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Items: 1 to 20 of 230

1.

In vitro models of tissue penetration and destruction by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Andrian E, Grenier D, Rouabhia M.

Infect Immun. 2004 Aug;72(8):4689-98.

2.
3.

Effect of inactivation of the Arg- and/or Lys-gingipain gene on selected virulence and physiological properties of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Grenier D, Roy S, Chandad F, Plamondon P, Yoshioka M, Nakayama K, Mayrand D.

Infect Immun. 2003 Aug;71(8):4742-8.

4.

Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis outer membrane vesicles on gingipain-mediated detachment of cultured oral epithelial cells and immune responses.

Nakao R, Takashiba S, Kosono S, Yoshida M, Watanabe H, Ohnishi M, Senpuku H.

Microbes Infect. 2014 Jan;16(1):6-16. doi: 10.1016/j.micinf.2013.10.005. Epub 2013 Oct 16.

PMID:
24140554
5.

Role of gingipains R in the pathogenesis of Porphyromonas gingivalis-mediated periodontal disease.

Genco CA, Potempa J, Mikolajczyk-Pawlinska J, Travis J.

Clin Infect Dis. 1999 Mar;28(3):456-65. Review.

PMID:
10194062
6.

Molecular genetics of Porphyromonas gingivalis: gingipains and other virulence factors.

Nakayama K.

Curr Protein Pept Sci. 2003 Dec;4(6):389-95. Review.

PMID:
14683425
8.

Porphyromonas gingivalis gingipains: the molecular teeth of a microbial vampire.

O-Brien-Simpson NM, Veith PD, Dashper SG, Reynolds EC.

Curr Protein Pept Sci. 2003 Dec;4(6):409-26. Review.

PMID:
14683427
9.

Suppression of inflammatory responses of human gingival fibroblasts by gingipains from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

Palm E, Khalaf H, Bengtsson T.

Mol Oral Microbiol. 2015 Feb;30(1):74-85. doi: 10.1111/omi.12073. Epub 2014 Sep 19.

PMID:
25055828
10.

Cleavage of the human C5A receptor by proteinases derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis: cleavage of leukocyte C5a receptor.

Jagels MA, Ember JA, Travis J, Potempa J, Pike R, Hugli TE.

Adv Exp Med Biol. 1996;389:155-64.

PMID:
8861006
11.

Role of RgpA, RgpB, and Kgp proteinases in virulence of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 in a murine lesion model.

O'Brien-Simpson NM, Paolini RA, Hoffmann B, Slakeski N, Dashper SG, Reynolds EC.

Infect Immun. 2001 Dec;69(12):7527-34.

12.

The role of gingipains in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

Imamura T.

J Periodontol. 2003 Jan;74(1):111-8. Review.

PMID:
12593605
13.
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15.

Role of gingipains in growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the presence of human serum albumin.

Grenier D, Imbeault S, Plamondon P, Grenier G, Nakayama K, Mayrand D.

Infect Immun. 2001 Aug;69(8):5166-72.

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17.

Regulation of RANKL and OPG gene expression in human gingival fibroblasts and periodontal ligament cells by Porphyromonas gingivalis: a putative role of the Arg-gingipains.

Belibasakis GN, Bostanci N, Hashim A, Johansson A, Aduse-Opoku J, Curtis MA, Hughes FJ.

Microb Pathog. 2007 Jul;43(1):46-53. Epub 2007 Mar 15.

PMID:
17448630
18.

Gingipain-dependent degradation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway proteins by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis during invasion.

Stafford P, Higham J, Pinnock A, Murdoch C, Douglas CW, Stafford GP, Lambert DW.

Mol Oral Microbiol. 2013 Oct;28(5):366-78. doi: 10.1111/omi.12030. Epub 2013 May 29.

19.

Porphyromonas gingivalis-mediated shedding of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) by oral epithelial cells: a potential role in inflammatory periodontal disease.

Feldman M, La VD, Lombardo Bedran TB, Palomari Spolidorio DM, Grenier D.

Microbes Infect. 2011 Dec;13(14-15):1261-9. doi: 10.1016/j.micinf.2011.07.009. Epub 2011 Jul 28.

PMID:
21835259
20.

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