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Items: 1 to 20 of 116

2.

Relationships Among Positive Emotions, Coping, Resilience and Mental Health.

Gloria CT, Steinhardt MA.

Stress Health. 2016 Apr;32(2):145-56. doi: 10.1002/smi.2589. Epub 2014 Jun 24.

PMID:
24962138
3.

Terrorism and resilience: adolescents' and teachers' responses to September 11, 2001.

Noppe IC, Noppe LD, Bartell D.

Death Stud. 2006 Jan-Feb;30(1):41-60.

PMID:
16296560
4.
5.

Coping with terrorism: the impact of increased salience of terrorism on mood and self-efficacy of intrinsically religious and nonreligious people.

Fischer P, Greitemeyer T, Kastenm├╝ller A, Jonas E, Frey D.

Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2006 Mar;32(3):365-77.

PMID:
16455863
6.
7.

Psychological resilience: the impact of affectivity and coping on state anxiety and positive emotions during and after the Washington, DC sniper killings.

Moore PJ, Chrabaszcz JS, Peterson RA, Rohrbeck CA, Roemer EC, Mercurio AE.

Anxiety Stress Coping. 2014;27(2):138-55. doi: 10.1080/10615806.2013.828202. Epub 2013 Aug 25.

PMID:
23971650
8.

Open hearts build lives: positive emotions, induced through loving-kindness meditation, build consequential personal resources.

Fredrickson BL, Cohn MA, Coffey KA, Pek J, Finkel SM.

J Pers Soc Psychol. 2008 Nov;95(5):1045-62. doi: 10.1037/a0013262.

9.

Terrorism, acute stress, and cardiovascular health: a 3-year national study following the September 11th attacks.

Holman EA, Silver RC, Poulin M, Andersen J, Gil-Rivas V, McIntosh DN.

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Jan;65(1):73-80. doi: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2007.6.

10.

Psychological resilience, positive emotions, and successful adaptation to stress in later life.

Ong AD, Bergeman CS, Bisconti TL, Wallace KA.

J Pers Soc Psychol. 2006 Oct;91(4):730-49.

PMID:
17014296
11.

Psychological resilience after disaster: New York City in the aftermath of the September 11th terrorist attack.

Bonanno GA, Galea S, Bucciarelli A, Vlahov D.

Psychol Sci. 2006 Mar;17(3):181-6.

PMID:
16507055
12.

A national survey of stress reactions after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Schuster MA, Stein BD, Jaycox L, Collins RL, Marshall GN, Elliott MN, Zhou AJ, Kanouse DE, Morrison JL, Berry SH.

N Engl J Med. 2001 Nov 15;345(20):1507-12.

13.

High positive affect shortly after missile attacks and the heightened risk of posttraumatic stress disorder among Israeli adolescents.

Israel-Cohen Y, Kashy-Rosenbaum G, Kaplan O.

J Trauma Stress. 2014 Jun;27(3):375-8. doi: 10.1002/jts.21912. Epub 2014 May 6.

PMID:
24801888
14.

Positive emotions trigger upward spirals toward emotional well-being.

Fredrickson BL, Joiner T.

Psychol Sci. 2002 Mar;13(2):172-5.

PMID:
11934003
15.

Psychological sequelae of remote exposure to the September 11th terrorist attacks in Canadians with and without panic.

Asmundson GJ, Carleton RN, Wright KD, Taylor S.

Cogn Behav Ther. 2004;33(2):51-9.

PMID:
15279310
16.

[Prospective study of post-traumatic stress in victims of terrorist attacks].

Jehel L, Duchet C, Paterniti S, Consoli SM, Guelfi JD.

Encephale. 2001 Sep-Oct;27(5):393-400. French.

PMID:
11760689
17.

Pathways to posttraumatic growth versus posttraumatic stress: coping and emotional reactions following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Park CL, Aldwin CM, Fenster JR, Snyder LB.

Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2008 Jul;78(3):300-12. doi: 10.1037/a0014054.

PMID:
19123749
18.
19.

A changed America? The effects of September 11th on depressive symptoms and alcohol consumption.

Knudsen HK, Roman PM, Johnson JA, Ducharme LJ.

J Health Soc Behav. 2005 Sep;46(3):260-73.

PMID:
16259148
20.

Stress symptoms among African-American college students after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Murphy RT, Wismar K, Freeman K.

J Nerv Ment Dis. 2003 Feb;191(2):108-14.

PMID:
12586964

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