Format
Sort by
Items per page

Send to

Choose Destination

Links from PubMed

Items: 1 to 20 of 133

1.

Physical changes in the home environment to reduce television viewing and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among 5- to 12-year-old children: a randomized pilot study.

French SA, Sherwood NE, JaKa MM, Haapala JL, Ebbeling CB, Ludwig DS.

Pediatr Obes. 2016 Oct;11(5):e12-5. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12067. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

2.
3.

Impact of Masked Replacement of Sugar-Sweetened with Sugar-Free Beverages on Body Weight Increases with Initial BMI: Secondary Analysis of Data from an 18 Month Double-Blind Trial in Children.

Katan MB, de Ruyter JC, Kuijper LD, Chow CC, Hall KD, Olthof MR.

PLoS One. 2016 Jul 22;11(7):e0159771. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159771. eCollection 2016.

4.

Dietary intakes and physical activity among preschool-aged children living in rural American Indian communities before a family-based healthy lifestyle intervention.

LaRowe TL, Adams AK, Jobe JB, Cronin KA, Vannatter SM, Prince RJ.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jul;110(7):1049-57. doi: 10.1016/j.jada.2010.04.009.

5.

Two-year follow-up of a primary care-based intervention to prevent and manage childhood obesity: the High Five for Kids study.

Rifas-Shiman SL, Taveras EM, Gortmaker SL, Hohman KH, Horan CM, Kleinman KP, Mitchell K, Price S, Prosser LA, Gillman MW.

Pediatr Obes. 2017 Jun;12(3):e24-e27. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12141. Epub 2016 May 27.

6.

A Multicomponent Intervention Helped Reduce Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in Economically Disadvantaged Hispanic Children.

Feng D, Song H, Esperat MC, Black I.

Am J Health Promot. 2016 Nov;30(8):594-603. Epub 2016 Jun 17.

PMID:
26305611
7.

Associations of obesogenic behaviors in mothers and obese children participating in a randomized trial.

Sonneville KR, Rifas-Shiman SL, Kleinman KP, Gortmaker SL, Gillman MW, Taveras EM.

Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Jul;20(7):1449-54. doi: 10.1038/oby.2012.43. Epub 2012 Feb 21.

8.

Secular trends in children's sweetened-beverage consumption (1973 to 1994): the Bogalusa Heart Study.

Rajeshwari R, Yang SJ, Nicklas TA, Berenson GS.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2005 Feb;105(2):208-14.

PMID:
15668676
9.

A mHealth randomized controlled trial to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage intake in preschool-aged children.

Nezami BT, Ward DS, Lytle LA, Ennett ST, Tate DF.

Pediatr Obes. 2018 Nov;13(11):668-676. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12258. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

PMID:
29119719
10.

Effect of sugar-sweetened beverages on body weight in children: design and baseline characteristics of the Double-blind, Randomized INtervention study in Kids.

de Ruyter JC, Olthof MR, Kuijper LD, Katan MB.

Contemp Clin Trials. 2012 Jan;33(1):247-57. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2011.10.007. Epub 2011 Oct 25.

PMID:
22056980
11.
12.

Do weight status and television viewing influence children's subsequent dietary changes? A National Longitudinal Study in the United States.

Chen HJ, Wang Y.

Int J Obes (Lond). 2015 Jun;39(6):931-8. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2015.16. Epub 2015 Feb 10.

13.

Determinants of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in young children: a systematic review.

Mazarello Paes V, Hesketh K, O'Malley C, Moore H, Summerbell C, Griffin S, van Sluijs EM, Ong KK, Lakshman R.

Obes Rev. 2015 Nov;16(11):903-13. doi: 10.1111/obr.12310. Epub 2015 Aug 7. Review.

14.

[Intake of sugar-sweetened non-alcoholic beverages and body mass index: A national sample of Chilean school children].

Araneda J, Bustos P, Cerecera F, Amigo H.

Salud Publica Mex. 2015 Mar-Apr;57(2):128-34. Spanish.

15.

Examination of the association between lifestyle behavior changes and weight outcomes in preschoolers receiving treatment for obesity.

Kuhl ES, Clifford LM, Bandstra NF, Filigno SS, Yeomans-Maldonado G, Rausch JR, Stark LJ.

Health Psychol. 2014 Jan;33(1):95-8. doi: 10.1037/a0032741. Epub 2013 Jul 1.

16.

Decrease in television viewing predicts lower body mass index at 1-year follow-up in adolescents, but not adults.

French SA, Mitchell NR, Hannan PJ.

J Nutr Educ Behav. 2012 Sep-Oct;44(5):415-22. doi: 10.1016/j.jneb.2011.12.008. Epub 2012 May 14.

17.

Regular sugar-sweetened beverage consumption between meals increases risk of overweight among preschool-aged children.

Dubois L, Farmer A, Girard M, Peterson K.

J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jun;107(6):924-34; discussion 934-5.

PMID:
17524711
18.

Children's sugar-sweetened beverages consumption: associations with family and home-related factors, differences within ethnic groups explored.

van de Gaar VM, van Grieken A, Jansen W, Raat H.

BMC Public Health. 2017 Feb 14;17(1):195. doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4095-0.

19.

Sweetened beverage intake in association to energy and sugar consumption and cardiometabolic markers in children.

Seferidi P, Millett C, Laverty AA.

Pediatr Obes. 2018 Apr;13(4):195-203. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12194. Epub 2017 Jan 23.

20.

Readiness to change sugar sweetened beverage intake among college students.

Huffman L, West DS.

Eat Behav. 2007 Jan;8(1):10-4. Epub 2006 May 30.

PMID:
17174846

Supplemental Content

Support Center