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PLoS One. 2012;7(12):e51132. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0051132. Epub 2012 Dec 12.

Cognitive functions in middle aged individuals are related to metabolic disturbances and aerobic capacity: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
The Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism at Department of Infectious Disease, Rigshospitalet, The Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. mariapedersen@dadlnet.dk

Abstract

AIMS:

Metabolic disturbances may contribute to cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes. We investigated the relation between cognitive impairment and metabolic deteriorations, low physical fitness, low-grade inflammation and abdominal obesity in middle aged individuals.

METHODS:

We conducted a cross-sectional study including 40 to 65 year-old patients with type 2 diabetes and limited co morbidity (N = 56), age-matched individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (N = 56) as well as age-matched controls with normal glucose tolerance (N = 72). Specific cognitive functions were assessed with focus on verbal memory, processing speed, executive functions, and a composite overall mean score. Oral glucose tolerance test, VO(2)max test, systemic inflammation, DXA scanning and abdominal MRI were measured.

RESULTS:

Multiple linear regression analyses adjusting for age, gender and verbal intelligence demonstrated that a low score in processing speed, executive functions and overall cognitive function were related to high fasting C-peptide, as well as low insulin sensitivity, beta-cell function and VO(2)max. Measurements of blood glucose, obesity and inflammation were not associated with cognitive function.

CONCLUSION:

Low cognitive scores are seen in middle aged individuals with hyperinsulinemia, low insulin sensitivity, beta-cell function and low aerobic capacity. These findings emphasize the importance of appropriate lifestyle and not only blood glucose control in prevention of cognitive disability.

PMID:
23251434
PMCID:
PMC3521021
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0051132
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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