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North Clin Istanb. 2016 May 2;3(1):15-21. doi: 10.14744/nci.2016.48403. eCollection 2016.

Relationship between newborn craniotabes and vitamin D status.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Bulent Ecevit University, Zonguldak, Turkey.
2
Children's Health and Diseases Clinic, Dr. Lutfi Kirdar Kartal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
3
Children's Health and Diseases Clinic, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
4
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry, Bulent Ecevit University, Zonguldak, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In recent studies, vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy and early infancy has been reported to predispose children to many chronic diseases, except those of the skeletal system. The aim of this study was to investigate whether craniotabes in otherwise healthy newborns is physiological, its relationship to vitamin D deficiency and whether or not it requires treatment.

METHODS:

A total of 150 healthy newborns with a weight of over 2000 g were included. Newborns were divided into two groups during postnatal discharge (1-3.'s day): those with and without craniotabes. The 25-hydroxy (OH) vitamin D levels of the newborns' mothers were measured, and all infants were re-evaluated for craniotabes, as well as tested to determine levels of serum calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25(OH) vitamin D, urine calcium and creatinine.

RESULTS:

Craniotabes was present in 45 (30%) of newborns enrolled in the study. Craniotabes of the newborns born during the winter months was significantly higher. PTH level was significantly higher in 1-month-old newborns with craniotabes than those without craniotabes. No relationship was observed between diet and craniotabes, but in exclusively breastfed infants, vitamin D level was statistically significantly lower. No statistically significant difference was found in the occurrence of craniotabes in newborns with or without vitamin D support.

CONCLUSION:

The relationship between newborn craniotabes and maternal vitamin D deficiency is not clear. However, the present study illustrates that maternal vitamin D deficiency is still a major problem. Therefore, measures to prevent maternal vitamin D deficiency should be strengthened.

KEYWORDS:

Craniotabes; newborn; vitamin D deficiency

Conflict of interest statement

No conflict of interest was declared by the authors.

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