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Items: 1 to 20 of 130

1.

Vaccine cell substrates 2004.

Sheets R, Petricciani J.

Expert Rev Vaccines. 2004 Dec;3(6):633-8. No abstract available.

PMID:
15606346
2.
3.

Observations on the use of BHK 21 Clone 13 cells for foot-and-mouth disease vaccine production.

Capstick PB, Garland AJ.

Bull Off Int Epizoot. 1965 May;64:215-23. No abstract available.

PMID:
5868390
4.

[Basic requirements of viral vaccines and methods for their control].

Osidse DF.

Arch Exp Veterinarmed. 1980;34(1):123-6. German.

PMID:
6774690
5.

[Use of diploid cell lines as a multiplication substrate for viral vaccine production].

Welke G.

Z Gesamte Hyg. 1980;26(5):365-72. German. No abstract available.

PMID:
7008390
6.

Nonhuman primate diploid cells for vaccine production.

Petricciani JC.

Dev Biol Stand. 1976 Dec 13-15;37:21-5.

PMID:
1036399
7.

Production of viral vaccines in stirred bioreactors.

Shevitz J, LaPorte TL, Stinnett TE.

Adv Biotechnol Processes. 1990;14:1-35. Review. No abstract available.

PMID:
2121161
8.

Issues of biological assays for viral vaccines.

Lee CK.

Dev Biol Stand. 1996;88:41-7. Review.

PMID:
9119161
9.

The choice of the cell substrate for human virus vaccine production.

Hayflick L.

Lab Pract. 1970 Jan;19(1):58-62. No abstract available.

PMID:
4984599
10.

Suspension-Vero cell cultures as a platform for viral vaccine production.

Paillet C, Forno G, Kratje R, Etcheverrigaray M.

Vaccine. 2009 Oct 30;27(46):6464-7. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2009.06.020. Epub 2009 Jun 24.

PMID:
19559123
11.

Designing cell lines for viral vaccine production: Where do we stand?

Genzel Y.

Biotechnol J. 2015 May;10(5):728-40. doi: 10.1002/biot.201400388. Epub 2015 Apr 22. Review.

PMID:
25903999
12.

History of the acceptance of human diploid cell strains as substrates for human virus vaccine manufacture.

Hayflick L, Plotkin S, Stevenson RE.

Dev Biol Stand. 1987;68:9-17. No abstract available.

PMID:
3691964
13.

Immunization of experimental animals with vaccines produced in known oncogenic cell lines.

Hull RN.

Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1968 Dec;29:503-9. No abstract available.

PMID:
5720804
14.

[Evaluation of transplantable cell lines as a substrate for producing biologically active substances].

Grachev VP, Petrichchiani DS.

Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):46-51. Review. Russian. No abstract available.

PMID:
3107285
15.

[Cell-containing substrates and vaccine production].

Majer M.

Schweiz Med Wochenschr. 1970 Nov 28;100(48):2086-9. German. No abstract available.

PMID:
5003834
16.

MaTu--a contaminant or an anti-cancer vaccine?

Závada J.

Folia Biol (Praha). 1993;39(4):167-77. No abstract available. Erratum in: Folia Biol (Praha) 1993;39(6):following 322.

PMID:
8187895
17.
18.

Cell substrates for human virus vaccine preparation--general comments.

Hayflick L.

Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1968 Dec;29:83-91. No abstract available.

PMID:
5720814
19.

Production of human virus vaccines in primary mammalian cells.

Stones PB.

Lab Pract. 1970 Jan;19(1):40-1 passim. No abstract available.

PMID:
4984598
20.

Matrix and backstage: cellular substrates for viral vaccines.

Jordan I, Sandig V.

Viruses. 2014 Apr 11;6(4):1672-700. doi: 10.3390/v6041672. Review.

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