PMID- 26395342
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20160504
LR  - 20180429
IS  - 1753-4887 (Electronic)
IS  - 0029-6643 (Linking)
VI  - 73 Suppl 3
DP  - 2015 Oct
TI  - Diet, growth, and obesity development throughout childhood in the Avon
      Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.
PG  - 175-206
LID - 10.1093/nutrit/nuv054 [doi]
AB  - Publications from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children covering
      diet, growth, and obesity development during childhood are reviewed. Diet was
      assessed by food frequency questionnaires and food records. Growth data were
      collected by routine measurements, and in standardized clinics, body fatness was 
      assessed by bioelectrical impedance and DXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry)
      scans. Diets changed dramatically during the preschool period with an increase in
      the intake of free (added) sugars (12.3% rising to 16.4% of energy) that remained
      similar until adolescence. This was due to increased intake of energy-dense,
      nutrient-poor foods. Two periods of rapid growth were identified; infancy and
      mid-childhood (ages 7-11 y) and both were associated with obesity development.
      Diets with high energy density were associated with increasing fat mass from
      mid-childhood until adolescence. Genetic and dietary factors showed independent
      associations with increasing adiposity. At all ages studied, there were dietary
      inequalities related to maternal educational attainment that may influence
      inequalities found in obesity development. The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents
      and Children has provided valuable insights into how disparities in diet and
      growth may affect the development of ill health in adulthood.
CI  - (c) The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the
      International Life Sciences Institute.
FAU - Emmett, Pauline M
AU  - Emmett PM
AD  - P.M. Emmett is with the Centre for Child and Adolescent Health, School of Social 
      and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.L.R. Jones
      is with the School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol,
      Bristol, United Kingdom. p.m.emmett@bristol.ac.uk.
FAU - Jones, Louise R
AU  - Jones LR
AD  - P.M. Emmett is with the Centre for Child and Adolescent Health, School of Social 
      and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.L.R. Jones
      is with the School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol,
      Bristol, United Kingdom.
LA  - eng
GR  - 102215/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom
GR  - MC_PC_15018/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
GR  - 092731/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom
GR  - 74882/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
PT  - Review
PL  - United States
TA  - Nutr Rev
JT  - Nutrition reviews
JID - 0376405
RN  - 0 (Dietary Carbohydrates)
SB  - IM
MH  - Adiposity/genetics
MH  - Body Composition
MH  - Body Mass Index
MH  - Child
MH  - *Child Development
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - *Diet
MH  - Diet Records
MH  - Diet Surveys
MH  - Dietary Carbohydrates/administration & dosage
MH  - Educational Status
MH  - Energy Intake
MH  - England
MH  - Feeding Behavior
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Longitudinal Studies
MH  - Nutritive Value
MH  - Parents
MH  - Pediatric Obesity/*epidemiology/etiology/genetics
MH  - Surveys and Questionnaires
PMC - PMC4586450
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - ALSPAC
OT  - childhood diet
OT  - diet
OT  - energy density
OT  - fat mass
OT  - fruit and vegetables
OT  - growth
OT  - inequality
OT  - obesity
OT  - sugar
EDAT- 2015/09/24 06:00
MHDA- 2016/05/05 06:00
CRDT- 2015/09/24 06:00
PHST- 2015/09/24 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2015/09/24 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2016/05/05 06:00 [medline]
AID - nuv054 [pii]
AID - 10.1093/nutrit/nuv054 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Nutr Rev. 2015 Oct;73 Suppl 3:175-206. doi: 10.1093/nutrit/nuv054.