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Items: 1 to 20 of 101

1.

Cannabidiolic acid methyl ester, a stable synthetic analogue of cannabidiolic acid, can produce 5-HT1A receptor-mediated suppression of nausea and anxiety in rats.

Pertwee RG, Rock EM, Guenther K, Limebeer CL, Stevenson LA, Haj C, Smoum R, Parker LA, Mechoulam R.

Br J Pharmacol. 2018 Jan;175(1):100-112. doi: 10.1111/bph.14073. Epub 2017 Dec 5.

2.

Cannabidiolic acid prevents vomiting in Suncus murinus and nausea-induced behaviour in rats by enhancing 5-HT1A receptor activation.

Bolognini D, Rock EM, Cluny NL, Cascio MG, Limebeer CL, Duncan M, Stott CG, Javid FA, Parker LA, Pertwee RG.

Br J Pharmacol. 2013 Mar;168(6):1456-70. doi: 10.1111/bph.12043.

3.
4.

Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of cannabis, attenuates vomiting and nausea-like behaviour via indirect agonism of 5-HT(1A) somatodendritic autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

Rock EM, Bolognini D, Limebeer CL, Cascio MG, Anavi-Goffer S, Fletcher PJ, Mechoulam R, Pertwee RG, Parker LA.

Br J Pharmacol. 2012 Apr;165(8):2620-34. doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01621.x.

5.

Effect of prior foot shock stress and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiolic acid, and cannabidiol on anxiety-like responding in the light-dark emergence test in rats.

Rock EM, Limebeer CL, Petrie GN, Williams LA, Mechoulam R, Parker LA.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2017 Jul;234(14):2207-2217. doi: 10.1007/s00213-017-4626-5. Epub 2017 Apr 20.

PMID:
28424834
6.

Effect of combined doses of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) on acute and anticipatory nausea using rat (Sprague- Dawley) models of conditioned gaping.

Rock EM, Limebeer CL, Parker LA.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2015 Dec;232(24):4445-54. doi: 10.1007/s00213-015-4080-1. Epub 2015 Sep 18.

PMID:
26381155
7.

Neuromotor tolerability and behavioural characterisation of cannabidiolic acid, a phytocannabinoid with therapeutic potential for anticipatory nausea.

Brierley DI, Samuels J, Duncan M, Whalley BJ, Williams CM.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2016 Jan;233(2):243-54. doi: 10.1007/s00213-015-4100-1. Epub 2015 Oct 6.

PMID:
26439367
8.

A comparison of cannabidiolic acid with other treatments for anticipatory nausea using a rat model of contextually elicited conditioned gaping.

Rock EM, Limebeer CL, Navaratnam R, Sticht MA, Bonner N, Engeland K, Downey R, Morris H, Jackson M, Parker LA.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2014 Aug;231(16):3207-15. doi: 10.1007/s00213-014-3498-1. Epub 2014 Mar 5.

PMID:
24595502
9.
10.

Effect of combined oral doses of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) on acute and anticipatory nausea in rat models.

Rock EM, Connolly C, Limebeer CL, Parker LA.

Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2016 Sep;233(18):3353-60. doi: 10.1007/s00213-016-4378-7. Epub 2016 Jul 20.

PMID:
27438607
11.

The phytocannabinoid, Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabivarin, can act through 5-HT₁A receptors to produce antipsychotic effects.

Cascio MG, Zamberletti E, Marini P, Parolaro D, Pertwee RG.

Br J Pharmacol. 2015 Mar;172(5):1305-18. doi: 10.1111/bph.13000.

12.

Motor effects of the non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid cannabidiol that are mediated by 5-HT1A receptors.

Espejo-Porras F, Fernández-Ruiz J, Pertwee RG, Mechoulam R, García C.

Neuropharmacology. 2013 Dec;75:155-63. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2013.07.024. Epub 2013 Aug 4.

PMID:
23924692
13.

Nucleus incertus contributes to an anxiogenic effect of buspirone in rats: Involvement of 5-HT1A receptors.

Kumar JR, Rajkumar R, Lee LC, Dawe GS.

Neuropharmacology. 2016 Nov;110(Pt A):1-14. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2016.07.019. Epub 2016 Jul 18.

14.

5-HT1A receptors are involved in the effects of xaliproden on G-protein activation, neurotransmitter release and nociception.

Martel JC, Assié MB, Bardin L, Depoortère R, Cussac D, Newman-Tancredi A.

Br J Pharmacol. 2009 Sep;158(1):232-42. doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2009.00249.x. Epub 2009 Jun 5.

15.

Anxiolytic effects of prelimbic 5-HT(1A) receptor activation in the hemiparkinsonian rat.

Hui YP, Wang T, Han LN, Li LB, Sun YN, Liu J, Qiao HF, Zhang QJ.

Behav Brain Res. 2015 Jan 15;277:211-20. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2014.04.053. Epub 2014 Jun 4.

PMID:
24906197
16.

In vitro profile of the antidepressant candidate OPC-14523 at rat and human 5-HT1A receptors.

Jordan S, Chen R, Koprivica V, Hamilton R, Whitehead RE, Tottori K, Kikuchi T.

Eur J Pharmacol. 2005 Jul 11;517(3):165-73.

PMID:
15985260
17.

Sensitization of adenylate cyclase by short-term activation of 5-HT1A receptors.

Lisinicchia JG, Watts VJ.

Cell Signal. 2003 Dec;15(12):1111-7.

PMID:
14575866
18.

Signal transduction and functional selectivity of F15599, a preferential post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptor agonist.

Newman-Tancredi A, Martel JC, Assié MB, Buritova J, Lauressergues E, Cosi C, Heusler P, Bruins Slot L, Colpaert FC, Vacher B, Cussac D.

Br J Pharmacol. 2009 Jan;156(2):338-53. doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2008.00001.x. Epub 2009 Jan 12.

19.

Anxiolytic effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, via serotonin 5-HT1A receptors on anxiety-related behaviors in rats experienced aversive stress.

Yamaguchi T, Tsujimatsu A, Kumamoto H, Izumi T, Ohmura Y, Yoshida T, Yoshioka M.

J Ethnopharmacol. 2012 Sep 28;143(2):533-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2012.07.007. Epub 2012 Jul 20.

PMID:
22819689
20.

Interaction of the anxiogenic agent, RS-30199, with 5-HT1A receptors: modulation of sexual activity in the male rat.

Spedding M, Newman-Tancredi A, Millan MJ, Dacquet C, Michel AN, Jacoby E, Vickery B, Tallentire D.

Neuropharmacology. 1998 Jun;37(6):769-80.

PMID:
9707291

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