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Items: 1 to 20 of 115

1.
2.

Short communication: Association of milk fatty acids with early lactation hyperketonemia and elevated concentration of nonesterified fatty acids.

Mann S, Nydam DV, Lock AL, Overton TR, McArt JAA.

J Dairy Sci. 2016 Jul;99(7):5851-5857. doi: 10.3168/jds.2016-10920. Epub 2016 May 11.

PMID:
27179869
4.

Prevalence of subclinical ketosis in dairy cattle in the Southwestern Iran and detection of cutoff point for NEFA and glucose concentrations for diagnosis of subclinical ketosis.

Asl AN, Nazifi S, Ghasrodashti AR, Olyaee A.

Prev Vet Med. 2011 Jun 1;100(1):38-43. doi: 10.1016/j.prevetmed.2011.02.013. Epub 2011 Mar 25.

PMID:
21439662
6.

Effects of elevated parameters of subclinical ketosis on the immune system of dairy cows: in vivo and in vitro results.

Schulz K, Frahm J, Kersten S, Meyer U, Reiche D, Sauerwein H, Dänicke S.

Arch Anim Nutr. 2015;69(2):113-27. doi: 10.1080/1745039X.2015.1013666. Epub 2015 Feb 24.

PMID:
25708603
7.

Ghrelin and its correlation with leptin, energy related metabolites and thyroidal hormones in dairy cows in transitional period.

Nowroozi-Asl A, Aarabi N, Rowshan-Ghasrodashti A.

Pol J Vet Sci. 2016;19(1):197-204. doi: 10.1515/pjvs-2016-0024.

PMID:
27096804
8.

Short communication: Effect of sampling time relative to the first daily feeding on interpretation of serum fatty acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in dairy cattle.

Quiroz-Rocha GF, LeBlanc SJ, Duffield TF, Jefferson B, Wood D, Leslie KE, Jacobs RM.

J Dairy Sci. 2010 May;93(5):2030-3. doi: 10.3168/jds.2009-2141.

PMID:
20412917
9.

Monitoring metabolic health of dairy cattle in the transition period.

LeBlanc S.

J Reprod Dev. 2010 Jan;56 Suppl:S29-35. Review.

PMID:
20629214
10.
12.

Evaluation of the change of serum copper and zinc concentrations of dairy cows with subclinical ketosis.

Zhang Z, Liu G, Li X, Gao L, Guo C, Wang H, Wang Z.

Biol Trace Elem Res. 2010 Dec;138(1-3):8-12. doi: 10.1007/s12011-009-8606-4. Epub 2010 Jan 26.

PMID:
20101474
13.
15.
16.

Metabolic predictors of post-partum disease and culling risk in dairy cattle.

Seifi HA, Leblanc SJ, Leslie KE, Duffield TF.

Vet J. 2011 May;188(2):216-20. doi: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2010.04.007. Epub 2010 May 8.

PMID:
20457532
17.

Effects of prepartal body condition score and peripartal energy supply of dairy cows on postpartal lipolysis, energy balance and ketogenesis: an animal model to investigate subclinical ketosis.

Schulz K, Frahm J, Meyer U, Kersten S, Reiche D, Rehage J, Dänicke S.

J Dairy Res. 2014 Aug;81(3):257-66. doi: 10.1017/S0022029914000107. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

PMID:
24594287
18.

Energy metabolites in pre- and postpartum dairy cattle as predictors of reproductive disorders.

Jackson RA, Wills JR, Kendall NR, Green MJ, Murray RD, Dobson H.

Vet Rec. 2011 May 28;168(21):562. doi: 10.1136/vr.d1565. Epub 2011 May 5.

PMID:
21546407
19.

Short communication: concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate in dairy cows are not well correlated during the transition period.

McCarthy MM, Mann S, Nydam DV, Overton TR, McArt JA.

J Dairy Sci. 2015 Sep;98(9):6284-90. doi: 10.3168/jds.2015-9446. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

PMID:
26188575
20.

Metabolic profiles in five high-producing Swedish dairy herds with a history of abomasal displacement and ketosis.

Stengärde L, Tråvén M, Emanuelson U, Holtenius K, Hultgren J, Niskanen R.

Acta Vet Scand. 2008 Aug 7;50:31. doi: 10.1186/1751-0147-50-31.

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