PMID- 28832587
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20171019
LR  - 20181113
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 8
DP  - 2017
TI  - Social venue range and referral chain impact: Implications for the sampling of
      hidden communities.
PG  - e0181494
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0181494 [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: It has been argued that the success of respondent-driven sampling
      (RDS) in generating unbiased estimates for epidemiologic outcomes depends on
      participants' abilities to generate long referral chains. While this is thought
      to depend on the number of people participants know in the target population,
      this idea is rarely tested. Furthermore, little attention has been paid to the
      role of other aspects of social connectedness in recruitment, such as
      participants' involvement in local clubs and venues. METHODS: We examine whether 
      the recruitment potential of young Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM)
      depends on (1) their social network size and (2) their affiliations with a
      variety of sex venues across geographic areas. We analyze data from a 2014 RDS
      study of 598 YBMSM on the south side of Chicago. RESULTS: Both a participant's
      personal network size and the number of different types of sex venues with which 
      he was affiliated were significantly positively associated with (1) the total
      number of recruits in the participant's prospective referral chains and (2) the
      lengths of those chains. However, only venue affiliation remain significantly
      associated with recruitment potential in the multivariate model. CONCLUSIONS: The
      success of RDS in generating valid samples may depend more on recruiting
      participants who are involved in multiple venues within the community (i.e.,
      their affiliation networks) than on recruiting those who have large personal
      social networks.
FAU - Cornwell, Benjamin
AU  - Cornwell B
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3204-1213
AD  - Department of Sociology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, United States of
      America.
FAU - Schneider, John A
AU  - Schneider JA
AD  - Departments of Medicine & Public Health Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago,
      Illinois, United States of America.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170823
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Chicago/epidemiology
MH  - HIV Infections/epidemiology
MH  - Homosexuality, Male
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - *Referral and Consultation
MH  - Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
MH  - *Social Support
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5568219
EDAT- 2017/08/24 06:00
MHDA- 2017/10/20 06:00
CRDT- 2017/08/24 06:00
PHST- 2017/01/11 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/07/03 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/08/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/08/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/10/20 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0181494 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-17-00208 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 Aug 23;12(8):e0181494. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0181494.
      eCollection 2017.