PMID- 30118495
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20190212
LR  - 20190329
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 13
IP  - 8
DP  - 2018
TI  - Prevalence and correlates of hazardous alcohol consumption and binge drinking
      among men who have sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco.
PG  - e0202170
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0202170 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVES: To describe heavy alcohol use patterns and correlates in a diverse
      sample of MSM. METHODS: We used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) to enroll 252
      alcohol-using MSM in San Francisco from March 2015-July 2017. We examined heavy
      alcohol use patterns and conducted RDS-adjusted multivariable analyses to
      characterize correlates of hazardous alcohol consumption and binge drinking.
      RESULTS: RDS-adjusted prevalence of weekly and at least weekly binge drinking was
      24.9% and 19.3%, respectively. Hazardous consumption was common; prevalence of
      mid- and high-levels of hazardous drinking was 11.4% and 29.9%, respectively. In 
      multivariable analyses, identifying as Hispanic/Latino or mixed/other race; being
      moderately or extremely interested in reducing alcohol use; ever receiving
      alcohol treatment; using ecstasy; reporting syphilis diagnosis; and having more
      than 5 male partners were independently associated with hazardous alcohol
      consumption. Less hazardous consumption was associated with having a bachelor's
      degree or completing post-graduate studies; and not being in a relationship.
      Reporting chlamydia infection; being somewhat, moderately or extremely interested
      in reducing alcohol use; and having multiple male sex partners were associated
      with higher odds of at least weekly binge drinking. Lower odds of binge drinking 
      were associated with completing post-graduate studies. Moreover, for the outcomes
      of hazardous alcohol consumption and binge-drinking, we observed significant
      interaction effects between race/ethnicity and interest in reducing alcohol, past
      receipt of alcohol treatment, use of ecstasy, syphilis diagnosis, and number of
      male partners. CONCLUSION: Among alcohol-using MSM in San Francisco, heavy
      drinking patterns were common and independently associated with greater number of
      male sexual partners and sexually transmitted infections (STI). Moreover,
      significant racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities related to heavy alcohol 
      use were observed and race/ethnicity modified the effect of the risk factors
      associated with these outcomes. These findings underscore the need to develop
      more MSM-specific interventions that jointly address heavy alcohol use and
      HIV/STI risk, as well as culturally-tailored and targeted strategies to alleviate
      health disparities.
FAU - Santos, Glenn-Milo
AU  - Santos GM
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0003-1009-5317
AD  - Center for Public Health Research, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San
      Francisco, California, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Community Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of
      California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
FAU - Rowe, Christopher
AU  - Rowe C
AD  - Center for Public Health Research, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San
      Francisco, California, United States of America.
AD  - School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California,
      United States of America.
FAU - Hern, Jaclyn
AU  - Hern J
AD  - The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine,
      Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Walker, John E
AU  - Walker JE
AD  - Center for Public Health Research, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San
      Francisco, California, United States of America.
FAU - Ali, Arsheen
AU  - Ali A
AD  - Center for Public Health Research, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San
      Francisco, California, United States of America.
FAU - Ornelaz, Marcial
AU  - Ornelaz M
AD  - Center for Public Health Research, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San
      Francisco, California, United States of America.
FAU - Prescott, Maximo
AU  - Prescott M
AD  - Center for Public Health Research, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San
      Francisco, California, United States of America.
AD  - School of Public Health, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California,
      United States of America.
FAU - Coffin, Phillip
AU  - Coffin P
AD  - Center for Public Health Research, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San
      Francisco, California, United States of America.
AD  - Division of HIV, ID & Global Medicine, University of California, San Francisco,
      California, United States of America.
FAU - McFarland, Willi
AU  - McFarland W
AD  - Center for Public Health Research, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San
      Francisco, California, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of
      California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
FAU - Raymond, H Fisher
AU  - Raymond HF
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, New
      Jersey, United States of America.
LA  - eng
GR  - DP5 OD019809/OD/NIH HHS/United States
GR  - UG1 DA015815/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
DEP - 20180817
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology
MH  - Alcohol-Related Disorders/complications/*epidemiology
MH  - Cross-Sectional Studies
MH  - Health Risk Behaviors
MH  - *Homosexuality, Male
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Prevalence
MH  - San Francisco/epidemiology
MH  - Sexual Partners
MH  - Sexual and Gender Minorities
MH  - Sexually Transmitted Diseases/complications/epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC6097698
COIS- The authors of this article declare no conflicts. Co-author Phillip Coffin has
      directed NIH-funded studies that have received donated medications from Alkermes 
      (2013-2015) to treat methamphetamine dependence and Gilead (2016-2017) to treat
      Hepatitis C infections. This does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on
      sharing data and materials.
EDAT- 2018/08/18 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/13 06:00
CRDT- 2018/08/18 06:00
PHST- 2017/08/16 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/07/30 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/08/18 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/08/18 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/13 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0202170 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-17-30349 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2018 Aug 17;13(8):e0202170. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0202170.
      eCollection 2018.