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Items: 1 to 20 of 81

1.

Can animal models help us select specific compounds for cancer prevention trials?

Hawk ET, Umar A, Lubet RA, Kopelovich L, Viner JL.

Recent Results Cancer Res. 2005;166:71-87. Review.

PMID:
15648184
2.

Safety and nutritional assessment of GM plants and derived food and feed: the role of animal feeding trials.

EFSA GMO Panel Working Group on Animal Feeding Trials.

Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 Mar;46 Suppl 1:S2-70. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2008.02.008. Epub 2008 Feb 13. Review.

PMID:
18328408
3.
4.

Preclinical in vitro models from genetically engineered mice for breast and colon cancer (Review).

Telang N, Katdare M.

Oncol Rep. 2011 May;25(5):1195-201. doi: 10.3892/or.2011.1215. Epub 2011 Mar 10. Review.

PMID:
21399881
5.

Animal models of disease: pre-clinical animal models of cancer and their applications and utility in drug discovery.

Ruggeri BA, Camp F, Miknyoczki S.

Biochem Pharmacol. 2014 Jan 1;87(1):150-61. doi: 10.1016/j.bcp.2013.06.020. Epub 2013 Jun 28. Review.

PMID:
23817077
6.

The mighty mouse: genetically engineered mouse models in cancer drug development.

Sharpless NE, Depinho RA.

Nat Rev Drug Discov. 2006 Sep;5(9):741-54. Epub 2006 Aug 18. Review.

PMID:
16915232
7.

Cancer chemoprevention agent development strategies for genistein.

Steele VE, Pereira MA, Sigman CC, Kelloff GJ.

J Nutr. 1995 Mar;125(3 Suppl):713S-716S.

PMID:
7884556
8.

Erlotinib: CP 358774, NSC 718781, OSI 774, R 1415.

Adis International Ltd.

Drugs R D. 2003;4(4):243-8.

PMID:
12848590
9.

Inhibition of tumorigenesis in animals.

Wattenberg LW.

IARC Sci Publ. 1996;(139):151-8. Review.

PMID:
8923027
10.

Spontaneous and genetically engineered animal models; use in preclinical cancer drug development.

Hansen K, Khanna C.

Eur J Cancer. 2004 Apr;40(6):858-80. Review.

PMID:
15120042
11.

Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

Osborne MP.

Surg Clin North Am. 1999 Oct;79(5):1207-21. Review.

PMID:
10572559
12.

Chemoprevention: general perspective.

Shureiqi I, Reddy P, Brenner DE.

Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2000 Mar;33(3):157-67. Review.

PMID:
10789490
13.

Precancer in mice: animal models used to understand, prevent, and treat human precancers.

Cardiff RD, Anver MR, Boivin GP, Bosenberg MW, Maronpot RR, Molinolo AA, Nikitin AY, Rehg JE, Thomas GV, Russell RG, Ward JM.

Toxicol Pathol. 2006;34(6):699-707.

PMID:
17074738
14.

Anticancer Drug Development: The Way Forward.

Connors T.

Oncologist. 1996;1(3):180-181.

15.

Recent advances in cancer chemoprevention.

Lippman SM, Hittelman WN, Lotan R, Pastorino U, Hong WK.

Cancer Cells. 1991 Feb;3(2):59-65.

PMID:
1674206
16.

The promise of genetically engineered mice for cancer prevention studies.

Green JE, Hudson T.

Nat Rev Cancer. 2005 Mar;5(3):184-98. Review.

PMID:
15738982
17.

Development of breast cancer chemopreventive drugs.

Kelloff GJ, Boone CW, Steele VE, Crowell JA, Lubet R, Doody LA, Greenwald P.

J Cell Biochem Suppl. 1993;17G:2-13. Review.

PMID:
8007699
18.
19.

Multigenerational reproductive study of genistein (Cas No. 446-72-0) in Sprague-Dawley rats (feed study).

National Toxicology Program.

Natl Toxicol Program Tech Rep Ser. 2008 Mar;(539):1-266.

20.

Protection against cancer by dietary IP6 and inositol.

Vucenik I, Shamsuddin AM.

Nutr Cancer. 2006;55(2):109-25. Review.

PMID:
17044765

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