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Items: 1 to 20 of 220

1.

The adaptive significance of inquiline parasite workers.

Sumner S, Nash DR, Boomsma JJ.

Proc Biol Sci. 2003 Jun 22;270(1521):1315-22.

2.

First evidence for slave rebellion: enslaved ant workers systematically kill the brood of their social parasite protomognathus americanus.

Achenbach A, Foitzik S.

Evolution. 2009 Apr;63(4):1068-75. doi: 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00591.x. Epub 2009 Feb 23.

PMID:
19243573
3.

Blending in with the crowd: social parasites integrate into their host colonies using a flexible chemical signature.

D'Ettorre P, Mondy N, Lenoir A, Errard C.

Proc Biol Sci. 2002 Sep 22;269(1503):1911-8.

4.

The coevolutionary dynamics of obligate ant social parasite systems--between prudence and antagonism.

Brandt M, Foitzik S, Fischer-Blass B, Heinze J.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc. 2005 May;80(2):251-67. Review.

PMID:
15921051
5.

The evolution of worker caste diversity in social insects.

Fjerdingstad EJ, Crozier RH.

Am Nat. 2006 Mar;167(3):390-400. Epub 2006 Jan 30.

PMID:
16673347
6.

Ant parasite queens revert to mating singly.

Sumner S, Hughes WO, Pedersen JS, Boomsma JJ.

Nature. 2004 Mar 4;428(6978):35-6.

PMID:
14999273
7.

Deleterious Wolbachia in the ant Formica truncorum.

Wenseleers T, Sundström L, Billen J.

Proc Biol Sci. 2002 Mar 22;269(1491):623-9.

8.

Chemical disguise as particular caste of host ants in the ant inquiline parasite Niphanda fusca (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae).

Hojo MK, Wada-Katsumata A, Akino T, Yamaguchi S, Ozaki M, Yamaoka R.

Proc Biol Sci. 2009 Feb 7;276(1656):551-8. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2008.1064.

9.

Knowing your enemies: seasonal dynamics of host-social parasite recognition.

D'Ettorre P, Brunner E, Wenseleers T, Heinze J.

Naturwissenschaften. 2004 Dec;91(12):594-7. Epub 2004 Oct 2.

PMID:
15570412
10.

Acoustical mimicry in a predatory social parasite of ants.

Barbero F, Bonelli S, Thomas JA, Balletto E, Schönrogge K.

J Exp Biol. 2009 Dec;212(Pt 24):4084-90. doi: 10.1242/jeb.032912.

11.

Social parasitism by male-producing reproductive workers in a eusocial insect.

Lopez-Vaamonde C, Koning JW, Brown RM, Jordan WC, Bourke AF.

Nature. 2004 Jul 29;430(6999):557-60.

PMID:
15282605
12.
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14.

Coevolution in host-parasite systems: behavioural strategies of slave-making ants and their hosts.

Foitzik S, DeHeer CJ, Hunjan DN, Herbers JM.

Proc Biol Sci. 2001 Jun 7;268(1472):1139-46.

15.

Geographic variation of caste structure among ant populations.

Yang AS, Martin CH, Nijhout HF.

Curr Biol. 2004 Mar 23;14(6):514-9.

16.

Sympatric speciation through intraspecific social parasitism.

Savolainen R, Vepsalainen K.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2003 Jun 10;100(12):7169-74. Epub 2003 May 9.

17.

Reproductive conflict in social insects: male production by workers in a slave-making ant.

Brunner E, Trindl A, Falk KH, Heinze J, D'Ettorre P.

Evolution. 2005 Nov;59(11):2480-2.

PMID:
16396188
18.

A unique strategy of host colony exploitation in a parasitic ant: workers of Polyrhachis lama rear their brood in neighbouring host nests.

Maschwitz U, Go C, Kaufmann E, Buschinger A.

Naturwissenschaften. 2004 Jan;91(1):40-3. Epub 2003 Nov 27.

PMID:
14740103
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20.

Reproduction, dominance, and caste: endocrine profiles of queens and workers of the ant Harpegnathos saltator.

Penick CA, Liebig J, Brent CS.

J Comp Physiol A Neuroethol Sens Neural Behav Physiol. 2011 Nov;197(11):1063-71. doi: 10.1007/s00359-011-0667-0. Epub 2011 Jul 20.

PMID:
21773739
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