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Anatol J Cardiol. 2016 Jan;16(1):16-22. doi: 10.5152/akd.2015.5708.

Comparison of the effects of metoprolol or carvedilol on serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and uric acid levels among patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST segment elevation.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Atatürk University; Erzurum-Turkey. lutfuaskin23@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and uric acid levels measured in patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST segment elevation (NSTEMI) are important in diagnosis and in predicting the prognosis of the disease. There is a limited number of clinical studies investigating the effects of beta-blockers on GGT and uric acid levels in these patients. In our study, we aimed to investigate the effects of beta-blocker therapy on GGT and uric acid levels.

METHODS:

We conducted a randomized, prospective clinical study. Hundred patients with NSTEMI were included in this study, and they were divided into two groups. Fifty patients were administered metoprolol succinate treatment (1 x 50 mg), whereas the remaining 50 patients were administered carvedilol treatment (2 x 12.5 mg). Thereafter, all of the patients underwent coronary angiography. Blood samples were taken at the time of admission, at the 1st month, and 3rd month to detect GGT and uric acid levels.

RESULTS:

There was no statistically significant difference among the metoprolol or carvedilol groups in terms of the GGT levels measured at the baseline, 1st month, and 3rd month (p=0.904 and p=0.573, respectively). In addition, there was no statistically significant difference among the metoprolol or carvedilol groups in terms of uric acid levels measured at the baseline, 1st month, and 3rd month (p=0.601 and p=0.601, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

We found that GGT and uric acid levels did not show any change compared to the baseline values, with metoprolol and carvedilol treatment initiated in the early period in patients with NSTEMI.

PMID:
26467358
PMCID:
PMC5336699
DOI:
10.5152/akd.2015.5708
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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