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Items: 1 to 20 of 188

1.

Roles of endogenous ascorbate and glutathione in the cellular reduction and cytotoxicity of sulfamethoxazole-nitroso.

Lavergne SN, Kurian JR, Bajad SU, Maki JE, Yoder AR, Guzinski MV, Graziano FM, Trepanier LA.

Toxicology. 2006 May 1;222(1-2):25-36. Epub 2006 Feb 13.

PMID:
16473451
2.

Plasma ascorbate deficiency is associated with impaired reduction of sulfamethoxazole-nitroso in HIV infection.

Trepanier LA, Yoder AR, Bajad S, Beckwith MD, Bellehumeur JL, Graziano FM.

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2004 Aug 15;36(5):1041-50.

PMID:
15247557
3.

In vitro cytotoxicity as a marker of hypersensitivity to sulphamethoxazole in patients with HIV.

Carr A, Tindall B, Penny R, Cooper DA.

Clin Exp Immunol. 1993 Oct;94(1):21-5.

4.

Reactions of the nitroso and hydroxylamine metabolites of sulfamethoxazole with reduced glutathione. Implications for idiosyncratic toxicity.

Cribb AE, Miller M, Leeder JS, Hill J, Spielberg SP.

Drug Metab Dispos. 1991 Sep-Oct;19(5):900-6.

PMID:
1686233
5.

Evaluation of the clinical, immunologic, and biochemical effects of nitroso sulfamethoxazole administration to dogs: a pilot study.

Lavergne SN, Volkman EM, Maki JE, Yoder AR, Trepanier LA.

Toxicology. 2005 Mar 1;208(1):63-72.

PMID:
15664433
6.

Combined ascorbate and glutathione deficiency leads to decreased cytochrome b5 expression and impaired reduction of sulfamethoxazole hydroxylamine.

Bhusari S, Abouraya M, Padilla ML, Pinkerton ME, Drescher NJ, Sacco JC, Trepanier LA.

Arch Toxicol. 2010 Aug;84(8):597-607. doi: 10.1007/s00204-010-0530-z. Epub 2010 Mar 11.

7.

In vitro formation, disposition and toxicity of N-acetoxy-sulfamethoxazole, a potential mediator of sulfamethoxazole toxicity.

Nakamura H, Uetrecht J, Cribb AE, Miller MA, Zahid N, Hill J, Josephy PD, Grant DM, Spielberg SP.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1995 Sep;274(3):1099-104.

PMID:
7562475
8.

Is hydroxylamine-induced cytotoxicity a valid marker for hypersensitivity reactions to sulfamethoxazole in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals?

Reilly TP, MacArthur RD, Farrough MJ, Crane LR, Woster PM, Svensson CK.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 1999 Dec;291(3):1356-64.

10.

Covalent binding of sulfamethoxazole reactive metabolites to human and rat liver subcellular fractions assessed by immunochemical detection.

Cribb AE, Nuss CE, Alberts DW, Lamphere DB, Grant DM, Grossman SJ, Spielberg SP.

Chem Res Toxicol. 1996 Mar;9(2):500-7.

PMID:
8839055
11.
12.

Cytotoxicity of sulfonamide reactive metabolites: apoptosis and selective toxicity of CD8(+) cells by the hydroxylamine of sulfamethoxazole.

Hess DA, Sisson ME, Suria H, Wijsman J, Puvanesasingham R, Madrenas J, Rieder MJ.

FASEB J. 1999 Oct;13(13):1688-98.

PMID:
10506572
13.

Characterization of sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethoxazole metabolite-specific T-cell responses in animals and humans.

Farrell J, Naisbitt DJ, Drummond NS, Depta JP, Vilar FJ, Pirmohamed M, Park BK.

J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2003 Jul;306(1):229-37. Epub 2003 Apr 3.

14.
15.

Cellular disposition of sulphamethoxazole and its metabolites: implications for hypersensitivity.

Naisbitt DJ, Hough SJ, Gill HJ, Pirmohamed M, Kitteringham NR, Park BK.

Br J Pharmacol. 1999 Mar;126(6):1393-407.

16.

Influence of reduced glutathione on the proliferative response of sulfamethoxazole-specific and sulfamethoxazole-metabolite-specific human CD4+ T-cells.

Burkhart C, von Greyerz S, Depta JP, Naisbitt DJ, Britschgi M, Park KB, Pichler WJ.

Br J Pharmacol. 2001 Feb;132(3):623-30.

18.

Ascorbic acid decreases oxidant stress in endothelial cells caused by the nitroxide tempol.

May JM, Qu ZC, Juliao S, Cobb CE.

Free Radic Res. 2005 Feb;39(2):195-202.

PMID:
15763967
20.

An in vitro investigation of predisposition to sulphonamide idiosyncratic toxicity in dogs.

Cribb AE, Spielberg SP.

Vet Res Commun. 1990;14(3):241-52.

PMID:
2382408

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