PMID- 27404387
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20170719
LR  - 20170719
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 11
IP  - 7
DP  - 2016
TI  - Risk Factors for Bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) in Cattle in Ethiopia.
PG  - e0159083
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0159083 [doi]
AB  - Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) infection is generally correlated with individual
      cattle's age, sex, body condition, and with husbandry practices such as herd
      composition, cattle movement, herd size, production system and proximity to
      wildlife-including bTB maintenance hosts. We tested the correlation between those
      factors and the prevalence of bTB, which is endemic in Ethiopia's highland
      cattle, in the Afar Region and Awash National Park between November 2013 and
      April 2015. A total of 2550 cattle from 102 herds were tested for bTB presence
      using the comparative intradermal tuberculin test (CITT). Data on herd structure,
      herd movement, management and production system, livestock transfer, and contact 
      with wildlife were collected using semi-structured interviews with cattle herders
      and herd owners. The individual overall prevalence of cattle bTB was 5.5%, with a
      herd prevalence of 46%. Generalized Linear Mixed Models with a random herd-effect
      were used to analyse risk factors of cattle reactors within each herd. The older 
      the age of the cattle and the lower the body condition the higher the chance of a
      positive bTB test result, but sex, lactation status and reproductive status were 
      not correlated with bTB status. At herd level, General Linear Models showed that 
      pastoral production systems with transhumant herds had a higher bTB prevalence
      than sedentary herds. A model averaging analysis identified herd size, contact
      with wildlife, and the interaction of herd size and contact with wildlife as
      significant risk factors for bTB prevalence in cattle. A subsequent Structural
      Equation Model showed that the probability of contact with wildlife was
      influenced by herd size, through herd movement. Larger herds moved more and
      grazed in larger areas, hence the probability of grazing in an area with wildlife
      and contact with either infected cattle or infected wildlife hosts increased,
      enhancing the chances for bTB infection. Therefore, future bTB control strategies
      in cattle in pastoral areas should consider herd size and movement as important
      risk factors.
FAU - Dejene, Sintayehu W
AU  - Dejene SW
AD  - Resource Ecology Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
AD  - College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, Dire
      Dawa, Ethiopia.
FAU - Heitkonig, Ignas M A
AU  - Heitkonig IM
AD  - Resource Ecology Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
FAU - Prins, Herbert H T
AU  - Prins HH
AD  - Resource Ecology Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
FAU - Lemma, Fitsum A
AU  - Lemma FA
AD  - College of Veterinary Medicine, Haramaya University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.
FAU - Mekonnen, Daniel A
AU  - Mekonnen DA
AD  - College of Veterinary Medicine, Haramaya University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia.
FAU - Alemu, Zelalem E
AU  - Alemu ZE
AD  - College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, Dire
      Dawa, Ethiopia.
FAU - Kelkay, Tessema Z
AU  - Kelkay TZ
AD  - College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, Dire
      Dawa, Ethiopia.
FAU - de Boer, Willem F
AU  - de Boer WF
AD  - Resource Ecology Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20160712
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB  - IM
EIN - PLoS One. 2017 Apr 20;12 (4):e0176654. PMID: 28426770
MH  - Animals
MH  - Cattle
MH  - Ethiopia
MH  - Female
MH  - Male
MH  - Risk Factors
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
MH  - Tuberculin Test
MH  - Tuberculosis, Bovine/diagnosis/*epidemiology
PMC - PMC4942063
EDAT- 2016/07/13 06:00
MHDA- 2017/07/20 06:00
CRDT- 2016/07/13 06:00
PHST- 2016/03/30 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2016/06/27 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2016/07/13 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2016/07/13 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2017/07/20 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0159083 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-16-09969 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2016 Jul 12;11(7):e0159083. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0159083.
      eCollection 2016.