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J Clin Neurosci. 2015 Feb;22(2):387-90. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2014.07.015. Epub 2014 Oct 8.

Successful subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation therapy after significant lead displacement from a subdural hematoma.

Author information

1
Mercy Brain and Spine, Mercy Medical Center, 1111 6th Avenue, East Tower, B level, Des Moines, IA 50314, USA. Electronic address: ehenderson@mercydesmoines.org.
2
MRI Interventions, Irvine, CA, USA.
3
Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.
4
Department of Neurological Surgery, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
5
Department of Neurological Surgery, Center for Neuromodulation, Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.
6
Department of Neurology, Center for Neuromodulation, Wexner Medical Center at the Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

Abstract

A 57-year-old man with a 21 year history of Parkinson's disease underwent bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS) placement. One week postoperatively he developed an acute left subdural hematoma from a fall with significant displacement of the DBS leads. It was promptly evacuated, the patient slowly recovered neurologically, and the leads again moved near to the original position. Six months of stimulation therapy attained 50% reduction in symptoms. This case report demonstrates the movement of DBS leads due to brain shift and their ability to come back to previous location once the brain shift is corrected.

KEYWORDS:

Deep brain stimulation; Electrode displacement; Lead displacement; Lead shift; Subdural hematoma

PMID:
25304438
PMCID:
PMC4610158
DOI:
10.1016/j.jocn.2014.07.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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