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Items: 1 to 20 of 255

1.

Sodium bicarbonate ingestion does not alter the slow component of oxygen uptake kinetics in professional cyclists.

Santalla A, Pérez M, Montilla M, Vicente L, Davison R, Earnest C, Lucía A.

J Sports Sci. 2003 Jan;21(1):39-47.

PMID:
12587890
2.

Metabolic alkalosis induced by pre-exercise ingestion of NaHCO3 does not modulate the slow component of VO2 kinetics in humans.

Zoładź JA, Duda K, Majerczak J, Domański J, Emmerich J.

J Physiol Pharmacol. 1997 Jun;48(2):211-23.

PMID:
9223026
3.

Sodium bicarbonate ingestion alters the slow but not the fast phase of VO2 kinetics.

Berger NJ, McNaughton LR, Keatley S, Wilkerson DP, Jones AM.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Nov;38(11):1909-17.

PMID:
17095923
4.

Sodium bicarbonate ingestion does not attenuate the VO2 slow component during constant-load exercise.

Heck KL, Potteiger JA, Nau KL, Schroeder JM.

Int J Sport Nutr. 1998 Mar;8(1):60-9.

PMID:
9534082
5.

Effect of sodium bicarbonate on muscle metabolism during intense endurance cycling.

Stephens TJ, McKenna MJ, Canny BJ, Snow RJ, McConell GK.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Apr;34(4):614-21.

PMID:
11932569
6.

The slow component of VO2 in professional cyclists.

Lucía A, Hoyos J, Chicharro JL.

Br J Sports Med. 2000 Oct;34(5):367-74.

7.

Effects of induced metabolic alkalosis on prolonged intermittent-sprint performance.

Bishop D, Claudius B.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 May;37(5):759-67.

PMID:
15870629
8.

The effects of combined glucose-electrolyte and sodium bicarbonate ingestion on prolonged intermittent exercise performance.

Price MJ, Cripps D.

J Sports Sci. 2012;30(10):975-83. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2012.685086. Epub 2012 May 22.

PMID:
22616569
9.

Sodium bicarbonate ingestion does not improve performance in women cyclists.

Kozak-Collins K, Burke ER, Schoene RB.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1994 Dec;26(12):1510-5.

PMID:
7869886
10.

Pre-exercise alkalosis and acid-base recovery.

Siegler JC, Keatley S, Midgley AW, Nevill AM, McNaughton LR.

Int J Sports Med. 2008 Jul;29(7):545-51. Epub 2007 Nov 14.

PMID:
18004683
11.

Metabolic demands of intense aerobic interval training in competitive cyclists.

Stepto NK, Martin DT, Fallon KE, Hawley JA.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Feb;33(2):303-10.

PMID:
11224822
12.
13.

Induced metabolic alkalosis affects muscle metabolism and repeated-sprint ability.

Bishop D, Edge J, Davis C, Goodman C.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 May;36(5):807-13.

PMID:
15126714
14.

Effects of sodium bicarbonate on VO2 kinetics during heavy exercise.

Kolkhorst FW, Rezende RS, Levy SS, Buono MJ.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2004 Nov;36(11):1895-9.

PMID:
15514504
15.

Dose-related effects of prolonged NaHCO3 ingestion during high-intensity exercise.

Douroudos II, Fatouros IG, Gourgoulis V, Jamurtas AZ, Tsitsios T, Hatzinikolaou A, Margonis K, Mavromatidis K, Taxildaris K.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Oct;38(10):1746-53.

PMID:
17019296
16.

Effect of prior exercise on the VO2/work rate relationship during incremental exercise and constant work rate exercise.

Marles A, Mucci P, Legrand R, Betbeder D, Prieur F.

Int J Sports Med. 2006 May;27(5):345-50.

PMID:
16729372
17.

Influence of pre-exercise acidosis and alkalosis on the kinetics of acid-base recovery following intense exercise.

Robergs R, Hutchinson K, Hendee S, Madden S, Siegler J.

Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2005 Feb;15(1):59-74.

PMID:
15902990
18.

Effects of prior exercise and recovery duration on oxygen uptake kinetics during heavy exercise in humans.

Burnley M, Doust JH, Carter H, Jones AM.

Exp Physiol. 2001 May;86(3):417-25.

PMID:
11429659
19.

The effects of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) ingestion on high intensity cycling capacity.

Higgins MF, James RS, Price MJ.

J Sports Sci. 2013;31(9):972-81. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2012.758868. Epub 2013 Jan 16.

PMID:
23323673
20.

Effect of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on exhaustive resistance exercise performance.

Webster MJ, Webster MN, Crawford RE, Gladden LB.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1993 Aug;25(8):960-5.

PMID:
8396707

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