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Items: 1 to 20 of 197

1.

A retrospective analysis of a remifentanil/propofol general anesthetic for craniotomy before awake functional brain mapping.

Keifer JC, Dentchev D, Little K, Warner DS, Friedman AH, Borel CO.

Anesth Analg. 2005 Aug;101(2):502-8, table of contents.

PMID:
16037168
2.

Comparison of the time to extubation after use of remifentanil or sufentanil in combination with propofol as anesthesia in adults undergoing nonemergency intracranial surgery: a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial.

Djian MC, Blanchet B, Pesce F, Sermet A, Disdet M, Vazquez V, Gury C, Roux FX, Raggueneau JL, Coste J, Joly LM.

Clin Ther. 2006 Apr;28(4):560-8.

PMID:
16750467
3.

[Efficacy of remifentanil for anesthetic management of awake craniotomy].

Okada M, Takata K, Kawamae K.

Masui. 2010 Jan;59(1):75-81. Japanese.

PMID:
20077774
4.

The asleep-awake technique using propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia for awake craniotomy for cerebral tumours.

Olsen KS.

Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2008 Aug;25(8):662-9. doi: 10.1017/S0265021508003633. Epub 2008 Feb 21.

PMID:
18289443
5.

Monitored anesthesia care using remifentanil and propofol for awake craniotomy.

Berkenstadt H, Perel A, Hadani M, Unofrievich I, Ram Z.

J Neurosurg Anesthesiol. 2001 Jul;13(3):246-9.

PMID:
11426102
7.

Dosing of remifentanil to prevent movement during craniotomy in the absence of neuromuscular blockade.

Maurtua MA, Deogaonkar A, Bakri MH, Mascha E, Na J, Foss J, Sessler DI, Lotto M, Ebrahim Z, Schubert A.

J Neurosurg Anesthesiol. 2008 Oct;20(4):221-5. doi: 10.1097/ANA.0b013e3181806c4a.

PMID:
18812884
8.

The asleep-awake-asleep anesthetic technique for intraoperative language mapping.

Huncke K, Van de Wiele B, Fried I, Rubinstein EH.

Neurosurgery. 1998 Jun;42(6):1312-6; discussion 1316-7.

PMID:
9632190
9.

[Remifentanil for awake craniotomy].

Aoki M, Kurihara R, Goto T.

Masui. 2008 Dec;57(12):1510-2. Japanese.

PMID:
19108495
10.

Anesthetic complications of awake craniotomies for epilepsy surgery.

Skucas AP, Artru AA.

Anesth Analg. 2006 Mar;102(3):882-7.

PMID:
16492845
11.

The use of a remifentanil infusion for hemodynamic control during intracranial surgery.

Gesztesi Z, Mootz BL, White PF.

Anesth Analg. 1999 Nov;89(5):1282-7.

PMID:
10553851
12.
13.

Remifentanil and propofol combination for awake craniotomy: case report with pharmacokinetic simulations.

Johnson KB, Egan TD.

J Neurosurg Anesthesiol. 1998 Jan;10(1):25-9. Erratum in: J Neurosurg Anesthesiol 1998 Apr;10(2):69.

PMID:
9438615
14.
15.

Dexmedetomidine sedation during awake craniotomy for seizure resection: effects on electrocorticography.

Souter MJ, Rozet I, Ojemann JG, Souter KJ, Holmes MD, Lee L, Lam AM.

J Neurosurg Anesthesiol. 2007 Jan;19(1):38-44.

PMID:
17198099
16.

Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy is safe and well-tolerated.

Andersen JH, Olsen KS.

Dan Med Bull. 2010 Oct;57(10):A4194.

PMID:
21040682
17.

No difference in emergence time and early cognitive function between sevoflurane-fentanyl and propofol-remifentanil in patients undergoing craniotomy for supratentorial intracranial surgery.

Magni G, Baisi F, La Rosa I, Imperiale C, Fabbrini V, Pennacchiotti ML, Rosa G.

J Neurosurg Anesthesiol. 2005 Jul;17(3):134-8.

PMID:
16037733
18.

Use of dexmedetomidine in awake craniotomy in adolescents: report of two cases.

Everett LL, van Rooyen IF, Warner MH, Shurtleff HA, Saneto RP, Ojemann JG.

Paediatr Anaesth. 2006 Mar;16(3):338-42.

PMID:
16490103
19.

Multimodal protocol for awake craniotomy in language cortex tumour surgery.

Picht T, Kombos T, Gramm HJ, Brock M, Suess O.

Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2006 Feb;148(2):127-37; discussion 137-8. Epub 2005 Dec 30.

PMID:
16374563
20.

The laryngeal mask airway for awake craniotomy in the pediatric patient: report of three cases.

Hagberg CA, Gollas A, Berry JM.

J Clin Anesth. 2004 Feb;16(1):43-7.

PMID:
14984859

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