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Items: 1 to 20 of 144

1.

Outbreak of caterpillar dermatitis caused by airborne hairs of the mistletoe browntail moth (Euproctis edwardsi).

Balit CR, Ptolemy HC, Geary MJ, Russell RC, Isbister GK.

Med J Aust. 2001 Dec 3-17;175(11-12):641-3.

PMID:
11837874
2.

Caterpillar dermatitis.

Dunlop K, Freeman S.

Australas J Dermatol. 1997 Nov;38(4):193-5. Review.

PMID:
9431713
3.

The oak processionary caterpillar as the cause of an epidemic airborne disease: survey and analysis.

Maier H, Spiegel W, Kinaciyan T, Krehan H, Cabaj A, Schopf A, Hönigsmann H.

Br J Dermatol. 2003 Nov;149(5):990-7.

PMID:
14632804
4.

Clinical effects of exposure to the White-stemmed gum moth (Chelepteryx collesi).

Balit CR, Geary MJ, Russell RC, Isbister GK.

Emerg Med Australas. 2004 Feb;16(1):74-81.

PMID:
15239759
5.

Sex pheromone of browntail moth, Euproctis chrysorrhea (L.): synthesis and field deployment.

Khrimian A, Lance DR, Schwarz M, Leonhardt BA, Mastro VC.

J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Apr 9;56(7):2452-6. doi: 10.1021/jf073161w. Epub 2008 Mar 12.

PMID:
18333615
6.

Tussockosis: an outbreak of dermatitis caused by tussock moths in Singapore.

Ooi PL, Goh KT, Lee HS, Goh CL.

Contact Dermatitis. 1991 Mar;24(3):197-200.

PMID:
1868703
8.
9.

Gypsy moth-induced dermatitis: a hospital review and community survey.

Kikuchi T, Kobayashi K, Sakata K, Akasaka T.

Eur J Dermatol. 2012 May-Jun;22(3):384-90. doi: 10.1684/ejd.2012.1722.

PMID:
22562801
10.

Systemic allergic reaction to tree processionary caterpillar in children.

Shkalim V, Herscovici Z, Amir J, Levy Y.

Pediatr Emerg Care. 2008 Apr;24(4):233-5. doi: 10.1097/PEC.0b013e31816b7b86.

PMID:
18418262
11.

Epidemic dermatitis due to contact with a moth in Cozumel, Mexico.

Fernandez G, Morales E, Beutelspacher C, Villanueva A, Ruiz C, Stetler HC.

Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1992 May;46(5):560-3.

PMID:
1599050
12.
13.

Population Explosions of Tiger Moth Lead to Lepidopterism Mimicking Infectious Fever Outbreaks.

Wills PJ, Anjana M, Nitin M, Varun R, Sachidanandan P, Jacob TM, Lilly M, Thampan RV, Karthikeya Varma K.

PLoS One. 2016 Apr 13;11(4):e0152787. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0152787. eCollection 2016.

14.

Lepidopterism - oak processionary caterpillar dermatitis: appearance after indirect out-of-season contact.

Maronna A, Stache H, Sticherling M.

J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2008 Sep;6(9):747-50. doi: 10.1111/j.1610-0387.2008.06652.x. Epub 2008 Feb 11. English, German.

PMID:
18266862
15.

An epidemiologic study of gypsy moth rash.

Tuthill RW, Canada AT, Wilcock K, Etkind PH, O'Dell TM, Shama SK.

Am J Public Health. 1984 Aug;74(8):799-803.

16.

Caterpillars and moths: Part I. Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.

Hossler EW.

J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Jan;62(1):1-10; quiz 11-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2009.08.060. Review. Erratum in: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Apr;62(4):666.

PMID:
20082886
17.

Implicating an introduced generalist parasitoid in the invasive browntail moth's enigmatic demise.

Elkinton JS, Parry D, Boettner GH.

Ecology. 2006 Oct;87(10):2664-72.

PMID:
17089674
18.

An epidemic of caterpillar sting dermatitis in a rural West Virginia community.

Walker RB, Thomas T, Cupit D, Giaquinto-Shreves J.

W V Med J. 1993 Feb;89(2):58-60.

PMID:
8442349
19.

The browntail moth, its caterpillar and their rash.

Alexander S.

Clin Exp Dermatol. 1980 Jun;5(2):261. No abstract available.

PMID:
7438521
20.

The browntail moth, its caterpillar and their rash.

de Jong MC.

Clin Exp Dermatol. 1980 Jun;5(2):261. No abstract available.

PMID:
7002383

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