PMID- 30497048
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Process
LR  - 20190106
IS  - 1872-6283 (Electronic)
IS  - 0379-0738 (Linking)
VI  - 294
DP  - 2019 Jan
TI  - Fatal poisoning involving cyclopropylfentanyl - Investigation of time-dependent
      postmortem redistribution.
PG  - 80-85
LID - S0379-0738(18)30777-1 [pii]
LID - 10.1016/j.forsciint.2018.11.007 [doi]
AB  - A growing number of fatal overdoses involving opioid drugs, in particular
      involving fentanyl and its analogues, pose an immense threat to public health.
      Postmortem casework of forensic toxicologists in such cases is challenging, as
      data on pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties as well as reference
      values for acute toxicities and data on potential postmortem redistribution (PMR)
      mechanisms often do not exist. A fatal case involving cyclopropylfentanyl was
      investigated at the Zurich Institute of Forensic Medicine and the Zurich Forensic
      Science Institute; an unknown powder found at the scene was reliably identified
      as cyclopropylfentanyl by gas chromatography-infrared spectroscopy (GC-IR).
      Femoral blood samples were collected at two time points after death; 11h
      postmortem (t1) and during the medico-legal autopsy 29h after death (t2). At the 
      autopsy, additional samples from the heart blood, urine and gastric content were 
      collected. Cyclopropylfentanyl was quantified using a validated liquid
      chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method. Femoral blood
      concentration of cyclopropylfentanyl at autopsy was 19.8ng/mL (t1=15.7ng/mL;
      heart blood concentration at autopsy=52.4ng/mL). In the light of the current
      literature and under the exclusion that no other morphological findings could
      explain the cause of death, contribution of cyclopropylfentanyl to death was
      proposed (polydrug use). Significant postmortem concentration increases of
      cyclopropylfentanyl in femoral blood during 18h after the first sampling were
      observed, thus indicating a relevant potential to undergo PMR. A
      central-to-peripheral blood concentration ratio of 2.6 supports this.
      Consequently, the current case suggests that postmortem cyclopropylfentanyl
      concentration should always be interpreted with care.
CI  - Copyright (c) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
FAU - Brockbals, Lana
AU  - Brockbals L
AD  - Department of Forensic Pharmacology and Toxicology, Zurich Institute of Forensic 
      Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
FAU - Staeheli, Sandra N
AU  - Staeheli SN
AD  - Department of Forensic Pharmacology and Toxicology, Zurich Institute of Forensic 
      Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
FAU - Gentile, Simon
AU  - Gentile S
AD  - Department of Forensic Medicine & Imaging, Zurich Institute of Forensic Medicine,
      University of Zurich, Switzerland.
FAU - Schlaepfer, Markus
AU  - Schlaepfer M
AD  - Zurich Forensic Science Institute, Zurich, Switzerland.
FAU - Bissig, Christian
AU  - Bissig C
AD  - Zurich Forensic Science Institute, Zurich, Switzerland.
FAU - Bolliger, Stephan A
AU  - Bolliger SA
AD  - Department of Forensic Medicine & Imaging, Zurich Institute of Forensic Medicine,
      University of Zurich, Switzerland.
FAU - Kraemer, Thomas
AU  - Kraemer T
AD  - Department of Forensic Pharmacology and Toxicology, Zurich Institute of Forensic 
      Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
FAU - Steuer, Andrea E
AU  - Steuer AE
AD  - Department of Forensic Pharmacology and Toxicology, Zurich Institute of Forensic 
      Medicine, University of Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address:
      andrea.steuer@irm.uzh.ch.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181116
PL  - Ireland
TA  - Forensic Sci Int
JT  - Forensic science international
JID - 7902034
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Alternative matrices
OT  - Cyclopropylfentanyl
OT  - Fentanyl analogue
OT  - LC-MS/MS
OT  - Time-dependent postmortem redistribution
EDAT- 2018/11/30 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/30 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/20 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/07 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2018/11/12 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/30 06:00 [entrez]
AID - S0379-0738(18)30777-1 [pii]
AID - 10.1016/j.forsciint.2018.11.007 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Forensic Sci Int. 2019 Jan;294:80-85. doi: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2018.11.007. Epub 
      2018 Nov 16.

PMID- 29980853
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20181126
LR  - 20181126
IS  - 1432-1459 (Electronic)
IS  - 0340-5354 (Linking)
VI  - 265
IP  - 9
DP  - 2018 Sep
TI  - Dysfunctional inhibitory control in Parkinson's disease patients with
      levodopa-induced dyskinesias.
PG  - 2088-2096
LID - 10.1007/s00415-018-8945-1 [doi]
AB  - INTRODUCTION: Chronic dopamine replacement therapies in Parkinson's disease can
      induce side effects, such as levodopa-induced dyskinesias and impulse control
      disorders. A dysfunction of inhibitory brain networks has been related to both
      disorders; however, there is no clear behavioral evidence supporting this
      hypothesis. We aimed to determine whether PD patients with levodopa-induced
      dyskinesias show features of increased impulsivity in parallel with altered motor
      inhibition. METHODS: Two matched samples of Parkinson's disease patients with (n 
      = 14) or without (n = 14) levodopa-induced dyskinesias and a control group (n =
      10) participated in the study. All groups were evaluated by the Barratt
      Impulsiveness Scale-11 to assess impulsivity traits. Furthermore, participants
      performed a stop signal task to evaluate reactive-motor inhibition and a Go/NoGo 
      task to evaluate proactive-inhibitory control. PD patients were tested both in
      OFF and ON levodopa medication. RESULTS: Parkinson's disease patients with
      levodopa-induced dyskinesias showed higher impulsivity scores than PD patients
      without levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Dyskinetic patients presented also delayed 
      stop signal reaction times indicating a worse performance in reactive inhibition.
      The slowness in inhibiting a motor command correlated with the impulsiveness
      scores. Furthermore, in the dyskinetic group, a positive correlation was found
      between stop reaction times and the severity of involuntary movements. Under the 
      effect of levodopa, all patients were faster but dyskinetic patients were
      significantly less accurate in proactive inhibition. CONCLUSION: Inhibitory
      control is compromised in dyskinetic patients in parallel with increased
      impulsivity, revealing an impairment of motor and behavioral inhibitory control
      in Parkinson's disease patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesias.
FAU - Picazio, Silvia
AU  - Picazio S
AD  - Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Unit, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina,
      306, 00179, Rome, Italy.
FAU - Ponzo, Viviana
AU  - Ponzo V
AD  - Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Unit, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina,
      306, 00179, Rome, Italy.
FAU - Caltagirone, Carlo
AU  - Caltagirone C
AD  - Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Unit, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina,
      306, 00179, Rome, Italy.
AD  - Department of System Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier,
      1, 00133, Rome, Italy.
FAU - Brusa, Livia
AU  - Brusa L
AD  - UOC Neurologia, Ospedale S. Eugenio, Piazzale dell'Umanesimo, 10, 00144, Rome,
      Italy.
FAU - Koch, Giacomo
AU  - Koch G
AD  - Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Unit, IRCCS Santa Lucia Foundation, Via Ardeatina,
      306, 00179, Rome, Italy. g.koch@hsantalucia.it.
AD  - Stroke Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Policlinic Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier,
      1, 00133, Rome, Italy. g.koch@hsantalucia.it.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20180706
PL  - Germany
TA  - J Neurol
JT  - Journal of neurology
JID - 0423161
RN  - 0 (Antiparkinson Agents)
RN  - 46627O600J (Levodopa)
SB  - IM
MH  - Aged
MH  - Antiparkinson Agents/adverse effects/therapeutic use
MH  - Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced/*physiopathology/psychology
MH  - Female
MH  - Humans
MH  - *Impulsive Behavior/drug effects
MH  - Levodopa/adverse effects/therapeutic use
MH  - Male
MH  - *Motor Activity/drug effects
MH  - Parkinson Disease/drug therapy/*physiopathology/psychology
MH  - Reaction Time/drug effects
OTO - NOTNLM
OT  - Go/NoGo
OT  - Impulsivity
OT  - Levodopa-induced dyskinesia
OT  - Motor inhibition
OT  - Parkinson's disease
OT  - Stop-signal task
EDAT- 2018/07/08 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/07/08 06:00
PHST- 2018/02/01 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/06/18 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/05/28 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2018/07/08 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/07/08 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1007/s00415-018-8945-1 [doi]
AID - 10.1007/s00415-018-8945-1 [pii]
PST - ppublish
SO  - J Neurol. 2018 Sep;265(9):2088-2096. doi: 10.1007/s00415-018-8945-1. Epub 2018
      Jul 6.

PMID- 30047405
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20181126
LR  - 20181126
IS  - 1474-547X (Electronic)
IS  - 0140-6736 (Linking)
VI  - 391
IP  - 10137
DP  - 2018 Jun 9
TI  - Resolution on snakebite envenoming adopted at the WHA.
PG  - 2311
LID - S0140-6736(18)31314-X [pii]
LID - 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31314-X [doi]
FAU - Burki, Talha
AU  - Burki T
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20180607
PL  - England
TA  - Lancet
JT  - Lancet (London, England)
JID - 2985213R
RN  - 0 (Antivenins)
SB  - AIM
SB  - IM
MH  - Animals
MH  - Antivenins/*economics/therapeutic use
MH  - Global Health/*legislation & jurisprudence
MH  - Humans
MH  - Rural Population/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Snake Bites/complications/mortality/*prevention & control/therapy
EDAT- 2018/07/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/07/27 06:00
PHST- 2018/07/27 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/07/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - S0140-6736(18)31314-X [pii]
AID - 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31314-X [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Lancet. 2018 Jun 9;391(10137):2311. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31314-X. Epub 2018
      Jun 7.

PMID- 30462630
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20181126
LR  - 20181227
IS  - 1545-861X (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-2195 (Linking)
VI  - 67
IP  - 46
DP  - 2018 Nov 23
TI  - Lead in Spices, Herbal Remedies, and Ceremonial Powders Sampled from Home
      Investigations for Children with Elevated Blood Lead Levels - North Carolina,
      2011-2018.
PG  - 1290-1294
LID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6746a2 [doi]
AB  - The number of pediatric cases of elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) are decreasing
      in North Carolina. However, one county reported an increase in the number of
      children with confirmed BLLs >/=5 mug/dL (CDC reference value,
      https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/acclpp/blood_lead_levels.htm), from 27 in 2013 to
      44 in 2017. Many children with elevated BLLs in this county lived in new housing,
      but samples of spices, herbal remedies, and ceremonial powders from their homes
      contained high levels of lead. Children with chronic lead exposure might suffer
      developmental delays and behavioral problems (https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/). In
      1978, lead was banned from house paint in the United States (1); however,
      children might consume spices and herbal remedies daily. To describe the problem 
      of lead in spices, herbal remedies, and ceremonial powders, the North Carolina
      Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (NCCLPPP) retrospectively examined
      properties where spices, herbal remedies, and ceremonial powders were sampled
      that were investigated during January 2011-January 2018, in response to confirmed
      elevated BLLs among children. NCCLPPP identified 59 properties (6.0% of all 983
      properties where home lead investigations had been conducted) that were
      investigated in response to elevated BLLs in 61 children. More than one fourth
      (28.8%) of the spices, herbal remedies, and ceremonial powders sampled from these
      homes contained >/=1 mg/kg lead. NCCLPPP developed a survey to measure
      child-specific consumption of these products and record product details for
      reporting to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Lead contamination of
      spices, herbal remedies, and ceremonial powders might represent an important
      route of childhood lead exposure, highlighting the need to increase product
      safety. Setting a national maximum allowable limit for lead in spices and herbal 
      remedies might further reduce the risk for lead exposure from these substances.
FAU - Angelon-Gaetz, Kim A
AU  - Angelon-Gaetz KA
FAU - Klaus, Christen
AU  - Klaus C
FAU - Chaudhry, Ezan A
AU  - Chaudhry EA
FAU - Bean, Deidre K
AU  - Bean DK
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181123
PL  - United States
TA  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
JT  - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report
JID - 7802429
RN  - 0 (Powders)
RN  - 2P299V784P (Lead)
SB  - IM
MH  - Ceremonial Behavior
MH  - Child
MH  - Child, Preschool
MH  - Environmental Exposure/adverse effects/statistics & numerical data
MH  - Housing
MH  - Humans
MH  - Infant
MH  - Lead/*analysis/blood
MH  - Lead Poisoning/*epidemiology/ethnology
MH  - North Carolina/epidemiology
MH  - Plants, Medicinal/*chemistry
MH  - Powders/*chemistry
MH  - Retrospective Studies
MH  - Spices/*analysis
PMC - PMC6289082
COIS- All authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE form for disclosure of
      potential conflicts of interest. No potential conflicts of interest were
      disclosed.
EDAT- 2018/11/22 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/22 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/22 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/11/22 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.15585/mmwr.mm6746a2 [doi]
PST - epublish
SO  - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Nov 23;67(46):1290-1294. doi:
      10.15585/mmwr.mm6746a2.

PMID- 30475921
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20181220
IS  - 1553-7404 (Electronic)
IS  - 1553-7390 (Linking)
VI  - 14
IP  - 11
DP  - 2018 Nov
TI  - A suppressor of a wtf poison-antidote meiotic driver acts via mimicry of the
      driver's antidote.
PG  - e1007836
LID - 10.1371/journal.pgen.1007836 [doi]
AB  - Meiotic drivers are selfish alleles that subvert gametogenesis to increase their 
      transmission into progeny. Drivers impose a fitness cost, putting pressure on the
      genome to evolve suppressors. Here we investigate the wtf gene family from
      Schizosaccharomyces pombe, previously shown to contain meiotic drivers in wild
      isolates. We discovered that wtf13 found in lab stocks is a meiotic driver. wtf13
      kills spores that do not inherit it by generating both a diffusible poison and a 
      spore-specific antidote. Additionally, we demonstrate that wtf13 is suppressed by
      another wtf gene, wtf18-2, that arose spontaneously in the lab and makes only an 
      antidote. Wtf18-2 does not act indiscriminately to prevent spore destruction.
      Instead, it rescues only the spores that inherit wtf18-2. In this way, wtf18-2
      selfishly gains a transmission advantage of its own while dampening the drive of 
      wtf13. This establishes a novel paradigm for meiotic drive suppressors and
      provides insight into the mechanisms and evolution of drive systems.
FAU - Bravo Nunez, Maria Angelica
AU  - Bravo Nunez MA
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6554-8814
AD  - Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO, United States of
      America.
FAU - Lange, Jeffrey J
AU  - Lange JJ
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4970-6269
AD  - Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO, United States of
      America.
FAU - Zanders, Sarah E
AU  - Zanders SE
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1867-986X
AD  - Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO, United States of
      America.
AD  - Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Kansas Medical 
      Center, Kansas City, KS, United States of America.
LA  - eng
GR  - DP2 GM132936/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
GR  - F99 CA234523/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R00 GM114436/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20181126
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS Genet
JT  - PLoS genetics
JID - 101239074
PMC - PMC6283613
COIS- I have read the journal's policy and the authors of this manuscript have the
      following competing interests: MABN and SEZ are inventors on patent application
      based on wtf killers. Patent application 834 serial 62/491,107. JJL declares no
      competing interests.
EDAT- 2018/11/27 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/11/27 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/10 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/11/16 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/12/06 00:00 [revised]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pgen.1007836 [doi]
AID - PGENETICS-D-18-01789 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS Genet. 2018 Nov 26;14(11):e1007836. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1007836.
      eCollection 2018 Nov.

PMID- 29787584
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DCOM- 20181126
LR  - 20181126
IS  - 1932-6203 (Electronic)
IS  - 1932-6203 (Linking)
VI  - 13
IP  - 5
DP  - 2018
TI  - Method overtness, forensic autopsy, and the evidentiary suicide note: A
      multilevel National Violent Death Reporting System analysis.
PG  - e0197805
LID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0197805 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Higher prevalence of suicide notes could signify more conservatism in 
      accounting and greater proneness to undercounting of suicide by method. We tested
      two hypotheses: (1) an evidentiary suicide note is more likely to accompany
      suicides by drug-intoxication and by other poisoning, as less violent and less
      forensically overt methods, than suicides by firearm and hanging/suffocation; and
      (2) performance of a forensic autopsy attenuates any observed association between
      overtness of method and the reported presence of a note. METHODS: This multilevel
      (individual/county), multivariable analysis employed a generalized linear mixed
      model (GLMM). Representing the 17 states participating in the United States
      National Violent Death Reporting System throughout 2011-2013, the study
      population comprised registered suicides, aged 15 years and older. Decedents
      totaled 32,151. The outcome measure was relative odds of an authenticated suicide
      note. RESULTS: An authenticated suicide note was documented in 31% of the suicide
      cases. Inspection of the full multivariable model showed a suicide note was more 
      likely to manifest among drug intoxication (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.70; 95%
      CI, 1.56, 1.85) and other poisoning suicides (OR, 2.12; 1.85, 2.42) than firearm 
      suicides, the referent. Respective excesses were larger when there was no autopsy
      or autopsy status was unknown (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.61, 2.14) and (OR, 2.25; 95%
      CI, 1.86, 2.72) relative to the comparisons with a forensic autopsy (OR, 1.62,
      95% CI, 1.45, 1.82 and OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.66, 2.43). Hanging/suffocation
      suicides did not differ from the firearm referent given an autopsy. CONCLUSIONS: 
      Suicide requires substantial affirmative evidence to establish manner of death,
      and affirmation of drug intoxication suicides appears to demand an especially
      high burden of proof. Findings and their implications argue for more stringent
      investigative standards, better training, and more resources to support
      comprehensive and accurate case ascertainment, as the foundation for developing
      evidence-based suicide prevention initiatives.
FAU - Rockett, Ian R H
AU  - Rockett IRH
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-4584-9337
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, 
      United States of America.
AD  - Injury Control Research Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West
      Virginia, United States of America.
FAU - Caine, Eric D
AU  - Caine ED
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New 
      York, United States of America.
AD  - Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention, University of Rochester
      Medical Center, Rochester, New York, United States of America.
FAU - Stack, Steven
AU  - Stack S
AD  - Department of Criminal Justice, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, United
      States of America.
AD  - Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Wayne State University,
      Detroit, Michigan, United States of America.
FAU - Connery, Hilary S
AU  - Connery HS
AD  - Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse, McLean Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts,
      United States of America.
AD  - Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United
      States of America.
FAU - Nolte, Kurt B
AU  - Nolte KB
AD  - Office of the Medical Investigator, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, 
      Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States of America.
FAU - Lilly, Christa L
AU  - Lilly CL
AD  - Department of Biostatistics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia,
      United States of America.
FAU - Miller, Ted R
AU  - Miller TR
AD  - Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Calverton, Maryland, United States
      of America.
AD  - Curtin University School of Public Health, Perth, Australia.
FAU - Nelson, Lewis S
AU  - Nelson LS
AD  - Department of Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New 
      Jersey, United States of America.
FAU - Putnam, Sandra L
AU  - Putnam SL
AD  - Injury Control Research Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West
      Virginia, United States of America.
FAU - Nestadt, Paul S
AU  - Nestadt PS
AUID- ORCID: 0000-0002-2479-703X
AD  - Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
AD  - Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School
      of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
FAU - Jia, Haomiao
AU  - Jia H
AD  - School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States of
      America.
AD  - Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia
      University, New York, New York, United States of America.
LA  - eng
GR  - U54 GM104942/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/United States
GR  - R49 CE002109/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
GR  - R49 CE002093/CE/NCIPC CDC HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
DEP - 20180522
PL  - United States
TA  - PLoS One
JT  - PloS one
JID - 101285081
SB  - IM
MH  - Adolescent
MH  - Adult
MH  - Aged
MH  - Asphyxia/*epidemiology
MH  - Autopsy
MH  - Drug Overdose/*epidemiology
MH  - Female
MH  - Forensic Pathology
MH  - Humans
MH  - Male
MH  - Middle Aged
MH  - Multilevel Analysis
MH  - Poisoning/*epidemiology
MH  - Registries
MH  - Suicide/*statistics & numerical data
MH  - United States/epidemiology
MH  - Wounds, Gunshot/*epidemiology
MH  - Young Adult
PMC - PMC5963755
COIS- The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.
EDAT- 2018/05/23 06:00
MHDA- 2018/11/27 06:00
CRDT- 2018/05/23 06:00
PHST- 2017/12/15 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/05/09 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2018/05/23 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2018/05/23 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2018/11/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1371/journal.pone.0197805 [doi]
AID - PONE-D-17-43882 [pii]
PST - epublish
SO  - PLoS One. 2018 May 22;13(5):e0197805. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0197805.
      eCollection 2018.