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Items: 1 to 20 of 156

1.

A longitudinal study of category-specific agnosia.

Thomas RM, Forde EM, Humphreys GW, Graham KS.

Neurocase. 2002;8(6):466-79.

PMID:
12529455
2.

The role of local and global processing in the recognition of living and nonliving things.

Thomas R, Forde E.

Neuropsychologia. 2006;44(6):982-6. Epub 2005 Oct 25.

PMID:
16253294
3.

Multiple meaning systems in the brain: a case for visual semantics.

Warrington EK, McCarthy RA.

Neuropsychologia. 1994 Dec;32(12):1465-73.

PMID:
7885576
4.

[Associative visual agnosia. The less visible consequences of a cerebral infarction].

Diesfeldt HF.

Tijdschr Gerontol Geriatr. 2011 Feb;42(1):17-28. Dutch.

PMID:
21400959
5.

A case of integrative visual agnosia.

Riddoch MJ, Humphreys GW.

Brain. 1987 Dec;110 ( Pt 6):1431-62.

PMID:
3427396
6.

Memories are made of this: the effects of time on stored visual knowledge in a case of visual agnosia.

Riddoch MJ, Humphreys GW, Gannon T, Blott W, Jones V.

Brain. 1999 Mar;122 ( Pt 3):537-59.

PMID:
10094261
7.
8.
9.

Associative visual agnosia resulting from a disconnection between intact visual memory and semantic systems.

Carlesimo GA, Casadio P, Sabbadini M, Caltagirone C.

Cortex. 1998 Sep;34(4):563-76.

PMID:
9800090
10.

[A case of integrative visual agnosia].

Hirayama K, Iwasaki S, Yamamoto T, Suzuki K, Kodama N.

Rinsho Shinkeigaku. 1995 Jul;35(7):781-7. Japanese.

PMID:
8777803
11.

Impaired drawing from memory in a visual agnosic patient.

Trojano L, Grossi D.

Brain Cogn. 1992 Nov;20(2):327-44.

PMID:
1449762
12.

Optic aphasia with pure alexia: a mild form of visual associative agnosia? A case study.

Chanoine V, Ferreira CT, Demonet JF, Nespoulous JL, Poncet M.

Cortex. 1998 Jun;34(3):437-48.

PMID:
9669108
13.

Naming without knowing and appearance without associations: evidence for constructive processes in semantic memory?

Laws KR, Evans JJ, Hodges JR, McCarthy RA.

Memory. 1995 Sep-Dec;3(3-4):409-33.

PMID:
8574872
14.

The naming impairment of living and nonliving items in Alzheimer's disease.

Montanes P, Goldblum MC, Boller F.

J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 1995 Jan;1(1):39-48.

PMID:
9375207
15.

Can recognition of living things be selectively impaired?

Farah MJ, McMullen PA, Meyer MM.

Neuropsychologia. 1991;29(2):185-93.

PMID:
2027434
16.
17.

To know what it is for, but not how it is: semantic dissociations in a case of visual agnosia.

Peru A, Avesani R.

Neurocase. 2008;14(3):249-63. doi: 10.1080/13554790802269968.

PMID:
18704832
18.

Associative (prosop)agnosia without (apparent) perceptual deficits: a case-study.

Anaki D, Kaufman Y, Freedman M, Moscovitch M.

Neuropsychologia. 2007 Apr 9;45(8):1658-71. Epub 2007 Jan 13.

PMID:
17320120
19.

Hierarchies, similarity, and interactivity in object recognition: "category-specific" neuropsychological deficits.

Humphreys GW, Forde EM.

Behav Brain Sci. 2001 Jun;24(3):453-76; discussion 476-509. Review.

PMID:
11682799
20.

The role of semantic distance in category-specific impairments for living things: evidence from a case of semantic dementia.

Zannino GD, Perri R, Pasqualetti P, Di Paola M, Caltagirone C, Carlesimo GA.

Neuropsychologia. 2006;44(7):1017-28. Epub 2005 Dec 13.

PMID:
16352319

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