PMID- 28510581
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170906
LR  - 20181113
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 12
IP  - 5
DP  - 2017
TI  - Association between the hyperuricemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease risk
      in a Chinese population: A retrospective cohort study.
PG  - e0177249
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0177249 [doi]
AB  - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common chronic disease associated
      with high levels of serum uric acid (SUA). However, whether this relationship
      applies in obese subjects has been unclear, and no cohort study has previously
      been conducted in non-obese subjects. We therefore performed a retrospective
      cohort study among employees of seven companies in China to investigate whether
      hyperuricemia was independently associated with NAFLD in obese and non-obese
      subjects, respectively. A total of 2383 initially NAFLD-free subjects were
      followed up for four years, and 15.2% (363/2383) developed NAFLD. Hyperuricemia
      subjects had a higher cumulative incidence than did those with normouricemia
      (29.0% vs. 12.9%, P<0.001). Cox proportional hazard regression analyses showed
      that baseline hyperuricemia was significantly associated with risk of developing 
      NAFLD in non-obese subjects. This relationship was significantly independent of
      baseline age, gender, metabolic syndrome components, and other clinical variables
      (RR = 1.389, 95%CI: 1.051-2.099). However, this association did not exist in
      obese subjects (RR = 1.010, 95%CI: 0.649-1.571). The independent effect of
      hyperuricemia on NAFLD was stronger in females (RR = 2.138, 95%CI: 1.050-4.355)
      than in males (RR = 1.435, 95%CI: 1.021-2.018). In conclusion, further studies
      are needed to explore the different mechanisms between obese and non-obese
      subjects, and the reason hyperuricemia raises NAFLD risk in females more than in 
      males.
FAU - Yang, Chao
AU  - Yang C
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Health statistics, School of Public Health,
      Southwest medical University, Luzhou, China.
FAU - Yang, Shujuan
AU  - Yang S
AD  - Department of Health Related Social and Behavioral Science, West China School of 
      Public Health, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
FAU - Xu, Weiwei
AU  - Xu W
AD  - Health Management Department, the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine,
      Southwest Medical University, Luzhou, China.
FAU - Zhang, Junhui
AU  - Zhang J
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Health statistics, School of Public Health,
      Southwest medical University, Luzhou, China.
FAU - Fu, Wenguang
AU  - Fu W
AD  - Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery the First Affiliated Hospital, College of
      Medicine, Southwest Medical University, Luzhou, China.
FAU - Feng, Chunhong
AU  - Feng C
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5914-1260
AD  - Health Management Department, the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine,
      Southwest Medical University, Luzhou, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170516
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB  - IM
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Aged, 80 and over
MH  - *Asian Continental Ancestry Group
MH  - China/epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - Hyperuricemia/*blood/*complications
MH  - Incidence
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/*epidemiology/*etiology
MH  - Obesity/complications
MH  - *Population Surveillance
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Risk Assessment
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5433681
EDAT- 2017/05/17 06:00
MHDA- 2017/09/07 06:00
CRDT- 2017/05/17 06:00
PHST- 2017/02/23 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/04/24 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/05/17 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/05/17 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/09/07 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0177249 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-17-06674 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2017 May 16;12(5):e0177249. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0177249.
      eCollection 2017.