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Items: 1 to 20 of 178

1.

Non-neuronal cell outgrowth in C. elegans.

Ghosh S, Vetrone SA, Sternberg PW.

Worm. 2017 Nov 14;6(3-4):e1405212. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2017.1405212. eCollection 2017. Review.

PMID:
29238627
2.

Chaperone-directed ubiquitylation maintains proteostasis at the expense of longevity.

Pokrzywa W, Lorenz R, Hoppe T.

Worm. 2017 Sep 5;6(2):e1371403. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2017.1371403. eCollection 2017.

3.

Molting in C. elegans.

Lažetić V, Fay DS.

Worm. 2017 May 17;6(1):e1330246. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2017.1330246. eCollection 2017. Review.

4.

sta-1 is repressed by mir-58 family in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Lozano E, de Lucas MP, Sáez AG.

Worm. 2016 Sep 21;5(4):e1238560. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2016.1238560. eCollection 2016.

5.

GExplore 1.4: An expanded web interface for queries on Caenorhabditis elegans protein and gene function.

Hutter H, Suh J.

Worm. 2016 Sep 19;5(4):e1234659. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2016.1234659. eCollection 2016.

6.

SKN-1-independent transcriptional activation of glutathione S-transferase 4 (GST-4) by EGF signaling.

Detienne G, Van de Walle P, De Haes W, Schoofs L, Temmerman L.

Worm. 2016 Aug 31;5(4):e1230585. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2016.1230585. eCollection 2016.

7.

Leveraging the withered tail tip phenotype in C. elegans to identify proteins that influence membrane properties.

Svensk E, Biermann J, Hammarsten S, Magnusson F, Pilon M.

Worm. 2016 Jun 28;5(3):e1206171. eCollection 2016.

8.

Probing and rearranging the transcription factor network controlling the C. elegans endoderm.

Wiesenfahrt T, Osborne Nishimura E, Berg JY, McGhee JD.

Worm. 2016 Jun 10;5(3):e1198869. eCollection 2016.

9.
10.

Mechanism of chromatin segregation to the nuclear periphery in C. elegans embryos.

Gonzalez-Sandoval A, Gasser SM.

Worm. 2016 May 31;5(3):e1190900. eCollection 2016.

11.
12.

New insights into old worm proteomes.

Zimmerman SM, Kim SK.

Worm. 2016 May 4;5(3):e1184391. eCollection 2016.

13.

Globin-based redox signaling.

De Henau S, Braeckman BP.

Worm. 2016 Apr 29;5(3):e1184390. eCollection 2016.

14.

Marriage shrines and worms impacting our understanding of mammalian fertilization.

Krauchunas AR, Singson A.

Worm. 2016 May 24;5(3):e1184389. eCollection 2016.

15.

Interplay between redox and protein homeostasis.

Feleciano DR, Arnsburg K, Kirstein J.

Worm. 2016 Mar 30;5(2):e1170273. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2016.1170273. eCollection 2016 Apr-Jun. Review.

16.

Hitting two birds with one stone: The unforeseen consequences of nested gene knockouts in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Jovelin R, Cutter AD.

Worm. 2016 Apr 6;5(2):e1156835. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2016.1156835. eCollection 2016 Apr-Jun.

17.

A joint graph inference case study: the C. elegans chemical and electrical connectomes.

Chen L, Vogelstein JT, Lyzinski V, Priebe CE.

Worm. 2016 Mar 16;5(2):e1142041. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2016.1142041. eCollection 2016 Apr-Jun.

18.

Another morphogenetic movement on the map: Charting dorsal intercalation in C. elegans.

Walck-Shannon E, Hardin J.

Worm. 2016 Apr 12;5(2):e1176664. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2016.1176664. eCollection 2016 Apr-Jun.

19.

Why motor proteins team up - Intraflagellar transport in C. elegans cilia.

Mijalkovic J, Prevo B, Peterman EJ.

Worm. 2016 Mar 30;5(2):e1170275. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2016.1170275. eCollection 2016 Apr-Jun.

20.

The adhesion GPCR latrophilin - a novel signaling cascade in oriented cell division and anterior-posterior polarity.

Winkler J, Prömel S.

Worm. 2016 Mar 30;5(2):e1170274. doi: 10.1080/21624054.2016.1170274. eCollection 2016 Apr-Jun.

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