PMID- 29390149
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190411
IS  - 1537-6613 (Electronic)
IS  - 0022-1899 (Linking)
VI  - 217
IP  - 9
DP  - 2018 Apr 11
TI  - Cord Blood Antiparasite Interleukin 10 as a Risk Marker for Compromised Vaccine
      Immunogenicity in Early Childhood.
PG  - 1426-1434
LID - 10.1093/infdis/jiy047 [doi]
AB  - Background: Antenatal exposure to parasites can affect infants' subsequent
      responses to vaccination. The present study investigated how maternal prenatal
      infections and newborns' antiparasite cytokine profiles relate to immunoglobulin 
      G (IgG) responses to standard vaccination during infancy. Methods: A total of 450
      Kenyan women were tested for parasitic infections during pregnancy. Their
      newborns' responses to Plasmodium falciparum, schistosome, and filaria antigens
      were assessed in cord blood lymphocytes. Following standard neonatal vaccination,
      this infant cohort was followed biannually to age 30 months for measurement of
      circulating IgG levels against Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib), diphtheria toxoid 
      (DT), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and tetanus toxoid. Results: Trajectories of
      postvaccination IgG levels were classified by functional principal component (PC)
      analysis to assess each child's response profile. Two main components, PC1,
      reflecting height of response over time, and PC2, reflecting crossover from high 
      to low responses or from low to high responses, were identified. Cord blood
      cytokine responses to schistosome and filarial antigens showed a significant
      association between augmented antihelminth interleukin 10 and reduced antibody
      levels, particularly to DT and HBV, and a more rapid postvaccination decline in
      circulating IgG levels against Hib. Conclusion: Antenatal sensitization to
      schistosomiasis or filariasis and related production of antiparasite interleukin 
      10 at birth are associated with reduced antivaccine IgG levels in infancy, with
      possibly impaired protection.
FAU - Malhotra, Indu
AU  - Malhotra I
AD  - Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University,
      Cleveland, Ohio.
AD  - Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative, Case Western Reserve
      University, Cleveland, Ohio.
FAU - LaBeaud, A Desiree
AU  - LaBeaud AD
AD  - Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University,
      Cleveland, Ohio.
AD  - Child Health Research Institute, Stanford, California.
FAU - Morris, Nathan
AU  - Morris N
AD  - Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative, Case Western Reserve
      University, Cleveland, Ohio.
FAU - McKibben, Maxim
AU  - McKibben M
AD  - Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University,
      Cleveland, Ohio.
FAU - Mungai, Peter
AU  - Mungai P
AD  - Division of Vector Borne and Neglected Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Public
      Health and Sanitation, Nairobi, Kenya.
FAU - Muchiri, Eric
AU  - Muchiri E
AD  - Division of Vector Borne and Neglected Tropical Diseases, Ministry of Public
      Health and Sanitation, Nairobi, Kenya.
FAU - King, Christopher L
AU  - King CL
AD  - Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University,
      Cleveland, Ohio.
FAU - King, Charles H
AU  - King CH
AD  - Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University,
      Cleveland, Ohio.
LA  - eng
GR  - R01 AI064687/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - United States
TA  - J Infect Dis
JT  - The Journal of infectious diseases
JID - 0413675
PMC - PMC5894090
EDAT- 2018/02/02 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/02 06:00
CRDT- 2018/02/02 06:00
PHST- 2017/07/30 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/01/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/02/02 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/02 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/02/02 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 4829506 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/infdis/jiy047 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Infect Dis. 2018 Apr 11;217(9):1426-1434. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy047.