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Items: 1 to 20 of 177

1.

One size does not fit all.

Facio FM.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):40-2; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085407
2.

Clinical utility and full disclosure of genetic results to research participants.

Sharp RR, Foster MW.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):42-4; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085408
3.

Obligations in offering to disclose genetic research results.

Fernandez CV, Weijer C.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):44-6; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085409
4.

Considering the nature of individual research results.

Beskow LM.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):38-40; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085406
5.

Ethical considerations in the communication of unexpected information with clinical implications.

Lavieri RR, Garner SA.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):46-8; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085410
6.

Relationships with test-tubes: where's the reciprocity?

Fryer-Edwards K, Fullerton SM.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):36-8; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085405
7.

Questions, complexities, and limitations in disclosing individual genetic results.

Klitzman R.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):34-6; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085404
8.

Thresholds and boundaries in the disclosure of individual genetic research results.

Dressler LG, Juengst ET.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):18-20; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085396
9.

Tiered disclosure options promote the autonomy and well-being of research subjects.

Rothstein MA.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):20-1; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085397
10.

The dirty little truth: we want them to understand, but not really...

Morreim H.

Am J Bioeth. 2009 Feb;9(2):9-11. doi: 10.1080/15265160802662049. No abstract available.

PMID:
19180381
11.

Taking our obligations to research participants seriously: disclosing individual results of genetic research.

Manolio TA.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):32-4; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085403
12.

Disclosing genetic research results: examples from practice.

Ormond KE.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):30-2; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085402
13.

Best laid plans for offering results go awry.

Parker LS.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):22-3; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085398
14.

Letting the gene out of the bottle: a comment on returning individual research results to participants.

Ossorio PN.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):24-5; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085399
15.

When do genetic researchers have a duty to recontact study participants?

Wade CH, Kalfoglou AL.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):26-7; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085400
16.

The kindness of strangers: the donative contract between subjects and researchers and the non-obligation to return individual results of genetic research.

Meyer MN.

Am J Bioeth. 2008 Nov;8(11):44-6. doi: 10.1080/15265160802485045. No abstract available.

PMID:
19061109
17.

Undesirable implications of disclosing individual genetic results to research participants.

Meltzer LA.

Am J Bioeth. 2006 Nov-Dec;6(6):28-30; author reply W10-2. No abstract available.

PMID:
17085401
18.

To study, perchance to treat.

Trachtman H.

Am J Bioeth. 2009 Feb;9(2):11-2. doi: 10.1080/15265160802654228. No abstract available.

PMID:
19180382
19.

Randomization can be risky.

Lott J.

Am J Bioeth. 2009 Feb;9(2):17-8. doi: 10.1080/15265160802668954. No abstract available.

PMID:
19180386
20.

Understanding randomization: helpful strategies.

Brody H, Childress AM.

Am J Bioeth. 2009 Feb;9(2):14-5. doi: 10.1080/15265160802663245. No abstract available.

PMID:
19180384

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