PMID- 28148231
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20180202
LR  - 20181113
IS  - 1471-2407 (Electronic)
IS  - 1471-2407 (Linking)
VI  - 17
IP  - 1
DP  - 2017 Feb 2
TI  - Cancer mortality in former East and West Germany: a story of unification?
PG  - 94
LID - 10.1186/s12885-017-3086-y [doi]
AB  - BACKGROUND: Health and social conditions vary between West and East Germany.
      METHODS: We analyzed annual mortality data of all recorded deaths caused by lung,
      colorectal, breast and prostate cancer in Germany as they are published by the
      Federal Bureau of Statistics (FBS) encompassing the period 1980-2014 for former
      West Germany (WG) and 1990-2014 for former East Germany (EG). To compare East and
      West Germany we computed the ratio of the mortality rates in both parts
      (mortality rate ratio, MRR, <1 indicates a lower mortality in EG). Forecasting
      methods of time series analyses were applied (model selection based on the
      Box/Jenkins approach) to predict 5-year trends until 2019. RESULTS: Lung cancer: 
      In women mortality rose in both regions (WG: +2.8%, 1991-2014, EG: +2.2%,
      1990-2014). In men mortality in WG declined between -2.1% and -1.2%, and by -2.7%
      (1993-2009) in EG which was followed by a plateau. Colorectal cancer: A decline
      was found in both WG (-3.1%, 1993-2014) and EG women (-3.8%, 1993-2008 and -2.0%,
      2008-2014). A decline in EG men since 1992 (-0.9%, 1992-1997 and -2.3%,
      1997-2014) mirrors the development in WG (-2.6%, 1995-2014). Breast cancer:
      Constant mortality decline in WG after 1996. In EG a decline (-2.4%, 1992-2007)
      was followed by a plateau with an MRR <1 (1990-2014). Prostate cancer: In WG a
      decline (-3.4%) came to a hold after 2007, while there was a constant decline of 
      1.5% in EG. The forecast indicated that mortality of colorectal/lung cancer in
      men and breast cancer reaches a plateau in future years. CONCLUSION: Courses of
      mortality were similar between East and West, while existing differences are
      likely to remain in the near future.
FAU - Medenwald, Daniel
AU  - Medenwald D
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0001-8920-2853
AD  - Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Halle (Saale),
      Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120, Halle (Saale), Germany. daniel.medenwald@uk-halle.de.
AD  - Institute of Medical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Informatics,
      Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Str. 8, 06112, Halle
      (Saale), Germany. daniel.medenwald@uk-halle.de.
FAU - Vordermark, Dirk
AU  - Vordermark D
AD  - Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Halle (Saale),
      Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120, Halle (Saale), Germany.
FAU - Dietzel, Christian T
AU  - Dietzel CT
AD  - Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Halle (Saale),
      Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120, Halle (Saale), Germany.
LA  - eng
PT  - Comparative Study
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20170202
PL  - England
TA  - BMC Cancer
JT  - BMC cancer
JID - 100967800
SB  - IM
MH  - Breast Neoplasms/*mortality
MH  - Colorectal Neoplasms/*mortality
MH  - Female
MH  - Germany, East/epidemiology
MH  - Germany, West/epidemiology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Lung Neoplasms/*mortality
MH  - Male
MH  - Mortality/trends
MH  - Population Forecast
MH  - Prostatic Neoplasms/*mortality
PMC - PMC5288858
EDAT- 2017/02/06 06:00
MHDA- 2018/02/03 06:00
CRDT- 2017/02/03 06:00
PHST- 2016/06/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2017/01/24 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2017/02/03 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2017/02/06 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/02/03 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1186/s12885-017-3086-y [doi]
AID - 10.1186/s12885-017-3086-y [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - BMC Cancer. 2017 Feb 2;17(1):94. doi: 10.1186/s12885-017-3086-y.