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Items: 1 to 20 of 256

1.

Spider fearful individuals attend to threat, then quickly avoid it: evidence from eye movements.

Rinck M, Becker ES.

J Abnorm Psychol. 2006 May;115(2):231-8.

PMID:
16737388
2.

Speeded detection and increased distraction in fear of spiders: evidence from eye movements.

Rinck M, Reinecke A, Ellwart T, Heuer K, Becker ES.

J Abnorm Psychol. 2005 May;114(2):235-48.

PMID:
15869354
3.

Attentional bias to moving spiders in spider fearful individuals.

Vrijsen JN, Fleurkens P, Nieuwboer W, Rinck M.

J Anxiety Disord. 2009 May;23(4):541-5. doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2008.11.002.

PMID:
19097852
4.

Time course of attentional bias for fear-relevant pictures in spider-fearful individuals.

Mogg K, Bradley BP.

Behav Res Ther. 2006 Sep;44(9):1241-50.

PMID:
16870133
5.

To look or not to look: an eye movement study of hypervigilance during change detection in high and low spider fearful students.

Huijding J, Mayer B, Koster EH, Muris P.

Emotion. 2011 Jun;11(3):666-74. doi: 10.1037/a0022996.

PMID:
21534662
6.

Toward and away from spiders: eye-movements in spider-fearful participants.

Gerdes AB, Pauli P, Alpers GW.

J Neural Transm (Vienna). 2009 Jun;116(6):725-33. doi: 10.1007/s00702-008-0167-8.

PMID:
19156350
7.

To look or not to look at threat? Scanpath differences within a group of spider phobics.

Pflugshaupt T, Mosimann UP, Schmitt WJ, von Wartburg R, Wurtz P, Lüthi M, Nyffeler T, Hess CW, Müri RM.

J Anxiety Disord. 2007;21(3):353-66.

PMID:
16814514
8.

Selective visual working memory in fear of spiders: the role of automaticity and material-specificity.

Reinecke A, Becker ES, Rinck M.

J Anxiety Disord. 2009 Dec;23(8):1053-63. doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2009.07.007.

PMID:
19643570
9.

Fear-relevant change detection in spider-fearful and non-fearful participants.

Mayer B, Muris P, Vogel L, Nojoredjo I, Merckelbach H.

J Anxiety Disord. 2006;20(4):510-9.

PMID:
15955657
10.

When spiders appear suddenly: spider-phobic patients are distracted by task-irrelevant spiders.

Gerdes AB, Alpers GW, Pauli P.

Behav Res Ther. 2008 Feb;46(2):174-87.

PMID:
18154873
11.

Hypervigilance-avoidance pattern in spider phobia.

Pflugshaupt T, Mosimann UP, von Wartburg R, Schmitt W, Nyffeler T, Müri RM.

J Anxiety Disord. 2005;19(1):105-16.

PMID:
15488370
13.

Approach and avoidance in fear of spiders.

Rinck M, Becker ES.

J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2007 Jun;38(2):105-20.

PMID:
17126289
14.

Activation and measurement of threat associations in fear of spiders: an application of the Extrinsic Affective Simon Task.

Ellwart T, Becker ES, Rinck M.

J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;36(4):281-99.

PMID:
16153389
15.
16.

Attention training for reducing spider fear in spider-fearful individuals.

Reese HE, McNally RJ, Najmi S, Amir N.

J Anxiety Disord. 2010 Oct;24(7):657-62. doi: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2010.04.006.

17.

The use of stimulus dimensions in judgement making in spider fearful and nonfearful individuals.

Cavanagh K, Davey GC.

Behav Res Ther. 2001 Oct;39(10):1199-211.

PMID:
11579989
18.
19.

Phobic spider fear is associated with enhanced attentional capture by spider pictures: a rapid serial presentation event-related potential study.

Van Strien JW, Franken IH, Huijding J.

Neuroreport. 2009 Mar 4;20(4):445-9. doi: 10.1097/WNR.0b013e3283262e26.

PMID:
19218869
20.

The relationship between cognitive avoidance and attentional bias for snake-related thoughts.

Fawzy TI, Hecker JE, Clark J.

J Anxiety Disord. 2006;20(8):1103-17.

PMID:
16522364
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