Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2017 Apr 4;7(1):635. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-00279-5.

The population genetic structure of Corythucha ciliata (Say) (Hemiptera: Tingidae) provides insights into its distribution and invasiveness.

Author information

1
School of Horticulture and Plant Protection & Institute of Applied Entomology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009, China.
2
Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200438, China.
3
Department of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, USA.
4
School of Horticulture and Plant Protection & Institute of Applied Entomology, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009, China. yzdu@yzu.edu.cn.
5
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Co-Innovation Center for Modern Production Technology of Grain Crops, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, 225009, China. yzdu@yzu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Corythucha ciliata (Say), an invasive pest originating from North America, causes severe damage on sycamore trees. However, little is known about the population genetics and evolutionary forces underlying the invasiveness of this important pest. In the present study, we use three mitochondrial genes (COI, ND1 and ND5) and nine microsatellite markers to investigate the population genetics of C. ciliata and retrace its spread through China. The results suggest a low level of genetic diversity in Chinese and European populations of C. ciliata. Our results indicate that populations of C. ciliata have obvious genetic structure, and genetic differentiation is not caused by geographic isolation. In median-joining networks, we observed a higher frequency of shared haplotypes in groups 1 and 3. Based on gene flow and approximate Bayesian computation analyses, we discovered that C. ciliata first invaded the east coast of China and subsequently moved inland. Demographic analysis suggested that populations of C. ciliata in China may have undergone a recent bottleneck effect. Finally, our results suggest that population structure, high gene flow and environmental conditions have favored the broad invasiveness of this important pest.

PMID:
28377573
PMCID:
PMC5428010
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-00279-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center