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Items: 1 to 20 of 130

1.

Tobacco smoke induces a persistent, but recoverable state in Chlamydia pneumoniae infection of human endothelial cells.

Wiedeman JA, Kaul R, Heuer LS, Thao NN, Pinkerton KE, Wenman WM.

Microb Pathog. 2005 Nov-Dec;39(5-6):197-204. Epub 2005 Nov 4.

PMID:
16271847
2.

Tobacco smoke induces persistent infection of Chlamydophila pneumoniae in HEp-2 cells.

Wiedeman JA, Kaul R, Heuer LS, Thao NN, Pinkerton KE, Wenman WM.

Microb Pathog. 2004 Sep;37(3):141-8.

PMID:
15351037
3.

In vitro infection and pathogenesis of Chlamydia pneumoniae in endovascular cells.

Quinn TC, Gaydos CA.

Am Heart J. 1999 Nov;138(5 Pt 2):S507-11.

PMID:
10539860
4.

Atherogenetically relevant cells support continuous growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

Maass M, Gieffers J, Solbach W.

Herz. 2000 Mar;25(2):68-72.

PMID:
10829241
5.

Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in circulating human monocytes is refractory to antibiotic treatment.

Gieffers J, Füllgraf H, Jahn J, Klinger M, Dalhoff K, Katus HA, Solbach W, Maass M.

Circulation. 2001 Jan 23;103(3):351-6.

7.

Chlamydia pneumoniae growth inhibition in human monocytic THP-1 cells and human epithelial HEp-2 cells by a novel phenoxazine derivative.

Uruma T, Yamaguchi H, Fukuda M, Kawakami H, Goto H, Kishimoto T, Yamamoto Y, Tomoda A, Kamiya S.

J Med Microbiol. 2005 Dec;54(Pt 12):1143-9.

PMID:
16278427
8.

Replication of Chlamydia pneumoniae in vitro in human macrophages, endothelial cells, and aortic artery smooth muscle cells.

Gaydos CA, Summersgill JT, Sahney NN, Ramirez JA, Quinn TC.

Infect Immun. 1996 May;64(5):1614-20.

9.

Apolipoprotein E4 enhances attachment of Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae elementary bodies to host cells.

Gérard HC, Fomicheva E, Whittum-Hudson JA, Hudson AP.

Microb Pathog. 2008 Apr;44(4):279-85. Epub 2007 Oct 18.

PMID:
17997273
10.

Serotonin and melatonin, neurohormones for homeostasis, as novel inhibitors of infections by the intracellular parasite chlamydia.

Rahman MA, Azuma Y, Fukunaga H, Murakami T, Sugi K, Fukushi H, Miura K, Suzuki H, Shirai M.

J Antimicrob Chemother. 2005 Nov;56(5):861-8. Epub 2005 Sep 19.

PMID:
16172105
11.
12.

Chlamydia pneumoniae multiplies in human endothelial cells in vitro.

Kaukoranta-Tolvanen SS, Laitinen K, Saikku P, Leinonen M.

Microb Pathog. 1994 Apr;16(4):313-9.

PMID:
7968460
13.

Chlamydophila pneumoniae derived from inclusions late in the infectious cycle induce aponecrosis in human aortic endothelial cells.

Marino J, Stoeckli I, Walch M, Latinovic-Golic S, Sundstroem H, Groscurth P, Ziegler U, Dumrese C.

BMC Microbiol. 2008 Feb 19;8:32. doi: 10.1186/1471-2180-8-32.

14.

Chlamydia pneumoniae expresses genes required for DNA replication but not cytokinesis during persistent infection of HEp-2 cells.

Byrne GI, Ouellette SP, Wang Z, Rao JP, Lu L, Beatty WL, Hudson AP.

Infect Immun. 2001 Sep;69(9):5423-9.

15.

Inhibition of apoptosis in neuronal cells infected with Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae.

Appelt DM, Roupas MR, Way DS, Bell MG, Albert EV, Hammond CJ, Balin BJ.

BMC Neurosci. 2008 Jan 24;9:13. doi: 10.1186/1471-2202-9-13.

16.

Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection of human aortic endothelial cells induces the expression of FC gamma receptor II (FcgammaRII).

Vielma S, Virella G, Gorod A, Lopes-Virella M.

Clin Immunol. 2002 Sep;104(3):265-73.

PMID:
12217337
17.

Chlamydia pneumoniae alters mildly oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced cell death in human endothelial cells, leading to necrosis rather than apoptosis.

Nazzal D, Cantero AV, Therville N, Segui B, Negre-Salvayre A, Thomsen M, Benoist H.

J Infect Dis. 2006 Jan 1;193(1):136-45. Epub 2005 Nov 29.

PMID:
16323142
18.

Infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii by Chlamydia pneumoniae.

Essig A, Heinemann M, Simnacher U, Marre R.

Appl Environ Microbiol. 1997 Apr;63(4):1396-9.

19.

Microarray analysis of a Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected human epithelial cell line by use of gene ontology hierarchy.

Alvesalo J, Greco D, Leinonen M, Raitila T, Vuorela P, Auvinen P.

J Infect Dis. 2008 Jan 1;197(1):156-62. doi: 10.1086/524142.

PMID:
18171299
20.

Chlamydia pneumoniae stimulates the proliferation of HUVEC through the induction of VEGF by THP-1.

Carratelli CR, Paolillo R, Rizzo A.

Int Immunopharmacol. 2007 Mar;7(3):287-94. Epub 2006 Nov 27.

PMID:
17276886

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