PMID- 30701617
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190213
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 30
TI  - Effect of combining pre-exercise carbohydrate intake and repeated short sprints
      on the blood glucose response to moderate-intensity exercise in young individuals
      with Type 1 diabetes.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13914 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To determine whether pre-exercise ingestion of carbohydrates to maintain
      stable glycaemia during moderate-intensity exercise results in excessive
      hyperglycaemia if combined with repeated sprints in individuals with Type 1
      diabetes. METHODS: Eight overnight-fasted people with Type 1 diabetes completed
      the following four 40-min exercise sessions on separate days in a randomized
      counterbalanced order under basal insulinaemic conditions: continuous
      moderate-intensity exercise at 50% V O 2 peak; intermittent high-intensity
      exercise (moderate-intensity exercise interspersed with 4-s sprints every 2 min
      and a final 10-s sprint); continuous moderate-intensity exercise with prior
      carbohydrate intake (~10 g per person); and intermittent high-intensity exercise 
      with prior carbohydrate intake. Venous blood was sampled during and 2 h after
      exercise to measure glucose and lactate levels. RESULTS: The difference in
      marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood glucose curve between continuous
      moderate-intensity exercise + prior carbohydrate and intermittent high-intensity 
      exercise + prior carbohydrate during exercise and recovery was not significant
      [0.2 mmol/l (95% CI -0.7, 1.1); P = 0.635], nor was the difference in peak blood 
      glucose level after adjusting for baseline level [0.2 mmol/l (95% CI -0.7, 1.1); 
      P = 0.695]. The difference in marginal mean time-averaged area under the blood
      glucose curve between continuous moderate-intensity and intermittent
      high-intensity exercise during exercise and recovery was also not significant
      [-0.2 mmol/l (95% CI -1.2, 0.8); P = 0.651]. CONCLUSIONS: When carbohydrates are 
      ingested prior to moderate-intensity exercise, adding repeated sprints is not
      significantly detrimental to glycaemic management in overnight fasted people with
      Type 1 diabetes under basal insulin conditions.
CI  - (c) 2019 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Soon, W H K
AU  - Soon WHK
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5424-3927
AD  - Division of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, The University of Western Australia,
      Perth.
AD  - School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth.
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth.
FAU - Guelfi, K J
AU  - Guelfi KJ
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0412-8901
AD  - School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth.
FAU - Davis, E A
AU  - Davis EA
AD  - Division of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, The University of Western Australia,
      Perth.
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth.
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Perth Children's Hospital, Nedlands,
      Western Australia, Australia.
FAU - Smith, G J
AU  - Smith GJ
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth.
FAU - Jones, T W
AU  - Jones TW
AD  - Division of Paediatrics, School of Medicine, The University of Western Australia,
      Perth.
AD  - Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth.
AD  - Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Perth Children's Hospital, Nedlands,
      Western Australia, Australia.
FAU - Fournier, P A
AU  - Fournier PA
AD  - School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth.
LA  - eng
GR  - Y15g-FOUP/Diabetes Australia
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190130
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/02/01 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/01 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/01 06:00
PHST- 2019/01/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/01 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/01 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13914 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Jan 30. doi: 10.1111/dme.13914.

PMID- 30701607
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190131
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 30
TI  - Heart failure among people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus: real-world data of 289 
      954 people from a diabetes database.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13915 [doi]
AB  - AIM: Comparing people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus with and without heart
      failure in terms of metabolic control, therapeutic regimen and comorbidities.
      METHODS: The Prospective Diabetes Registry (DPV) is a longitudinal documentation 
      system for demographics, medical care and outcome in people with diabetes
      mellitus. It consists of follow-up data from people with diabetes mellitus who
      have agreed to be recorded in the registry. Clinical data are submitted by
      general practitioners, specialists and clinics throughout Germany and Austria.
      Some 289 954 people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (years 2000 to 2015) were
      analysed using demographic statistics and adjustment for confounders based on
      linear and logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: People with Type 2 diabetes
      mellitus (ICD code: E11) and heart failure (ICD code: I50) (N = 14 723) were
      older, more often women and presented with longer diabetes duration compared with
      those without heart failure. After adjustment for age, gender and diabetes
      duration, people with heart failure showed lower HbA1c , higher BMI and more
      intense insulin therapy. Analysis revealed that people with heart failure were
      more often treated with insulin, and more frequently received anti-hypertensives 
      and lipid-lowering medication. They presented with lower systolic and diastolic
      BP. People with heart failure more frequently showed a history of comorbidities. 
      CONCLUSION: Heart failure is common in diabetes mellitus, but the prevalence in
      the DPV is lower frequent than expected. The reason for improved metabolic
      control in heart failure may be intensified therapy with insulin, lipid-lowering 
      medication and anti-hypertensives in this cohort. This article is protected by
      copyright. All rights reserved.
CI  - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
FAU - Stoyanova, D
AU  - Stoyanova D
AD  - Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Diabeteszentrum, Bad Oeynhausen, Universitat Ulm, 
      Ulm.
FAU - Stratmann, B
AU  - Stratmann B
AD  - Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Diabeteszentrum, Bad Oeynhausen, Universitat Ulm, 
      Ulm.
FAU - Schwandt, A
AU  - Schwandt A
AD  - Institut fur Epidemiologie und medizinische Biometrie, ZIBMT, Universitat Ulm,
      Ulm.
AD  - Deutsches Zentrum fur Diabetesforschung DZD, Munchen-Neuherberg, Geislingen.
FAU - Heise, N
AU  - Heise N
AD  - ALB FILS KLINIKEN, Helfenstein Klinik Geislingen, Medizinische Klinik,
      Geislingen.
FAU - Muhldorfer, S
AU  - Muhldorfer S
AD  - Klinikum Bayreuth GmbH, Medizinische Klinik 1, Klinik fur Gastroenterologie,
      Bayreuth.
FAU - Ziegelasch, H-J
AU  - Ziegelasch HJ
AD  - MVZ Schwerin West GmbH, Schwerin, Bad Aibling, Germany.
FAU - Zimmermann, A
AU  - Zimmermann A
AD  - Diabeteszentrum Praxis Zimmermann, Bad Aibling, Germany.
FAU - Tschoepe, D
AU  - Tschoepe D
AD  - Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Diabeteszentrum, Bad Oeynhausen, Universitat Ulm, 
      Ulm.
FAU - Holl, R W
AU  - Holl RW
AD  - Institut fur Epidemiologie und medizinische Biometrie, ZIBMT, Universitat Ulm,
      Ulm.
AD  - Deutsches Zentrum fur Diabetesforschung DZD, Munchen-Neuherberg, Geislingen.
CN  - DPV Initiative
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190130
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/02/01 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/01 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/01 06:00
PHST- 2019/02/01 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/02/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/01 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13915 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Jan 30. doi: 10.1111/dme.13915.

PMID- 30701596
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190212
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 30
TI  - Understanding adolescent and parent acceptability and feasibility experience in a
      large Type 1 diabetes mellitus behavioural trial.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13913 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: Using an 18-month, multisite randomized control trial as an exemplar, the
      aim of this study was to identify themes related to adolescent and parental
      feasibility and acceptability for participation in large behavioural trials
      designed to improve adolescents' Type 1 diabetes self-management. METHODS:
      Thematic analysis methodology was used to develop themes describing factors
      related to acceptability and feasibility. RESULTS: Based on a sample of
      interviews (N = 72), factors contributing to intervention acceptability and
      feasibility were identified. Aspects of acceptability included: a framework for
      goal-setting, the coach as a non-judgemental listener, perception of an ongoing
      benefit to participation and the delivery mode. Aspects of feasibility included: 
      participants' altruism to help adolescents with Type 1 diabetes; pre-enrolment
      preparation for intervention content and duration; and the option of remote
      intervention delivery via telephone or video, which minimized travel time and
      costs. In addition, participants described positive outcomes including
      improvements in behaviour, Type 1 diabetes self-management behaviours and
      parent-adolescent communication, and emotion-attitude changes. Participants also 
      described potential revisions that may inform future trials. CONCLUSIONS:
      Acceptability and feasibility of behavioural interventions with adolescents with 
      chronic illness have multifactorial dimensions. While empowering adolescent
      self-management, parental support is also an under-appreciated aspect to
      consider. Potential revisions were identified for subsequent behavioural trials.
CI  - (c) 2019 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Grossoehme, D H
AU  - Grossoehme DH
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5654-0693
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine,
      Cincinnati, OH.
AD  - Divisions of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center,
      Cincinnati, OH.
FAU - Smith, E
AU  - Smith E
AD  - Divisions of Endocrinology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center,
      Cincinnati, OH.
FAU - Standiford, D
AU  - Standiford D
AD  - Divisions of Endocrinology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center,
      Cincinnati, OH.
FAU - Morwessel, N
AU  - Morwessel N
AD  - Divisions of Endocrinology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center,
      Cincinnati, OH.
FAU - Kichler, J
AU  - Kichler J
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine,
      Cincinnati, OH.
AD  - Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital
      Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.
FAU - Maahs, D M
AU  - Maahs DM
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4602-7909
AD  - Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
FAU - Driscoll, K
AU  - Driscoll K
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, The
      Children's Hospital of Colorado, Aurora, CO.
FAU - Seid, M
AU  - Seid M
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine,
      Cincinnati, OH.
AD  - Divisions of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center,
      Cincinnati, OH.
AD  - James M. Anderson Center for Healthy System Excellence, Cincinnati Children's
      Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
LA  - eng
GR  - UC4/GF/NIH HHS/United States
GR  - DK101131/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
GR  - UC4 DK101132/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190130
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/02/01 06:00
MHDA- 2019/02/01 06:00
CRDT- 2019/02/01 06:00
PHST- 2019/01/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/02/01 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/02/01 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/02/01 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13913 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Jan 30. doi: 10.1111/dme.13913.

PMID- 30698865
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190130
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 36
IP  - 2
DP  - 2019 Feb
TI  - Assessing the outcomes of pregnancies of women with diabetes.
PG  - 139-141
LID - 10.1111/dme.13849 [doi]
FAU - Cundy, T
AU  - Cundy T
AD  - Diabetic Medicine, Auckland, New Zealand.
AD  - Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of
      Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
FAU - Holt, R I G
AU  - Holt RIG
AD  - Diabetic Medicine, Southampton, UK.
AD  - Human Development and Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton,
      Southampton, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Editorial
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/01/31 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/31 06:00
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13849 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Feb;36(2):139-141. doi: 10.1111/dme.13849.

PMID- 30698864
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190130
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 36
IP  - 2
DP  - 2019 Feb
TI  - Gestational diabetes and adiposity are independent risk factors for perinatal
      outcomes: a population based cohort study in Sweden.
PG  - 151-157
LID - 10.1111/dme.13843 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To evaluate the interaction effects of gestational diabetes (GDM) with
      obesity on perinatal outcomes. METHODS: A population-based cohort study in Sweden
      excluding women without pre-gestational diabetes with a singleton birth between
      1998 and 2012. Logistic regression was performed to evaluate the potential
      independent associations of GDM and BMI with adverse perinatal outcomes as well
      as their interactions. Main outcome measures were malformations, stillbirths,
      perinatal mortality, low Apgar score, fetal distress, prematurity and Erb's
      palsy. RESULTS: Some 1,294,006 women were included, with a GDM prevalence of 1%
      (n = 14,833). The rate of overweight/obesity was 67.7% in the GDM-group and 36.1%
      in the non-GDM-group. No significant interaction existed. Offspring of women with
      GDM had significantly increased risk of malformations, adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 
      1.16 (95% confidence intervals 1.06-1.26), prematurity, aOR 1.86 (1.76-1. 98),
      low Apgar score, aOR 1.36 (1.10-1.70), fetal distress, aOR 1.09 (1.02-1.16) and
      Erb's palsy aOR 2.26 (1.79-2.86). No risk for stillbirth or perinatal mortality
      was seen. Offspring of overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2) ), obese (BMI 30-34.9
      kg/m(2) ) and severely obese women (BMI >/= 35.0 kg/m(2) ) had significantly
      increased risks of all outcomes including stillbirth 1.51 (1.40-1.62) to 2.85
      (2.52-3.22) and perinatal mortality 1.49 (1.40-1.59) to 2.83 (2.54-3.15).
      CONCLUSIONS: There is no interaction effect between GDM and BMI for the studied
      outcomes. Higher BMI and GDM are major independent risk factors for most serious 
      adverse perinatal outcomes. More effective pre-pregnancy and antenatal
      interventions are required to prevent serious adverse pregnancy outcomes among
      women with either GDM or high BMI.
CI  - (c) 2018 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on
      behalf of Diabetes UK.
FAU - Hilden, K
AU  - Hilden K
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3707-6696
AD  - Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School of Medical Sciences, Orebro
      University, Orebro, Sweden.
FAU - Hanson, U
AU  - Hanson U
AD  - School of Medical Sciences, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden.
AD  - Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
FAU - Persson, M
AU  - Persson M
AD  - Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska
      Universitetssjukhuset, Solna, Sweden.
FAU - Magnuson, A
AU  - Magnuson A
AD  - Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medical Sciences, Orebro
      University, Orebro, Sweden.
FAU - Simmons, D
AU  - Simmons D
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0560-0761
AD  - School of Medical Sciences, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden.
AD  - School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia.
FAU - Fadl, H
AU  - Fadl H
AD  - Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School of Medical Sciences, Orebro
      University, Orebro, Sweden.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/01/31 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/31 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/18 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13843 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Feb;36(2):151-157. doi: 10.1111/dme.13843.

PMID- 30698863
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190130
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
VI  - 36
IP  - 2
DP  - 2019 Feb
TI  - Higher rates of large-for-gestational-age newborns mediated by excess maternal
      weight gain in pregnancies with Type 1 diabetes and use of continuous
      subcutaneous insulin infusion vs multiple dose insulin injection.
PG  - 158-166
LID - 10.1111/dme.13861 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To compare glycaemic control, maternal and neonatal outcomes in pregnancies
      with Type 1 diabetes, managed either by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion,
      multiple daily insulin injection or switch from multiple daily insulin injection 
      (MDI) to continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in early pregnancy.
      RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data from 339 singleton pregnancies were
      retrospectively reviewed. HbA1c values were measured preconception and in each
      trimester. In a secondary analysis, use of CSII pre-pregnancy was compared with
      initiation of CSII during pregnancy. RESULTS: MDI was used in 140 pregnancies
      (41.3%) and CSII was used in 199 (58.7%), including 34 pregnancies (10.0%) during
      which the women switched to CSII. In pregnancies during which CSII was used
      duration of diabetes [median (interquartile range) 16.0 (8.0-23.0) years vs 11.0 
      (5.5-17.5) years; P<0.001] was longer, and the Institute of Medicine
      recommendations for appropriate weight gain were exceeded more often (64.8% vs.
      50.8%; P=0.01). CSII use and pre-pregnancy BMI were independent predictors of
      excess weight gain. There was no difference in glucose control, but CSII was
      associated with higher birth weight [median (interquartile range) 3720
      (3365-4100) g vs 3360 (3365-4100) g; P<0.001] and higher
      large-for-gestational-age (LGA) rate (44.7% vs. 33.6%; P=0.04) than MDI. HbA1c
      concentration in the third trimester and excess weight gain were predictive of
      LGA infants [odds ratio 2.33 (95% CI 1.54-3.51); P<0.001 and 1.89 (95% CI
      1.02-3.51); P=0.04]. In pregnancies where CSII therapy was initiated in the first
      trimester and in those with pre-pregnancy use, similar glucose control and
      outcome was achieved. CONCLUSIONS: There was no advantage of CSII with respect to
      glycaemic control and neonatal outcomes. The rate of LGA neonates was higher in
      the CSII group, possibly mediated by excess maternal weight gain, which was more 
      frequent than in women treated with MDI.
CI  - (c) 2019 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Hauffe, F
AU  - Hauffe F
AD  - Berlin Centre for Diabetes and Pregnancy, Department of Obstetrics and
      Gynaecology, St Joseph Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Schaefer-Graf, U M
AU  - Schaefer-Graf UM
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3545-8009
AD  - Berlin Centre for Diabetes and Pregnancy, Department of Obstetrics and
      Gynaecology, St Joseph Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Fauzan, R
AU  - Fauzan R
AD  - Berlin Centre for Diabetes and Pregnancy, Department of Obstetrics and
      Gynaecology, St Joseph Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Schohe, A L
AU  - Schohe AL
AD  - Berlin Centre for Diabetes and Pregnancy, Department of Obstetrics and
      Gynaecology, St Joseph Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Scholle, D
AU  - Scholle D
AD  - Berlin Centre for Diabetes and Pregnancy, Department of Obstetrics and
      Gynaecology, St Joseph Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Sedlacek, L
AU  - Sedlacek L
AD  - Berlin Centre for Diabetes and Pregnancy, Department of Obstetrics and
      Gynaecology, St Joseph Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Scherer, K A
AU  - Scherer KA
AD  - Department of Obstetrics, Campus Rudolf-Virchow, Charite Medical Faculty,
      Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Klapp, C
AU  - Klapp C
AD  - Department of Obstetrics, Campus Rudolf-Virchow, Charite Medical Faculty,
      Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Ramsauer, B
AU  - Ramsauer B
AD  - Vivantes Neukoelln Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Henrich, W
AU  - Henrich W
AD  - Department of Obstetrics, Campus Rudolf-Virchow, Charite Medical Faculty,
      Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Schlembach, D
AU  - Schlembach D
AD  - Vivantes Neukoelln Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
FAU - Abou-Dakn, M
AU  - Abou-Dakn M
AD  - Berlin Centre for Diabetes and Pregnancy, Department of Obstetrics and
      Gynaecology, St Joseph Hospital, Berlin, Germany.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/01/31 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/31 06:00
PHST- 2018/11/08 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [medline]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13861 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Feb;36(2):158-166. doi: 10.1111/dme.13861.

PMID- 30697808
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 30
TI  - Association between HbA1c and the development of cystic fibrosis-related
      diabetes.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13912 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To examine HbA1c as a predictor of risk for future development of cystic
      fibrosis-related diabetes and to assess the association with the development of
      retinopathy in people with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes. METHODS: A 7-year
      retrospective longitudinal study was conducted in 50 adults with cystic fibrosis,
      comparing oral glucose tolerance test results with HbA1c values in predicting the
      development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes. Retinal screening data were also
      compared with HbA1c measurements to assess microvascular outcome. RESULTS: An
      HbA1c value >/=37 mmol/mol (5.5%; hazard ratio 3.49, CI 1.5-8.1) was
      significantly associated with the development of dysglycaemia, as defined by the 
      oral glucose tolerance test over a 7-year period. Severity of diabetic
      retinopathy was associated with a higher HbA1c and longer duration of cystic
      fibrosis-related diabetes. CONCLUSION: There is a link between HbA1c level and
      the future development of dysglycaemia in cystic fibrosis based on oral glucose
      tolerance test, as well as microvascular outcomes. Although current guidance does
      not advocate the use of HbA1c as a diagnostic tool in cystic fibrosis-related
      diabetes, it may be of clinical use in determining individuals at risk of future 
      development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.
CI  - (c) 2019 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Choudhury, M
AU  - Choudhury M
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2118-5537
AD  - All Wales Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff,
      UK.
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff, UK.
FAU - Taylor, P
AU  - Taylor P
AD  - Thyroid Research Group, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University
      School of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.
FAU - Morgan, P H
AU  - Morgan PH
AD  - Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
FAU - Duckers, J
AU  - Duckers J
AD  - All Wales Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff,
      UK.
FAU - Lau, D
AU  - Lau D
AD  - All Wales Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff,
      UK.
FAU - George, L
AU  - George L
AD  - All Wales Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff,
      UK.
FAU - Ketchell, R I
AU  - Ketchell RI
AD  - All Wales Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff,
      UK.
FAU - Wong, F S
AU  - Wong FS
AD  - All Wales Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff,
      UK.
AD  - Diabetes Research Group, Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190130
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/01/31 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/31 06:00
PHST- 2019/01/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13912 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Jan 30. doi: 10.1111/dme.13912.

PMID- 30697804
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190211
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 30
TI  - How tightly controlled do fluctuations in blood glucose levels need to be to
      reduce the risk of developing complications in people with Type 1 diabetes?
LID - 10.1111/dme.13911 [doi]
AB  - In 2011, the James Lind Alliance published a 'top 10' list of priorities for Type
      1 diabetes research based on a structured consultation process. Whether reducing 
      fluctuations in blood glucose can prevent long-term microvascular and
      macrovascular complications was one of these. In this narrative review, 8 years
      on, we have assessed the updated evidence for the assertion that increased
      glucose variability plays an independent and clinically important role in the
      complications of Type 1 diabetes, over and above mean blood glucose and the
      effects of hypoglycaemia: the 'glucose variability hypothesis'. Although studies 
      in cultured cells and ex vivo vessels have been suggestive, most studies in Type 
      1 diabetes have been small and/or cross-sectional, and based on 'finger-prick'
      glucose measurements that capture glucose variability only in waking hours and
      are affected by missing data. A recent analysis of the Diabetes Control and
      Complications Trial that formally imputed missing data found no independent
      effect of short-term glucose variability on long-term complications. Few other
      high-quality longitudinal studies have directly addressed the glucose variability
      hypothesis in Type 1 diabetes. We conclude that there is little substantial
      evidence to date to support this hypothesis in Type 1 diabetes, although
      increasing use of continuous glucose monitoring provides an opportunity to test
      it more definitively. In the meantime, we recommend that control of glycaemia in 
      Type 1 diabetes should continue to focus on the sustained achievement of target
      HbA1c and avoidance of hypoglycaemia.
CI  - (c) 2019 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Livingstone, R
AU  - Livingstone R
AD  - Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular
      Research Centre, Glasgow, UK.
FAU - Boyle, J G
AU  - Boyle JG
AD  - School of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
AD  - Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK.
FAU - Petrie, J R
AU  - Petrie JR
AUID- ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4894-9819
AD  - Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, BHF Glasgow Cardiovascular
      Research Centre, Glasgow, UK.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
PT  - Review
DEP - 20190130
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/01/31 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/31 06:00
PHST- 2019/01/28 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13911 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Jan 30. doi: 10.1111/dme.13911.

PMID- 30690790
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190221
IS  - 1464-5491 (Electronic)
IS  - 0742-3071 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 28
TI  - Prevalence of diabetes among children treated with growth hormone in Israel.
LID - 10.1111/dme.13910 [doi]
AB  - AIMS: To determine the long-term risk of diabetes in a cohort of children treated
      with recombinant human growth hormone in Israel, using data from the Israeli
      National Diabetes Register. METHODS: Between 1988 and 2009, 2513 children were
      approved for growth hormone treatment. They were assigned to one of two groups.
      The first group included children treated for isolated growth hormone deficiency 
      and who were small for gestational age and the second included those treated for 
      multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, chronic renal failure, Turner syndrome or 
      Prader-Willi syndrome. The cohort was cross-linked with the Israeli National
      Diabetes Register for 2014 (mean follow-up duration 12.1+/-5.3 years), and
      prevalent cases of diabetes were identified. Standardized prevalence ratios for
      diabetes were calculated for people aged 10-29 years. RESULTS: In 2014, a total
      of 23 individuals were identified with diabetes (four with pre-existing diabetes,
      seven developed diabetes before age 17 years and 12 developed it at a later age).
      In the isolated growth hormone deficiency and small-for-gestational-age group
      there was no difference in the prevalence of diabetes compared with the general
      population (standardized prevalence ratio 2.05, 95% CI 0.94-3.89). In the group
      that included people with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, chronic renal
      failure, Turner syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome there was a significantly
      higher diabetes prevalence (standardized prevalence ratio 11.94, 95% CI
      6.53-20.00) compared with the general population. CONCLUSIONS: No difference in
      diabetes prevalence was found in the isolated growth hormone deficiency and
      small-for-gestational-age group, compared with the general population. Children
      treated with growth hormone with pre-existing risk factors had an increased
      prevalence of diabetes. It is advisable to monitor blood glucose levels closely
      during and after growth hormone treatment, especially in such children.
CI  - (c) 2019 Diabetes UK.
FAU - Lutski, M
AU  - Lutski M
AD  - Israel Centre for Disease Control, Israel Ministry of Health, Ramat Gan.
FAU - Zucker, I
AU  - Zucker I
AD  - Israel Centre for Disease Control, Israel Ministry of Health, Ramat Gan.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health,
      Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv.
FAU - Zadik, Z
AU  - Zadik Z
AD  - Paediatric Endocrinology Unit, Kaplan Medical Centre, Rehovot.
FAU - Libruder, C
AU  - Libruder C
AD  - Israel Centre for Disease Control, Israel Ministry of Health, Ramat Gan.
FAU - Blumenfeld, O
AU  - Blumenfeld O
AD  - Israel Centre for Disease Control, Israel Ministry of Health, Ramat Gan.
FAU - Shohat, T
AU  - Shohat T
AD  - Israel Centre for Disease Control, Israel Ministry of Health, Ramat Gan.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health,
      Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv.
FAU - Laron, Z
AU  - Laron Z
AD  - Endocrinology and Diabetes Research Unit, Schneider Children's Medical Centre,
      Petah Tikva, Israel.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190128
PL  - England
TA  - Diabet Med
JT  - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association
JID - 8500858
EDAT- 2019/01/29 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/29 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/29 06:00
PHST- 2018/12/05 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/29 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/29 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/01/29 06:00 [entrez]
AID - 10.1111/dme.13910 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabet Med. 2019 Jan 28. doi: 10.1111/dme.13910.

PMID- 30696708
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190130
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 29
TI  - Insulin Therapy of Gestational Diabetes Does Not Fully Protect Offspring from
      Diet-Induced Metabolic Disorders.
LID - db181151 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-1151 [doi]
AB  - Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with increased risk of
      metabolic disorders in offspring in later life. Although mounting evidence
      suggests that therapy for GDM could improve neonatal health, it is not known
      whether the therapy confers long-term metabolic benefits to offspring in their
      later adult lives. Here, using a mouse model of diabetes in the latter half of
      pregnancy to mimic human GDM, we find that the efficient insulin therapy of GDM
      confers significant protection against glucose intolerance and obesity in
      offspring fed on normal chow diet. However, the therapy fails to protect
      offspring when challenged with a high fat diet, especially for male offspring.
      Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of pancreatic islets from male offspring
      identified hypermethylated regions in several genes that regulate insulin
      secretion, including Abcc8, Cav1.2 and Cav2.3 that encode KATP or Ca(2+)
      channels, which is associated with reduced gene expression and impaired insulin
      secretion. This finding suggests a methylation-mediated epigenetic mechanism for 
      GDM-induced intergenerational glucose intolerance. It highlights that even
      efficient insulin therapy of GDM is insufficient to fully protect adult offspring
      from diet-induced metabolic disorders.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Zhu, Hong
AU  - Zhu H
AD  - The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Genetics (Zhejiang University), Ministry of
      Education, Zhejiang university school of medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
FAU - Chen, Bin
AU  - Chen B
AD  - The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Genetics (Zhejiang University), Ministry of
      Education, Zhejiang university school of medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
FAU - Cheng, Yi
AU  - Cheng Y
AD  - The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Genetics (Zhejiang University), Ministry of
      Education, Zhejiang university school of medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
AD  - Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University school of
      medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
FAU - Zhou, Yin
AU  - Zhou Y
AD  - The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Genetics (Zhejiang University), Ministry of
      Education, Zhejiang university school of medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
FAU - Yan, Yi-Shang
AU  - Yan YS
AD  - The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Genetics (Zhejiang University), Ministry of
      Education, Zhejiang university school of medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
FAU - Luo, Qiong
AU  - Luo Q
AD  - Department of Obstetrics, Women's Hospital, Zhejiang University school of
      medicine, Hangzhou, China.
FAU - Jiang, Ying
AU  - Jiang Y
AD  - Department of Obstetrics, Women's Hospital, Zhejiang University school of
      medicine, Hangzhou, China.
FAU - Sheng, Jian-Zhong
AU  - Sheng JZ
AD  - The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Genetics (Zhejiang University), Ministry of
      Education, Zhejiang university school of medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
AD  - Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, Zhejiang University school of
      medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
FAU - Ding, Guo-Lian
AU  - Ding GL
AD  - The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Institute of
      Embryo-Fetal Original Adult Disease, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong
      University, Shanghai, China hhf57@zju.edu.cn.
AD  - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Embryo Original Diseases, Shanghai, China.
FAU - Huang, He-Feng
AU  - Huang HF
AD  - The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Genetics (Zhejiang University), Ministry of
      Education, Zhejiang university school of medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
      hhf57@zju.edu.cn.
AD  - The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Institute of
      Embryo-Fetal Original Adult Disease, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong
      University, Shanghai, China.
AD  - Shanghai Key Laboratory of Embryo Original Diseases, Shanghai, China.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190129
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2019/01/31 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/31 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/31 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/25 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/18 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/31 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-1151 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-1151 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2019 Jan 29. pii: db18-1151. doi: 10.2337/db18-1151.

PMID- 30679185
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190215
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 24
TI  - Opposing Effects of Neuropilin-1 and -2 on Sensory Nerve Regeneration in Wounded 
      Corneas: Role of Sema3C in Ameliorating Diabetic Neurotrophic Keratopathy.
LID - db181172 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-1172 [doi]
AB  - The diabetic cornea exhibits pathological alterations such as delayed epithelial 
      wound healing and nerve regeneration. We sought to investigate the role of
      Semaphorin (SEMA) 3C in corneal wound healing and re-innervation in normal and
      diabetic B6 mice. Wounding induced the expression of SEMA3A, 3C and their
      receptor Neuropilin (NRP) 2, but not NRP1 in normal corneal epithelial cells
      (CECs); this upregulation was suppressed for SEMA3C and NRP2 in diabetic corneas.
      Injections of Sema3C-specific siRNA and NRP2 neutralizing antibodies in wounded
      mice resulted in a decrease in the rate of wound healing and regenerating nerve
      fibers, while exogenous SEMA3C had opposing effects in diabetic corneas. NRP1
      neutralization, on the other hand, decreased epithelial wound closure but
      increased sensory nerve regeneration in diabetic corneas, suggesting a
      detrimental role in nerve regeneration. Taken together, epithelium-expressed
      SEMA3C plays a role in corneal epithelial wound closure and sensory nerve
      regeneration. The hyperglycemia-suppressed SEMA3C/NRP2 signaling may contribute
      to the pathogenesis of diabetic neurotrophic keratopathy, and SEMA3C might be
      used as an adjunctive therapeutic for treating the disease.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Lee, Patrick Shean-Young
AU  - Lee PS
AD  - Departments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University
      School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
FAU - Gao, Nan
AU  - Gao N
AD  - Departments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University
      School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
FAU - Dike, Mamata
AU  - Dike M
AD  - Departments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University
      School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
FAU - Shkilnyy, Olga
AU  - Shkilnyy O
AD  - Departments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University
      School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
FAU - Me, Rao
AU  - Me R
AD  - Departments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University
      School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
FAU - Zhang, Yangyang
AU  - Zhang Y
AD  - Departments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University
      School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
AD  - Qingdao Eye Hospital, Shandong Eye Institute, Shandong Academy of Medical
      Sciences, Qingdao, China.
FAU - Yu, Fu-Shin X
AU  - Yu FX
AD  - Departments of Ophthalmology and Anatomy and Cell Biology, Wayne State University
      School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA av3899@wayne.edu.
LA  - eng
GR  - F30 EY025923/EY/NEI NIH HHS/United States
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190124
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2019/01/27 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/27 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/26 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/30 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/13 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/01/26 06:00 [entrez]
AID - db18-1172 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-1172 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2019 Jan 24. pii: db18-1172. doi: 10.2337/db18-1172.

PMID- 30679184
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190125
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 24
TI  - Neurovascular Response to Pressure in Patients with Diabetic Foot Ulcer.
LID - db180694 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-0694 [doi]
AB  - Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a problem worldwide and prevention is crucial. We
      hypothesized that the inability of the skin to respond to pressure is involved in
      DFU pathogenesis and could be an important predictive factor to take into
      account.We included 29 patients with DFU and 30 patients with type 2 diabetes
      without DFU. Neuropathy and skin blood flow at rest were assessed in response to 
      acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, local heating (42 degrees C), and to
      non-noxious locally applied pressure. Results were compared to those obtained
      from 10 healthy age-matched control subjects.Vasodilatation in response to
      pressure was significantly impaired in both diabetic groups compared to healthy
      subjects. The vasodilator capacity to pressure was significantly lower in
      patients with DFU compared to those without DFU, despite the absence of
      significant difference in cutaneous pressure perception threshold and vascular
      reactivity to acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and heat.This pronounced
      alteration of neurovascular response to pressure in patients with DFU is a good
      marker of skin vulnerability and could be used to better predict individuals at
      risk.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Vouillarmet, Julien
AU  - Vouillarmet J
AD  - Hospices Civils de Lyon, Diabetes department, Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Pierre
      Benite, France. julien.vouillarmet@chu-lyon.fr.
FAU - Josset-Lamaugarny, Audrey
AU  - Josset-Lamaugarny A
AD  - UMR CNRS 5305, Laboratoire de Biologie Tissulaire et Ingenierie therapeutique,
      Lyon, France.
AD  - Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France.
FAU - Michon, Paul
AU  - Michon P
AD  - Hospices Civils de Lyon, Diabetes department, Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Pierre
      Benite, France.
FAU - Saumet, Jean Louis
AU  - Saumet JL
AD  - UMR CNRS 5305, Laboratoire de Biologie Tissulaire et Ingenierie therapeutique,
      Lyon, France.
AD  - Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France.
FAU - Koitka-Weber, Audrey
AU  - Koitka-Weber A
AD  - Vascular medecine department, CHU d'Angers, Angers, France.
AD  - Department of Medicine, Wurzburg University Clinic, Wurzburg, Germany.
FAU - Henni, Samir
AU  - Henni S
AD  - Vascular medecine department, CHU d'Angers, Angers, France.
FAU - Fromy, Berengere
AU  - Fromy B
AD  - UMR CNRS 5305, Laboratoire de Biologie Tissulaire et Ingenierie therapeutique,
      Lyon, France.
AD  - Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France.
FAU - Sigaudo-Roussel, Dominique
AU  - Sigaudo-Roussel D
AD  - UMR CNRS 5305, Laboratoire de Biologie Tissulaire et Ingenierie therapeutique,
      Lyon, France.
AD  - Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190124
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2019/01/27 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/27 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/26 06:00
PHST- 2018/06/27 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/12/16 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-0694 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-0694 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2019 Jan 24. pii: db18-0694. doi: 10.2337/db18-0694.

PMID- 30679183
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190125
IS  - 1939-327X (Electronic)
IS  - 0012-1797 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 24
TI  - Potential of Allogeneic Adipose-Derived Stem Cell - Hydrogel Complex for Treating
      Diabetic Foot Ulcers.
LID - db180699 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/db18-0699 [doi]
AB  - Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may hold great promise for treating diabetic
      wounds. However, it is difficult for a clinician to use MSCs because they have
      not been commercialized. Meanwhile, a new commercial drug that contains
      adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) has been developed. The purpose of this study
      was to examine the potential of allogeneic ASC sheets for treating diabetic foot 
      ulcers. Fifty-nine patients with diabetic foot ulcers were randomized to either
      ASC treatment group (n = 30) or control group treated with polyurethane film (n =
      29). Either allogeneic ASC sheet or polyurethane film was applied on diabetic
      wounds weekly. These wounds were evaluated for a maximum of 12 weeks. Complete
      wound closure was achieved for 73% in the treatment group and 47% in the control 
      group at week 8. Complete wound closure was achieved for 82% in the treatment
      group and 53% in the control group at week 12. Kaplan-Meier median times to
      complete closure were 28.5 and 63.0 days for the treatment group and the control 
      group, respectively. There were no serious adverse events related to allogeneic
      ASC treatment. Thus, allogeneic ASCs might be effective and safe to treat
      diabetic foot ulcers.
CI  - (c) 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Moon, Kyung-Chul
AU  - Moon KC
AD  - Department of Plastic Surgery, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, South
      Korea.
FAU - Suh, Hyun-Suk
AU  - Suh HS
AD  - Department of Plastic Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.
FAU - Kim, Ki-Bum
AU  - Kim KB
AD  - Department of Plastic Surgery, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, South
      Korea.
FAU - Han, Seung-Kyu
AU  - Han SK
AD  - Department of Plastic Surgery, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
      pshan@kumc.or.kr.
FAU - Young, Ki-Won
AU  - Young KW
AD  - Department of Foot and Ankle Surgery, Eulji Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.
FAU - Lee, Jin-Woo
AU  - Lee JW
AD  - Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 
      South Korea.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190124
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes
JT  - Diabetes
JID - 0372763
EDAT- 2019/01/27 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/27 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/26 06:00
PHST- 2018/06/25 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/12/16 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - db18-0699 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/db18-0699 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes. 2019 Jan 24. pii: db18-0699. doi: 10.2337/db18-0699.

PMID- 30692241
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190129
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 28
TI  - Maternal and Newborn Vitamin D-Binding Protein, Vitamin D Levels, Vitamin D
      Receptor Genotype, and Childhood Type 1 Diabetes.
LID - dc182176 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-2176 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Circumstantial evidence links 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D], vitamin 
      D-binding protein (DBP), vitamin D-associated genes, and type 1 diabetes (T1D),
      but no studies have jointly analyzed these. We aimed to investigate whether DBP
      levels during pregnancy or at birth were associated with offspring T1D and
      whether vitamin D pathway genetic variants modified associations between DBP,
      25(OH)D, and T1D. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: From a cohort of >100,000
      mother/child pairs, we analyzed 189 pairs where the child later developed T1D and
      576 random control pairs. We measured 25(OH)D using liquid chromatography-tandem 
      mass spectrometry, and DBP using polyclonal radioimmunoassay, in cord blood and
      maternal plasma samples collected at delivery and midpregnancy. We genotyped
      mother and child for variants in or near genes involved in vitamin D metabolism
      (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, CYP24A1, CYP27B1, and VDR). Logistic regression was used to
      estimate odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Higher
      maternal DBP levels at delivery, but not in other samples, were associated with
      lower offspring T1D risk (OR 0.86 [95% CI 0.74-0.98] per mumol/L increase).
      Higher cord blood 25(OH)D levels were associated with lower T1D risk (OR = 0.87
      [95% CI 0.77-0.98] per 10 nmol/L increase) in children carrying the VDR
      rs11568820 G/G genotype (P interaction = 0.01 between 25(OH)D level and
      rs11568820). We did not detect other gene-environment interactions. CONCLUSIONS: 
      Higher maternal DBP level at delivery may decrease offspring T1D risk. Increased 
      25(OH)D levels at birth may decrease T1D risk, depending on VDR genotype. These
      findings should be replicated in other studies. Future studies of vitamin D and
      T1D should include VDR genotype and DBP levels.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Tapia, German
AU  - Tapia G
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1770-1183
AD  - Department of Chronic Diseases and Ageing, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 
      Oslo, Norway german.tapia@fhi.no.
FAU - Marild, Karl
AU  - Marild K
AD  - Department of Chronic Diseases and Ageing, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 
      Oslo, Norway.
FAU - Dahl, Sandra R
AU  - Dahl SR
AD  - Hormone Laboratory, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital,
      Aker, Oslo, Norway.
FAU - Lund-Blix, Nicolai A
AU  - Lund-Blix NA
AD  - Department of Chronic Diseases and Ageing, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 
      Oslo, Norway.
AD  - Barbara Davis Center for Diabetes, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical
      Campus, Aurora, CO.
AD  - Division of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo,
      Norway.
FAU - Viken, Marte K
AU  - Viken MK
AD  - Department of Immunology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
FAU - Lie, Benedicte A
AU  - Lie BA
AD  - Department of Immunology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
AD  - Department of Medical Genetics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
FAU - Njolstad, Pal R
AU  - Njolstad PR
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0304-6728
AD  - Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital,
      Bergen, Norway.
AD  - KG Jebsen Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Clinical Science,
      University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
FAU - Joner, Geir
AU  - Joner G
AD  - Division of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo,
      Norway.
AD  - Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
FAU - Skrivarhaug, Torild
AU  - Skrivarhaug T
AD  - Division of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo,
      Norway.
AD  - Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
FAU - Cohen, Arieh S
AU  - Cohen AS
AD  - Department of Congenital Disorders, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
FAU - Stordal, Ketil
AU  - Stordal K
AD  - Department of Chronic Diseases and Ageing, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 
      Oslo, Norway.
AD  - Department of Pediatrics, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Gralum, Norway.
FAU - Stene, Lars C
AU  - Stene LC
AD  - Department of Chronic Diseases and Ageing, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 
      Oslo, Norway.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190128
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/01/30 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/30 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/10/18 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/02 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-2176 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-2176 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Jan 28. pii: dc18-2176. doi: 10.2337/dc18-2176.

PMID- 30692240
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190129
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 28
TI  - Frailty and Risk of Fractures in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.
LID - dc181965 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1965 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore whether frailty was associated with fracture risk 
      and whether frailty could modify the propensity of type 2 diabetes toward
      increased risk of fractures. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were from a
      prospective cohort study. Our primary outcome was time to the first incident
      clinical fragility fracture; secondary outcomes included time to hip fracture and
      to clinical spine fracture. Frailty status was measured by a Frailty Index (FI)
      of deficit accumulation. Cox model incorporating an interaction term (frailty x
      diabetes) was used for analyses. RESULTS: The analysis included 3,149 (70% women)
      participants; 138 (60% women) had diabetes. Higher bone mineral density and FI
      were observed in participants with diabetes compared with control subjects. A
      significant relationship between the FI and the risk of incident fragility
      fractures was found, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.02 (95% CI 1.01-1.03) and 1.19
      (95% CI 1.10-1.33) for per-0.01 and per-0.10 FI increase, respectively. The
      interaction was also statistically significant (P = 0.018). The HR for per-0.1
      increase in the FI was 1.33 for diabetes and 1.19 for nondiabetes if combining
      the estimate for the FI itself with the estimate from the interaction term. No
      evidence of interaction between frailty and diabetes was found for risk of hip
      and clinical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Participants with type 2 diabetes were
      significantly frailer than individuals without diabetes. Frailty increases the
      risk of fragility fracture and enhances the effect of diabetes on fragility
      fractures. Particular attention should be paid to diabetes as a risk factor for
      fragility fractures in those who are frail.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Li, Guowei
AU  - Li G
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3472-8513
AD  - Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Methodology (CCEM), Guangdong Second
      Provincial General Hospital, Guangzhou, China lig28@mcmaster.ca.
AD  - Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HEI), McMaster
      University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Prior, Jerilynn C
AU  - Prior JC
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British
      Columbia, Canada.
FAU - Leslie, William D
AU  - Leslie WD
AD  - Departments of Medicine and Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg,
      Manitoba, Canada.
FAU - Thabane, Lehana
AU  - Thabane L
AD  - Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HEI), McMaster
      University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Papaioannou, Alexandra
AU  - Papaioannou A
AD  - Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HEI), McMaster
      University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Josse, Robert G
AU  - Josse RG
AD  - Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Kaiser, Stephanie M
AU  - Kaiser SM
AD  - Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
FAU - Kovacs, Christopher S
AU  - Kovacs CS
AD  - Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's,
      Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.
FAU - Anastassiades, Tassos
AU  - Anastassiades T
AD  - Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Towheed, Tanveer
AU  - Towheed T
AD  - Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Davison, K Shawn
AU  - Davison KS
AD  - Saskatoon Osteoporosis and CaMos Centre, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
FAU - Levine, Mitchell
AU  - Levine M
AD  - Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HEI), McMaster
      University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
AD  - Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
FAU - Goltzman, David
AU  - Goltzman D
AD  - Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
FAU - Adachi, Jonathan D
AU  - Adachi JD
CN  - CaMos Research Group
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190128
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/01/30 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/30 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/17 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/07 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1965 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1965 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Jan 28. pii: dc18-1965. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1965.

PMID- 30692239
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190129
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 28
TI  - Cumulative Risk of End-Stage Renal Disease Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A
      Nationwide Inception Cohort Study.
LID - dc181485 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1485 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: To estimate long-term cumulative risk of end-stage renal disease
      (ESRD) after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This
      nationwide population-based inception cohort study included 421,429 patients with
      type 2 diabetes diagnosed in 1990-2011; patients were followed until the end of
      2013. Data linkage between several national health care registers in Finland,
      covering 100% of the population, enabled the inclusion of almost all inhabitants 
      who started taking diabetes medication or were hospitalized for diabetes.
      Cumulative risk of ESRD and hazard ratios [HR] for ESRD and death were estimated 
      according to age, sex, and time period of diabetes diagnosis. RESULTS: Among
      421,429 patients with type 2 diabetes, 1,516 developed ESRD and 150,524 died
      during 3,458,797 patient-years of follow-up. Cumulative risk of ESRD was 0.29% at
      10 years and 0.74% at 20 years from diagnosis of diabetes. Risk was higher among 
      men than among women (HR 1.93 [95% CI 1.72-2.16]), decreased with older age at
      diagnosis (HR 0.70 [95% CI 0.60-0.81] for age 60-69 vs. 40-49 years), and was
      lower for those diagnosed in 2000-2011 than in 1990-1994 (HR 0.72 [95% CI
      0.63-0.81]). Patients diagnosed with diabetes in 2000-2011 had lower risk of
      death during follow-up than those diagnosed in 1990-1994 (HR 0.64 [95% CI
      0.63-0.65]). CONCLUSIONS: Cumulative risk of ESRD is minimal among patients with 
      type 2 diabetes compared with their risk of death. Patients diagnosed with
      diabetes at an older age have a lower risk of ESRD due to higher competing
      mortality.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Finne, Patrik
AU  - Finne P
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3742-1576
AD  - Abdominal Centre Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University
      Hospital, Helsinki, Finland patrik.finne@hus.fi.
AD  - Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases, Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Groop, Per-Henrik
AU  - Groop PH
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4055-6954
AD  - Abdominal Centre Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University
      Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Folkhalsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhalsan Research Center Biomedicum Helsinki,
      Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Department of Diabetes, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne,
      Australia.
FAU - Arffman, Martti
AU  - Arffman M
AD  - Department of Health and Social Care Systems, National Institute for Health and
      Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Kervinen, Marjo
AU  - Kervinen M
AD  - Centre of Medicine, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
FAU - Helve, Jaakko
AU  - Helve J
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8962-0702
AD  - Abdominal Centre Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University
      Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Gronhagen-Riska, Carola
AU  - Gronhagen-Riska C
AD  - Finnish Registry for Kidney Diseases, Helsinki, Finland.
FAU - Sund, Reijo
AU  - Sund R
AD  - Department of Social Research, Centre for Research Methods, University of
      Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
AD  - Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190128
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/01/30 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/30 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/07/11 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2019/01/01 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1485 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1485 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Jan 28. pii: dc18-1485. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1485.

PMID- 30692238
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190129
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 28
TI  - Sex Differences in Cardiovascular Risk Profile From Childhood to Midlife Between 
      Individuals Who Did and Did Not Develop Diabetes at Follow-up: The Bogalusa Heart
      Study.
LID - dc182029 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-2029 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Childhood and young adulthood may represent time periods in which
      cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) and their cumulative exposure lay the
      foundation for future risk of chronic diseases. We examined the longitudinal
      burden of CVRFs since childhood in men and women in whom diabetes did and did not
      develop at follow-up. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We included 1,530 participants
      (mean [SD] follow-up time 33.1 years [8.2 years]), who participated in the
      Bogalusa Heart Study and had been examined at least four times starting in
      childhood (mean age [SD] at first examination 9.4 years [3.1 years]). The area
      under the growth curve was used as a measure of cumulative exposure to CVRFs
      since childhood. RESULTS: In childhood, boys and girls in whom diabetes did and
      did not develop at follow-up had similar CVRFs. Yet, over time, women during the 
      transition from normoglycemia to diabetes experienced greater adverse changes in 
      total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (noted 
      as early as 23.5 years old and persisting across adulthood up to the age of the
      diagnosis of diabetes); a higher burden of exposure to BMI, TC, LDL cholesterol, 
      and FPG from childhood to midlife; and a greater change in rates of BMI, TC, LDL 
      cholesterol, and FPG since childhood than men during the same transition
      (interaction P values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The greater exposure of women to and
      burden of CVRFs associated with diagnosis of diabetes may help to explain the
      stronger impact of diabetes as a major risk factor for cardiovascular events in
      women compared with men.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Du, Tingting
AU  - Du T
AD  - Department of Endocrinology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong
      University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People's Republic of China.
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane
      University, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Fernandez, Camilo
AU  - Fernandez C
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane
      University, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Barshop, Rupert
AU  - Barshop R
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane
      University, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Guo, Yajun
AU  - Guo Y
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane
      University, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Krousel-Wood, Marie
AU  - Krousel-Wood M
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane
      University, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Chen, Wei
AU  - Chen W
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-1566-7943
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane
      University, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Qi, Lu
AU  - Qi L
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8041-7791
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane
      University, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Harville, Emily
AU  - Harville E
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane
      University, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck
AU  - Mauvais-Jarvis F
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0874-0754
AD  - Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of
      Medicine, New Orleans, LA.
AD  - Southeast Louisiana Veterans Healthcare System Medical Center, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Fonseca, Vivian
AU  - Fonseca V
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3381-7151
AD  - Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Tulane University School of
      Medicine, New Orleans, LA.
AD  - Southeast Louisiana Veterans Healthcare System Medical Center, New Orleans, LA.
FAU - Bazzano, Lydia
AU  - Bazzano L
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8958-1352
AD  - Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane
      University, New Orleans, LA lbazzano@tulane.edu.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190128
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/01/30 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/30 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/30 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/25 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/12/23 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/30 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-2029 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-2029 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Jan 28. pii: dc18-2029. doi: 10.2337/dc18-2029.

PMID- 30679307
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190221
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 42
IP  - 3
DP  - 2019 Mar
TI  - Response to Comment on Laiteerapong et al. The Legacy Effect in Type 2 Diabetes: 
      Impact of Early Glycemic Control on Future Complications (The Diabetes & Aging
      Study). Diabetes Care 2019;42:416-426.
PG  - e46-e47
LID - 10.2337/dci18-0036 [doi]
FAU - Laiteerapong, Neda
AU  - Laiteerapong N
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0124-4325
AD  - Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL
      nlaiteerapong@uchicago.edu.
FAU - Ham, Sandra A
AU  - Ham SA
AD  - Center for Health and the Social Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago,
      IL.
FAU - Huang, Elbert S
AU  - Huang ES
AD  - Department of Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
FAU - Karter, Andrew J
AU  - Karter AJ
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5527-316X
AD  - Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA.
LA  - eng
PT  - Letter
DEP - 20190124
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/01/27 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/27 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/26 06:00
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/01/26 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dci18-0036 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dci18-0036 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Mar;42(3):e46-e47. doi: 10.2337/dci18-0036. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

PMID- 30679306
OWN - NLM
STAT- In-Data-Review
LR  - 20190221
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
VI  - 42
IP  - 3
DP  - 2019 Mar
TI  - Comment on Laiteerapong et al. The Legacy Effect in Type 2 Diabetes: Impact of
      Early Glycemic Control on Future Complications (The Diabetes & Aging Study).
      Diabetes Care 2019;42: 416-426.
PG  - e45
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1779 [doi]
FAU - Hulman, Adam
AU  - Hulman A
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3969-1000
AD  - Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark adam.hulman@ph.au.dk.
AD  - Danish Diabetes Academy, Odense, Denmark.
FAU - Bjerg, Lasse
AU  - Bjerg L
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4724-7276
AD  - Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
AD  - Danish Diabetes Academy, Odense, Denmark.
AD  - Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
FAU - Carstensen, Bendix
AU  - Carstensen B
AD  - Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
LA  - eng
PT  - Letter
DEP - 20190124
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/01/27 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/27 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/26 06:00
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [medline]
PHST- 2019/01/26 06:00 [entrez]
AID - dc18-1779 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1779 [doi]
PST - ppublish
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Mar;42(3):e45. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1779. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

PMID- 30679305
OWN - NLM
STAT- Publisher
LR  - 20190125
IS  - 1935-5548 (Electronic)
IS  - 0149-5992 (Linking)
DP  - 2019 Jan 24
TI  - Cardiovascular Risk Factor Burden in U.S. People With Incident Type 2 Diabetes
      Receiving Antidiabetic and Cardioprotective Therapies.
LID - dc181865 [pii]
LID - 10.2337/dc18-1865 [doi]
AB  - OBJECTIVE: Individualized treatment of patients with diabetes requires detailed
      evaluation of risk factor dynamics at the population level. This study evaluated 
      the persistent glycemic and cardiovascular (CV) risk factor burden over 2 years
      after treatment intensification (TI). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: From U.S.
      Centricity Electronic Medical Records, 276,884 patients with incident type 2
      diabetes who intensified metformin were selected. Systolic blood pressure (SBP)
      >/=130/140 mmHg and LDL >/=70/100 mg/dL were defined as uncontrolled for those
      with/without a history of CV disease at TI. Triglycerides >/=150 mg/dL and HbA1c 
      >/=7.5% (58 mmol/mol) were defined as uncontrolled. Longitudinal measures over 2 
      years after TI were used to define risk factor burden. RESULTS: With 3.7 years'
      mean follow-up, patients were 59 years, 70% obese, 22% had a history of CV
      disease; 60, 30, 50, and 48% had uncontrolled HbA1c, SBP, LDL, and triglycerides,
      respectively, at TI; and 81% and 69% were receiving antihypertensive(s) and
      lipid-modifying therapies, respectively. The proportion of patients with
      consistently uncontrolled HbA1c increased from 31% in 2005 to 41% in 2014. Among 
      those on lipid-modifying drugs, 41% and 37% had consistently high LDL and
      triglycerides over 2 years, respectively. Being on antihypertensive therapies,
      29% had consistently uncontrolled SBP. Among patients receiving cardioprotective 
      therapies, 63% failed to achieve control in HbA1c + LDL, 57% in HbA1c + SBP, 55% 
      in LDL + SBP, and 63% in HbA1c + triglycerides over 2 years after TI.
      CONCLUSIONS: Among patients on multiple therapies for risk factor control, more
      than one-third had uncontrolled HbA1c, lipid, and SBP levels, and more than
      one-half had two CV risk factors that were simultaneously uncontrolled after TI.
CI  - (c) 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
FAU - Montvida, Olga
AU  - Montvida O
AD  - Melbourne EpiCentre, University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Melbourne,
      Australia.
FAU - Cai, Xiaoling
AU  - Cai X
AD  - Melbourne EpiCentre, University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Melbourne,
      Australia.
FAU - Paul, Sanjoy K
AU  - Paul SK
AUID- ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0848-7194
AD  - Melbourne EpiCentre, University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Melbourne,
      Australia sanjoy.paul@unimelb.edu.au.
LA  - eng
PT  - Journal Article
DEP - 20190124
PL  - United States
TA  - Diabetes Care
JT  - Diabetes care
JID - 7805975
EDAT- 2019/01/27 06:00
MHDA- 2019/01/27 06:00
CRDT- 2019/01/26 06:00
PHST- 2018/09/05 00:00 [received]
PHST- 2018/12/27 00:00 [accepted]
PHST- 2019/01/26 06:00 [entrez]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [pubmed]
PHST- 2019/01/27 06:00 [medline]
AID - dc18-1865 [pii]
AID - 10.2337/dc18-1865 [doi]
PST - aheadofprint
SO  - Diabetes Care. 2019 Jan 24. pii: dc18-1865. doi: 10.2337/dc18-1865.