi: 10.7555/JBR.28.20140008. Epub 2014 Apr 20.

11.

Cruciferous vegetables, the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic polymorphism, and breast cancer risk.

Lee SA, Fowke JH, Lu W, Ye C, Zheng Y, Cai Q, Gu K, Gao YT, Shu XO, Zheng W.

Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;87(3):753-60.

12.

Urinary excretion of total isothiocyanates from cruciferous vegetables shows high dose-response relationship and may be a useful biomarker for isothiocyanate exposure.

Kristensen M, Krogholm KS, Frederiksen H, Bügel SH, Rasmussen SE.

Eur J Nutr. 2007 Oct;46(7):377-82. Epub 2007 Aug 23.

PMID:
17717627
13.
14.

Association between consumption of cruciferous vegetables and condiments and excretion in urine of isothiocyanate mercapturic acids.

Vermeulen M, van den Berg R, Freidig AP, van Bladeren PJ, Vaes WH.

J Agric Food Chem. 2006 Jul 26;54(15):5350-8.

PMID:
16848516
15.

Glucosinolates: bioavailability and importance to health.

Johnson IT.

Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2002 Jan;72(1):26-31. Review.

PMID:
11887749
16.

Consumption of cruciferous vegetables and glucosinolates in a Spanish adult population.

Agudo A, Ibáñez R, Amiano P, Ardanaz E, Barricarte A, Berenguer A, Dolores Chirlaque M, Dorronsoro M, Jakszyn P, Larrañaga N, Martinez C, Navarro C, Pera G, Quirós JR, Sanchéz MJ, Tormo MJ, González CA.

Eur J Clin Nutr. 2008 Mar;62(3):324-31. Epub 2007 Apr 4.

PMID:
17426741
18.

Phytochemicals from cruciferous plants protect against cancer by modulating carcinogen metabolism.

Talalay P, Fahey JW.

J Nutr. 2001 Nov;131(11 Suppl):3027S-33S. Review.

19.

Brassica vegetables and cancer prevention. Epidemiology and mechanisms.

van Poppel G, Verhoeven DT, Verhagen H, Goldbohm RA.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 1999;472:159-68. Review.

PMID:
10736624
20.

Cruciferous vegetable consumption and lung cancer risk: a systematic review.

Lam TK, Gallicchio L, Lindsley K, Shiels M, Hammond E, Tao XG, Chen L, Robinson KA, Caulfield LE, Herman JG, Guallar E, Alberg AJ.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Jan;18(1):184-95. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0710. Review.

Supplemental Content

Support Center